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Scott Kowalski




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PostPosted: Sun 04 Dec, 2016 7:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That looks really good Andrew. Congratulations on an awesome shield. Did you do all of the carving on the leather parts?
Chris Landwehr 10/10/49-1/1/09 My Mom
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Mark Moore




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PostPosted: Sun 04 Dec, 2016 9:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm glad to see this thread up and going again. Some really great work here, and some of it very ingenious. Can't remember who posted it, but the shield-press made from boards and ratchet straps is great! Makes me want to get in the shop and tinker around a bit. Right now, the only shield I have is a wallhanger my wife bought me as a gift. That MAY have to change!...McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Paul O'Briant




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PostPosted: Sun 04 Dec, 2016 2:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice Andrew! The painting is what catches my eye the most. The rest of the shield is fantastic but the paint.. wow!
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Andrew Pribor




PostPosted: Sun 04 Dec, 2016 3:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Scott Kowalski wrote:
That looks really good Andrew. Congratulations on an awesome shield. Did you do all of the carving on the leather parts?


Thanks Scott, Yes I carved and tooled all of the designs.

Cheers,

Andrew

"The Bow brings grief and sorrow to the foeman; armed with Bow may we sudue all regions."
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Andrew Pribor




PostPosted: Sun 04 Dec, 2016 3:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Paul O'Briant wrote:
Very nice Andrew! The painting is what catches my eye the most. The rest of the shield is fantastic but the paint.. wow!


Thanks Paul, Though I did not use any paint. This was all done using leather dye. A very long and tedious process but the final results are worth it.
Andrew

"The Bow brings grief and sorrow to the foeman; armed with Bow may we sudue all regions."
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Scott Kowalski




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Dec, 2016 6:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Andrew Pribor wrote:
Scott Kowalski wrote:
That looks really good Andrew. Congratulations on an awesome shield. Did you do all of the carving on the leather parts?


Thanks Scott, Yes I carved and tooled all of the designs.

Cheers,

Andrew


That is truly impressive Andrew.

I have two questions.
How much does the shield weigh?
How long did it take to do all of the work on this?

Chris Landwehr 10/10/49-1/1/09 My Mom
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Andrew Pribor




PostPosted: Mon 05 Dec, 2016 6:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

[quote="Scott Kowalski"][quote="Andrew Pribor"]
Scott Kowalski wrote:


I have two questions.
How much does the shield weigh?
How long did it take to do all of the work on this?


The shield weighs in at 4.5lbs.

Hard to say how many hours were put into this project. I completed the carving/tooling earlier in the year and never got back to it due to summer projects,work,etc. I estimate around 40 + hours.

Thanks for the interest and compliments,

Andrew

"The Bow brings grief and sorrow to the foeman; armed with Bow may we sudue all regions."
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R. Charboneau




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PostPosted: Sat 04 Feb, 2017 4:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Heater shield WIP. I took the plans from ye old gaffers and made some modifications. The shield itself is made of 3 layers of 1/8" poplar glued then covered in layers of linen. Gesso then acrylic over that, polyacrylic clear, then 1shot lettering enamel over that.
Strapping will be an x pattern up for the hand and a thick strap with buckle for the forearm. Still debating whether to add a guige or not.
Ill post more pics when it is complete



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Waldemar Duszka




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PostPosted: Mon 06 Feb, 2017 7:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I made it from one piece of wood larch iron ax sleeve and hammer with wood.
It is made on the basis of archaeological finds from the Hjordspring.
http://www.hjortspring.dk/wold/shields.htm
Dimensions of this copy: weight: 3.1kg, length: 89cm, width: 39cm.



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Ibor
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Todd Feinman




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PostPosted: Mon 06 Feb, 2017 10:37 am    Post subject: Tutankhamun shield         Reply with quote

An attempt to reproduce one of the shields deposited with Tut. African mahogany, ash, rawhide, gold, casein, linen, fake cheetah hide, leather and shellac. The cartouche plaque was made using a 3D printed mold. While the originals are supposed to have the cartouches plaques made of "gesso", I have indeed made some modifications to try and approximate what a practical military shield might have been like:

http://imgur.com/DSZuRjO

http://imgur.com/PsPu9Iu

http://imgur.com/npImBHS

Todd
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Matthew Bunker




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PostPosted: Wed 15 Feb, 2017 2:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

My reconstruction of the 6th century shield from Grave 21/868, Tranmer House cemetery at Sutton Hoo, based on details published in the site report and a British Museum technical report on the construction.

The board is ash, as was the original, glued together with cheese glue made according to the recipe given in Theophilus. Ash is not a common wood for shields but 6 of the 7 shields from this cemetery (where species has been identified) were ash, with the other being oak, which is even more unusual.
This may be an indication that the shields were made for burial, not for combat. The planks are 8mm at the boss, thinning to 5mm at the rim.
In the case of this particular shield, the grip on the back was held in place with rivets which were never peened, so the acted more like pegs. Again, not something expected in a shield which saw use.
The fittings are copper alloy, gilded and with silver sheet soldered to the surface in parts as per the originals. All done by Dave Roper of Ganderwick.

The coverings of leather are glued on using cow hide glue, the one on the rear being applied after the fittings were placed.
The front covering was painted with a gesso made of chalk, powdered clay and hide glue as the original had traces of both calcite and aluminosilicate between the fittings and the board. I mixed some red ochre pigment from the ancient iron mine at Clerewell into this, which gives the gesso it's colour (although there is no evidence for what, if any, colour was added). The gesso layer was then sealed with a layer of beeswax varnish (beeswax and tallow) as beeswax was also found between the board and the fittings.

The stitching around the rim is with some waxed, handmade hemp thread.
Overall, quite pleased with the final results and it was interesting to bring different period methods together.



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"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
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Joshua McGee




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PostPosted: Sun 19 Feb, 2017 11:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Absolutely remarkable, Matthew!
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R. Charboneau




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PostPosted: Thu 02 Mar, 2017 2:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote







Finished it today. I will be adding a guige and some decoration in the corners at a later time, but this is it for now:)
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Samuel D R




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PostPosted: Mon 06 Mar, 2017 11:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matthew Bunker wrote:
My reconstruction of the 6th century shield from Grave 21/868, Tranmer House cemetery at Sutton Hoo, based on details published in the site report and a British Museum technical report on the construction.

The board is ash, as was the original, glued together with cheese glue made according to the recipe given in Theophilus. Ash is not a common wood for shields but 6 of the 7 shields from this cemetery (where species has been identified) were ash, with the other being oak, which is even more unusual.
This may be an indication that the shields were made for burial, not for combat. The planks are 8mm at the boss, thinning to 5mm at the rim.
In the case of this particular shield, the grip on the back was held in place with rivets which were never peened, so the acted more like pegs. Again, not something expected in a shield which saw use.
The fittings are copper alloy, gilded and with silver sheet soldered to the surface in parts as per the originals. All done by Dave Roper of Ganderwick.

The coverings of leather are glued on using cow hide glue, the one on the rear being applied after the fittings were placed.
The front covering was painted with a gesso made of chalk, powdered clay and hide glue as the original had traces of both calcite and aluminosilicate between the fittings and the board. I mixed some red ochre pigment from the ancient iron mine at Clerewell into this, which gives the gesso it's colour (although there is no evidence for what, if any, colour was added). The gesso layer was then sealed with a layer of beeswax varnish (beeswax and tallow) as beeswax was also found between the board and the fittings.

The stitching around the rim is with some waxed, handmade hemp thread.
Overall, quite pleased with the final results and it was interesting to bring different period methods together.


This is amazing. Outside of this shield and the one from the main Sutton-Hoo mound, were there any other shields excavated?
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Joshua McGee




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PostPosted: Sun 19 Mar, 2017 1:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote



Here is my humble first ever attempt at a ca. 1300 infantry heater shield that I finished this afternoon. Slightly curved and covered in linen; I based the shape on illustrations in manuscripts as well as the Arnold von Breinz. It is about 34 in long and 24 in wide at the top, weighs about 6 lbs.
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Mark Moore




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PostPosted: Sun 19 Mar, 2017 1:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I love the paint scheme on that, Joshua! Those colors really pop. Great job! Big Grin ....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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Matthew Bunker




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PostPosted: Tue 21 Mar, 2017 10:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Samuel D R wrote:


This is amazing. Outside of this shield and the one from the main Sutton-Hoo mound, were there any other shields excavated?


There were eleven shields in total at Tranmer House (you can find details of them in this British Museum technical report :- https://www.britishmuseum.org/pdf/BMTRB_5_Bullock_et_al.pdf)

10 of them featured some sort of decorative mounts, this one being the most complex. One other had a lozenge shaped mount as well as disc headed mounts and 8 others just had disc headed mounts varying in number from 2 to 6.

In the mound cemetery, I think that Mound 17 (the young prince and horse burial) is the only one apart from Mound 1 which still had a shield when excavated. It had a simple boss and four large disc headed mounts.

"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
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