Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Dirk blade into sax? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 190

PostPosted: Thu 05 Mar, 2020 10:36 am    Post subject: Dirk blade into sax?         Reply with quote

Hello all,

I've recently wanted to add a sax to my collection, but also need to rein in my spending. It occurred to me that my old Crazy Crow kit-built dirk (which I've wanted to be rid of for a while) has a blade profile much like a broadsax. Do you see any potential here? Or is it just going to look like a chunky dirk blade with a sax hilt? I'm particularly unsure about the beveled false edge.



 Attachment: 435.11 KB
[ Download ]
View user's profile Send private message
Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,234

PostPosted: Fri 06 Mar, 2020 1:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't. I used one of the same blades, along with some brass mounts, a pommel cap and guard, to make a dirk well over 30 years ago. I also have a couple more laying in a drawer in my shop. Mine are cast and I assume yours is also. For the time and effort trying to re-configure the blade, you could probably grind one out of a piece of leaf spring that you would like better. And there is no telling what you would find once you started grinding on the casting.
Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
View user's profile Send private message
Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 190

PostPosted: Sat 07 Mar, 2020 2:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Huh... honestly, if it's such a junk blade, I'd rather just shelve the idea until my budget looks good enough to buy a decent one.

Well, it was worth asking Happy Thanks for the advice.
View user's profile Send private message
Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,234

PostPosted: Sat 07 Mar, 2020 7:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mine, as best I can recall, cost less than $20 - quite some time ago. It was not marked but the two I bought later were marked "India." May be perfectly OK I just would find it hard to justify the work for what it might turn out to be in the long run.
Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
View user's profile Send private message
Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 190

PostPosted: Sat 07 Mar, 2020 11:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here's a thought: How about I start by turning the false edge into an un-swedged broken back? That wouldn't take too much work, and it would hopefully reveal something about the steel quality. If it turns out to be poor, no big loss -- it's not doing me any good as is.
View user's profile Send private message
Andrew Gill





Joined: 19 Feb 2015

Posts: 112

PostPosted: Mon 09 Mar, 2020 5:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd have a go at doing a broken-backed seax, Dan.
If the blade is usable, great! If not, well at least you haven't wasted much beyond some time.
And, depending on how much metalwork you've done, you may have learned some useful lessons for your next attempt.
One's first few knives seldom look pretty, so it's worth trying something that won't cost an arm and a leg.

Actually, if this blade is cast, there are many inexpensive or free sources of medium-carbon steel (rotary lawn-mower blades, old vehicle leaf-springs or leaf-spring stock and some large circular saw blades and old files, to name a few). These can be annealed in a fire and made into very passable blades by cutting out a blank with a hacksaw or angle grinder, which can be ground or filed to shape. You can then send it away to be professionally heat-treated, or even try to do it yourself using a charcoal fire (I've done it in a barbecue, though it is a bit hit-and-miss under such rough-and-ready conditions). It is much more work than buying a ready-made blade or blank, but considerably cheaper, and very satisfying.
View user's profile Send private message
Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,234

PostPosted: Mon 09 Mar, 2020 8:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Why not Dan. Nothing ventured, nothing gained!
Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
View user's profile Send private message
Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 190

PostPosted: Fri 13 Mar, 2020 2:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Huzzah, I have broken its back. Not bad for less than an hour's work, although it still needs a lot of cleanup.

Still not sure about the steel quality. It seems... harder than mild steel, softer than a Windlass. No pitting of the kind that I'd normally associate with castings, but my experience with casting flaws only relates to bronze.



 Attachment: 219.11 KB
[ Download ]
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Dirk blade into sax?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2020 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum