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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
Joined: 19 Aug 2010
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Posts: 358

PostPosted: Sun 16 Dec, 2012 12:22 pm    Post subject: A handful of knives         Reply with quote

Another batch of medieval knives reproductions... They are not perfect, but it was fun making them.
They have usual construction, with riveted handles made of brass combined with bone or wood.
(Sorry for crappy pictures, I shall make some fotos during daylinght.)



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Josh Wilson




Location: WV
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PostPosted: Sun 16 Dec, 2012 1:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice! Did you forge the blades yourself?
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
Joined: 19 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Sun 16 Dec, 2012 10:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

strictly speaking, they were not forged:) They were grinded and then quenched and tempered. But one day I will finally build my forge, and then... Happy
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Perry L. Goss




Location: Missouri
Joined: 15 May 2004
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PostPosted: Mon 17 Dec, 2012 5:40 am    Post subject: "not perfect" blades...         Reply with quote

Radovan:

Nice work. There is something about the..."not perfect" gear. It has its own appeal. Not everyone could have a full plate armour, not everyone could have a silver hilted Samuel Bell bowie.

I like them!
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Mon 17 Dec, 2012 6:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thank you for encouraging words! In fact, there is a certain level that you can achieve with angle grinder, then one would need more sophisticated tools:) At the same time, "uebung macht den meister", so I just keep on tryin Happy
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Leo Todeschini
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Location: Oxford, UK
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PostPosted: Mon 17 Dec, 2012 3:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looking good.
www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
www.instagram.com/todsworkshop
www.facebook.com/TodTodeschini
www.youtube.com/user/todsstuff1
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
Joined: 19 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Wed 19 Dec, 2012 12:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

...and here is another one, just finished. It is my first "serious" attempt for a tang construction. Handle is a combination of brass, bone and rose-wood.

Doing this project, I have stumbled onto one problem: how to cold-peen the tang, without damaging the blade? The best I came up with was wrapping the blade in a sheet of paper and clawing it really hard in a vice. Is there possibly a better method? Any advice appreciated... thanks.



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Dustin R. Reagan





Joined: 09 May 2006

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PostPosted: Wed 19 Dec, 2012 2:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Radovan Geist wrote:

Doing this project, I have stumbled onto one problem: how to cold-peen the tang, without damaging the blade? The best I came up with was wrapping the blade in a sheet of paper and clawing it really hard in a vice. Is there possibly a better method? Any advice appreciated... thanks.


Nice knives! They look like they came straight out of the river Thames! =]
Really, i think you nailed the handle construction dead-on on a lot of those knives (I especially like the really skinny, delicate handles).

A couple options for holding the blade in a vice without damage:

-Leather-faced jaws.
-Brass, Aluminum or Lead inserts for your vice jaws (basically any soft metal).
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Thu 20 Dec, 2012 3:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thank you! i have a piece of thick leather from an old belt, somewhere in my workshop, that should work well. thanks again!
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Sun 17 Mar, 2013 11:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dear all, let me contribute with my latest creations. The first one is a large cooking knife. It still needs some polishing on its blade, and I will probably re-shape the handle - so please take it as a work in progress:)
The second one was for my fiends birthday. I wanted to make it more special (and try a new technique), so it has a brass inlay work on its blade. Its not perfect, but Im rather happy with the result.



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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Sun 05 May, 2013 10:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

After a while I managed to finish two more knives. The first one is a slender eating knife, inspired by some 15th cent German examples, with full-brass scales. The method was rather un-sophisticated (scales are riveted, not soldered), but I more or less like the result.

The second one is a larger eating knife, with brass and horn scales and some brass decoration. Here Id like to ask for your advice: how would you polish horn to a high gloss? I was working with a sand paper, but achieved only this "satin look". Thanks in advance...



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Tjarand Matre




Location: Nttery, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

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PostPosted: Mon 06 May, 2013 2:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Really nice details!
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Justin King
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Location: flagstaff,arizona
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PostPosted: Mon 06 May, 2013 6:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Horn finishes well with sandpaper and steel wool, I usually sand to about 600p and then polish with 000 steel wool. Very nice work by the way!
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Mon 06 May, 2013 10:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thank you. i did use sandpaper, but I shall try steel wool.
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Bjorn Hagstrom




Location: Hr, Skane
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PostPosted: Tue 07 May, 2013 1:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lovely, lovely knives. One can't possibly have too many knives..
There is nothing quite as sad as a one man conga-line...
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
Joined: 19 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Jun, 2013 8:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

...and heres another one. this time a larger cooking knife.Shape was inspired by some 15th cent. artwork.
The blade was made from a scrap piece of rusted metal, which was probably a broken blade from grass-cutter. I found it laying in the corner of our garden. I have cleaned it chemically and mechanically, but it still retains a "rustic look" (I know that its often just a code-word for "not very well-kept" Happy)
The scales are from brass and elm, riveted by solid brass rivets. The knife still needs a sheath, but it will have to wait for a smaller brother, to make a nice cooking-set. All comments and criticism are welcome.



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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
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PostPosted: Tue 12 Nov, 2013 10:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ive finished another one. This one will be part of a separate project of "upgrade" on one of my Langes Messer (a new handle, scabbard and a by-knife with pricker), but given the number of projects waiting on my work-bench, I dont think it could materialise very fast:)
However, until then I have a rather large knife (27 cm), with a bolster and a butt from mild steel and a pear-wood handle treated with oil. Pins are from mild steel.



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Kai Lawson




Location: Madison, WI
Joined: 26 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Nov, 2013 4:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That 'friend's birthday knife' and the knives immediately following it have really neat shapes--were they historically inspired?
"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
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Radovan Geist




Location: Slovakia
Joined: 19 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Nov, 2013 10:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Kai, yes they were inspired by different pieces found in artwork. My main source was this database: http://tethys.imareal.sbg.ac.at/realonline/
Some of the blades were also inspired by originals - here my main source is Herman Historica auctions.
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Julien M




Location: Austin TX
Joined: 14 Sep 2005

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PostPosted: Sun 19 Jan, 2014 2:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Was browsing around for your past work Radovan and I think it's really excellent. You have an eye for eating knife design for sure.

It's funny because I recall you said on another of your topic that your work was amateurish (found it: "I have to stress that its just very amateurish, learning by doing exercise"). Well you, lean fast! so I really don't agree as the above knives tell me otherwise. Your Bauerwehr makes the point even more. They also tell me you are comfortable with most of the techniques needed to achieve a pro level project (pinning, riveting, cutting and shaping a blade, heat treatment).

The one thing that is a bit of a let down is your finish (blade and sometimes the sides of your wooden handle are a bit rought), which is really awkward as it is the easiest part really. It looks like you are in a hurry to finish Happy Granted finishing is often very boring but well worth the effort. You work mostly with an angle grinder, and it leaves grinding marks.

Short answer: you need a belt grinder. I have no room for a backstand at present, but I am finishing blades and hilt components with a small 20 aldi hand held belt sander, that has attachments to clamp it on a workbench belt facing up. I thought little of it when I bought it when grocery shopping, but I would be unable to complete most of my projects without it. I just bought quality belts on ebay, grit 40 would deal with those grind marks with little efforts. It has variable speed. Now this piece of equipment would make any professional blade smith have a good laugh, but what the hell - it does the job. I've done scabbard cores with it, shaped mild steel guards (angle grinder+this to refine and finish).

Sandpaper also does the trick, but will take more efforts. I use sanding sponge preferably, they speed up the work.
Otherwise clamp you blade on a long wooden slats that will extend beyond your workshop. Use double side adhesive to secure your sandpaper to a piece of hard wood that you will hold with both hands pressing on your blade. Then back and forth with a little oil...boooring yes. but this will work Happy

Hope the above will help. In any case I'll follow your projects with great interest.

Cheers,

J
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