Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Seax after "The Knife of Charlemagne" Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
G. Ghazarian
Industry Professional



Location: Florida USA
Joined: 01 Nov 2005

Posts: 215

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 08 Mar, 2010 4:14 pm    Post subject: Seax after "The Knife of Charlemagne"         Reply with quote

Here she is, and I must admit, I enjoyed every minute of making this elegant seax and wondering all along, how did these kinds of beautiful weapons fell out of use so early in history.....

Anyway, here are the specs :

Overall length :-------------------- 34 5/8 inches
Blade length :---------------------- 21 5/8
Handle length :-------------------- 13.0
Blade width at handle :--------- 1 1/4
Blade width at widest :---------- 2 3/4
Blade thickness at handle :--- 0.250
Center of gravity :---------------- 2 3/4 from handle
Blade steel :------------------------ 5160 spring steel
Weight :------------------------------ 2 lb 6,5 ounces

The handle is made of ebonized pearwood with fire oxidized brass metalworks.
Obviousely, this is a very beefed up version of The knife of Charlemagne, she behaves like a charm and handles just like a sword.

Your comments are welcomed.

Enjoy and thanks for looking.

Gabriel.



 Attachment: 31.56 KB
IMG_3104.JPG


 Attachment: 55.99 KB
IMG_3108.JPG


G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tony Brass





Joined: 15 Oct 2006

Posts: 115

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 08 Mar, 2010 9:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I often wonder how such great weapons fall into disuse. It would seem taht such a knife would be practical, and a formidable weapon for self-defense, and in battle.

The Falcata also fell into disuse, and I still wonder why we do not see a resurgence of that shape at falchions became popular.

I absolutley love the elegance of this weapon. Truly beautiful. Great work.
View user's profile Send private message
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
Industry Professional



Location: Netherlands
Joined: 11 Mar 2005

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 740

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 09 Mar, 2010 12:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice! For a sax that's not supposed to be an accurate reproduction, it does capture a lot of the essentials, which most reproductions haven't. I like it a lot that you also weren't afraid to put the historically long hilt on it.
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Reading list: 3 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,435

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Wed 10 Mar, 2010 9:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is the one it was modeled after, correct?

http://1501bc.com/files/saxes/SAX_L53bl31w45g...y_DSMS.jpg

M.

This space for rent or lease.
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
G. Ghazarian
Industry Professional



Location: Florida USA
Joined: 01 Nov 2005

Posts: 215

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Wed 10 Mar, 2010 1:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for your comments gentlemen, they are very much appreciated

M. Eversberg II wrote:
This is the one it was modeled after, correct?

http://1501bc.com/files/saxes/SAX_L53bl31w45g...y_DSMS.jpg

M.


That's correct. That's the one.

Gabriel

G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Craig Johnson
Industry Professional



Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 16 pages
Reading list: 20 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,288

Feedback score: 100%
(1 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Wed 17 Mar, 2010 6:11 am    Post subject: Very nice!         Reply with quote

Gabriel

That is very nice. I really like the look and the dimensions are deceiving, when I saw the picture I imagined a smaller item then I noticed how large it was. It must be quite impressive in the hand.

Do we know how large the original is?

Great Job

Craig
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
Industry Professional



Location: Netherlands
Joined: 11 Mar 2005

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 740

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Wed 17 Mar, 2010 6:30 am    Post subject: Re: Very nice!         Reply with quote

Craig Johnson wrote:
Gabriel

That is very nice. I really like the look and the dimensions are deceiving, when I saw the picture I imagined a smaller item then I noticed how large it was. It must be quite impressive in the hand.

Do we know how large the original is?

Great Job

Craig

The original is 53cm (dimension included in the name of the picture file), not quite as large as this one, but still quite a beast. Gabriel's example is in the long sax size territory, although a bit wider then broken back style long saxes.

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Craig Johnson
Industry Professional



Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 16 pages
Reading list: 20 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,288

Feedback score: 100%
(1 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Wed 17 Mar, 2010 6:56 am    Post subject: Thank you Jeroen         Reply with quote

Thank you Jeroen

That is a large piece. Thank you for the info I missed it in the pic text. Good way to add the info.

Thank you for sharing all the info on the saxes, its always been one of my favorite areas of study and you have contributed a great deal. Have you ever looked at the bird handled knives that have been found from this era?

Best
Craig
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
Industry Professional



Location: Netherlands
Joined: 11 Mar 2005

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 740

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Wed 17 Mar, 2010 7:32 am    Post subject: Re: Thank you Jeroen         Reply with quote

Craig Johnson wrote:
Thank you Jeroen

That is a large piece. Thank you for the info I missed it in the pic text. Good way to add the info.

Thank you for sharing all the info on the saxes, its always been one of my favorite areas of study and you have contributed a great deal. Have you ever looked at the bird handled knives that have been found from this era?

Yeah, I know several examples. Neither of them I'd consider saxes though. There's one very small knife (blade <10cm) from the Klingesmuseum in Solingen with a bone bird headed hilt. There's a straight backed large knife from the river Schelde at Belgium with a bird shaped hilt. This is described as being possibly a cut down blade (single edged sword?) and is not like any saxes I know. There's also a broad knife with a curved tip in the Klingesmuseum in Solingen with I believe a horse head or something, but again that's no sax either. There's no evidence that I know off that shows that saxes had such handles (the few scarce finds of hilts and contemporary images show simple straight hilts).

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Craig Johnson
Industry Professional



Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 16 pages
Reading list: 20 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,288

Feedback score: 100%
(1 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Wed 17 Mar, 2010 7:42 am    Post subject: Re: Thank you Jeroen         Reply with quote

Jeroen Zuiderwijk wrote:
Craig Johnson wrote:
Thank you Jeroen

That is a large piece. Thank you for the info I missed it in the pic text. Good way to add the info.

Thank you for sharing all the info on the saxes, its always been one of my favorite areas of study and you have contributed a great deal. Have you ever looked at the bird handled knives that have been found from this era?

Yeah, I know several examples. Neither of them I'd consider saxes though. There's one very small knife (blade <10cm) from the Klingesmuseum in Solingen with a bone bird headed hilt. There's a straight backed large knife from the river Schelde at Belgium with a bird shaped hilt. This is described as being possibly a cut down blade (single edged sword?) and is not like any saxes I know. There's also a broad knife with a curved tip in the Klingesmuseum in Solingen with I believe a horse head or something, but again that's no sax either. There's no evidence that I know off that shows that saxes had such handles (the few scarce finds of hilts and contemporary images show simple straight hilts).


Hi Jeroen

Thanks for the info. I did not intend to imply the bird head grips where on saxes at all. Just thought you would have had some contact with the type and might know of some. There is not a great deal of research on these that I have been able to find. They also seem to have a more clip or curved cutting edge type of blades to them as you describe.

Thanks
Craig
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
G. Ghazarian
Industry Professional



Location: Florida USA
Joined: 01 Nov 2005

Posts: 215

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 1:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just completed the twin sister of the above seax with a Vera handle and fire oxidized bronze metalworks. She is 2 inches overall longer than her sister.

Why am I making two of the almost same ? Because I fell in love with this type of swords and I believe, in my opinion, they have a certain Elegance that has Class.

Enjoy

Thanks for looking.

Gabriel



 Attachment: 33.05 KB
IMG_3125.JPG


 Attachment: 68.08 KB
IMG_3124.JPG


G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Hugo Voisine




PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 10:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This last one has very interesting textures thanks to your choice of wood and the treatment you applied to the bronze parts. Fine work as usual. Happy

Regarding the first one: pardon my ignorance but how did you "ebonized" the wood? Was it blackened with fire or simply dyed black... ?

« Que dites-vous ?... C'est inutile ?... Je le sais !
Mais on ne se bat pas dans l'espoir du succès !
Oh ! non, c'est bien plus beau lorsque c'est inutile ! »
View user's profile Send private message
Ken Speed





Joined: 09 Oct 2006

Posts: 656

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Sun 28 Mar, 2010 6:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Occasionally someone will post pictures of pieces they've made that transcend weapon status and become works of art. When that occurs I find I'm more likely to discuss the beauty and balance of the design than I am the apparent lethal qualities of the piece. These two pieces fall into the art category for me; I have to keep reminding myself that they're three feet long,. The proportions are so perfect that they could be swords, knives or letter openers and they would still be exquisite. Truly amazing when you think that they are recreations/ interpretations of weapons that have been out of use for a thousand years or so!


Congratulations!
View user's profile Send private message
G. Ghazarian
Industry Professional



Location: Florida USA
Joined: 01 Nov 2005

Posts: 215

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Sun 28 Mar, 2010 5:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hugo, you are right, it is dyed black. You see, ebonizing wood simply means "to make it black" but in reality ebonizing means "to make it black to look like ebony. Any wood can be stained black but not all of them necessarily look like ebony just because they are black. Pearwood has the correct grain and texture to simulate ebony. A combination of chemical stain (a solution of steel dissolved in vinegar) followed by a dilute black stain gives pearwood the deep brown/black color of real african ebony.

Ken, thank you very much for your compliments.

G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Seax after "The Knife of Charlemagne"
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum