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Ralph Grinly





Joined: 19 Jan 2011

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PostPosted: Mon 27 Apr, 2015 6:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A most interesting and informative thread- many thanks to all the contributors. I know this thread has been around for some time, but one aspect hasn't been covered, as far as I can tell.
Who, of today's commercial , over- the- counter makers ( not custom) makes the most accurate Falcattas or Kopis today ?
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Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Apr, 2015 6:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ralph Grinly wrote:
Who, of today's commercial , over- the- counter makers ( not custom) makes the most accurate Falcattas or Kopis today ?


Oog, well, "most accurate" may be better defined as "the worst except for all the others". Deepeeka has had a falcata which looks reasonable for a long time, very Iberian in style with a by-knife on the scabbard. They also have a couple kopis versions which don't look too bad at first glance, but I'd have to see them in more detail to judge. I'd be willing to bet they're too heavy, at least.

The movies of the last few years really haven't helped the workshops in India, etc., visualize what a *real* kopis looks like...

Matthew
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Michael Schmidtman




Location: United States
Joined: 20 Jan 2017

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PostPosted: Fri 20 Jan, 2017 10:52 am    Post subject: Khukri Thrusting         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
I don't know a whole lot about these swords, so please keep that in mind when reading this question. While I think it's obvious that these types of blades are extremely adept at chopping and cutting, I'm curious about the ability for them in the thrust. It would seem to me that the shape of the blade, like a khukri, would put the tip in a very natural position for an easy thrust. In other words, while the shaping of the blade makes for a more efficient chopper, it would seem to me that it doesn't detract from the thrusting ability. Thoughts?


Thrusting can be difficult for a couple of reasons. First, the distance to your target is not proportional to the length of the blade. While the user can overcome this, it's best realize as a buyer that a khukri with a 12 inch blade does not have a 12 inch "reach". Reach is more like 9 inches because of the dog leg in the blade.
Second, the downward cant of the blade can cause problems if a thrust encounters bone or body armor. The linear force of the thrust can be deflected by difficulty when penetrating, levering the blade downward and potentially out of your hand. British soldiers who were issued khukri's took specialized training in their use, including the thrusting issue. Thrusting IS possible, but the khukri's main purpose is chopping or slashing.
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Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
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PostPosted: Fri 20 Jan, 2017 12:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Many Greek kopides in artwork have a straight or nearly straight back, so thrusting would be no different than with a straight sword. The weight and balance were all in the same ballpark, too. It's the Spanish version which is more angular, but even there, I'd be surprised if it were so extreme as to affect your reach significantly.

Matthew
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Sat 21 Jan, 2017 2:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Khukri Thrusting         Reply with quote

Michael Schmidtman wrote:
First, the distance to your target is not proportional to the length of the blade. While the user can overcome this, it's best realize as a buyer that a khukri with a 12 inch blade does not have a 12 inch "reach". Reach is more like 9 inches because of the dog leg in the blade.


Usual practice is to measure the length of the blade in a straight line from the base to the tip; with this convention, a 12" blade does have 12" reach. Similarly, it's usual to measure curved sabre blades, katana blades, etc. in a straight line. It's easier, and more useful information.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Michael Schmidtman




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PostPosted: Sun 22 Jan, 2017 10:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Khukri Thrusting         Reply with quote

Timo Nieminen wrote:
Michael Schmidtman wrote:
First, the distance to your target is not proportional to the length of the blade. While the user can overcome this, it's best realize as a buyer that a khukri with a 12 inch blade does not have a 12 inch "reach". Reach is more like 9 inches because of the dog leg in the blade.


Usual practice is to measure the length of the blade in a straight line from the base to the tip; with this convention, a 12" blade does have 12" reach. Similarly, it's usual to measure curved sabre blades, katana blades, etc. in a straight line. It's easier, and more useful information.


I get what you are saying, and I don't disagree, but my son has been in Nepal on disaster relief missions and he has witnessed khukri makers measure blade length along the spine. That seems to be routine practice in that area.
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Jan, 2017 5:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Makes a difference. Checking with the closest kukri at hand, measuring along the spin gives 35cm, and measuring from the base of the blade to the point in a straight line gives 32cm. Half of that difference is due to measuring the straight line distance from the base of the blade at the front rather than at the spine; the straight line distance from the base of the spin to the tip is 33.5cm.

(The middle of the base of the blade is sometimes used as a compromise. )

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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