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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 6:40 pm    Post subject: Preventing Rust         Reply with quote

I've a pair of greaves and rarebrace (forearm only; right term?) that have had the anti-rust stuff disturbed by (dumb) people who like to fondle my things without asking. As such, a few spots have some rust on them. While I can remove the rust with Metal Glo, what is recommended to prevent rust in the future?

M.

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D. Austin
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 7:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would suggest Renaissance Wax. Other things will do, such as oil or WD-40 but they have their own issues. Oil tends to feel oily (surprise, surprise) and I don't like the smell of WD-40. It's fine for tools but not for something I'd wear.
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 7:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I know folks who use Turtle Wax on armour. Actually, I know someone who uses car wax on antique arms and armour.
Happy

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P. Cha




PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 8:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wax is pretty resiliant vs touchy touchy. Oil is good because it makes them wash their hands so you can see who touched your stuff. WD-40 is nigh useless as it evaporates pretty dang quickly and all it does is displace water anyways...not so much a protectant. Personally I say go with an electric fence...teach others to go and touch your stuff without asking Razz .
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Sean Smith





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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 8:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Turtle Wax works wonderfully, until you finally have to get it off. Then it is a royal pain.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 8:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Smith wrote:
Turtle Wax works wonderfully, until you finally have to get it off. Then it is a royal pain.


yes but why do you have to ever take it off ? If some rust spots do appear anyway the scotchbright pads will remove the turtle wax as well as the rust and a bit of metal and then just re-wax.

The only thing I can see is having to take it off if one wants to blue the steel or give it a patina.

I looked at some of my armour that is on my bedroom floor and gets dusty ( Dust means rust spots after a time ) and since I treated the steel with turtle wax the number of rust spots appearing is very much less in number and size and very quickly removed with the scotchbright. ( Very very light surface rust compared to before I started to use the turtle wax ).

The renaissance wax works well also but is expensive and seems more sensitive to handling ( Wears off more easily ??? ).

If oil use one made for firearms and it only takes a light film of it, and many of these oils penetrate the pores of the steel and leave some protection even if almost wiped off.

Silicone cloths also work.

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D. Austin
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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 9:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A cheaper alternative to the Ren Wax is the type of moncrystalline wax used in lost wax casting. This can probably be sourced from your local jewellers suppliers. I have also used beeswax in the past to good effect. It can be slightly more difficult to apply though as it is a solid and really needs to be applied to hot metal and polished well.

Somewhere at home I have a bottle of liquid beeswax which should also do the trick but I've only tried it on leather and I'm not sure what they put in it to liquefy it.
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Addison C. de Lisle




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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 9:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You could try Tuf-Cloth. It's what I use on my swords, so I assume it'd work well on armor as well. You rub it on, wait a minute, and rub it off. It leaves the metal dry to the touch, and seems to be quite effective. They also have a marine version (what I use due to my relative proximity to salt water, and just in case).

http://www.sentrysolutions.com/TufClothkew.shtml

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Adam S.





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PostPosted: Thu 08 May, 2008 10:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

D. Austin wrote:
A cheaper alternative to the Ren Wax is the type of moncrystalline wax used in lost wax casting. This can probably be sourced from your local jewellers suppliers. I have also used beeswax in the past to good effect. It can be slightly more difficult to apply though as it is a solid and really needs to be applied to hot metal and polished well.

Somewhere at home I have a bottle of liquid beeswax which should also do the trick but I've only tried it on leather and I'm not sure what they put in it to liquefy it.


Beeswax is often deluded with oil. A simple mixture of olive or mink oil with beeswax makes an amazing leather treatment. Mink is best for leather.

I have never used it on steel...
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Lawrence Parramore





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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 3:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi, most spray wax for furniture is 'Micro crystalline' I believe, so easy to get hold of, you can also get it with beeswax, in the UK at least.

The only issue is to clean and dry everything properly as after waxing it can still be working away underneath.

The wax will get scratched ofcourse which means there is always a need to maintain your gear.

Are there not some lacquers or varnishes nowadays that would be good for this?
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Allen Andrews




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 4:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Since being a GM in the USCG I have used Breakfree CLP. I have also used (and use) the product Addison mentioned, Marine Tufcloth. I used to carry a folding knife with a 52100 blade, and the Tufcloth worked very well. I have never tried wax, but I think especially with armor pieces it sounds like good route to go. I like the idea of Turtle Wax Happy
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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 7:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

How about silicone spray? I used it on my sword (spray on, wait, wipe off) and it seemed to have worked, but people are smart enough not to go and finger sharp objects.

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Ed Toton




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 7:42 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've used a variety of things. I'll agree that WD-40 is pretty useless as protection against rust since it evaporates away. Mineral oil works well, but doesn't always apply smoothly. Same with gun oil. Functional but not as pretty. RenWax works well, but also contains a mild polishing agent, which you may not want. It's also more expensive than Turtle Wax, which works great. Then again RenWax is thicker/harder wax, and may not wipe off as easily from light handling.
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 7:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have tried a sign that reads "$25 SERVICE FEE CHARGED FOR EACH RUSTY FINGERPRINT FOUND ON MY BLADES". It does deter some but there are still the hardheads who will pick up an oiled blade and run their fingers down the edge to see if it is sharp!
Lin Robinson

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Lawrence Parramore





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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 7:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Only half serious, what about a grumpy dog, should do the trick only it is more expensive than wax, but may come in useful for other things, like guarding your home?

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Li Jin




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 8:06 am    Post subject: HI         Reply with quote

Good morning sir

I use metal Glo to clean off the rust on the pommel of a sword i own, and it worked very well. But in future
prevent rusting, I would say the Renaissance wax work very well. So now I'm worried about storing my sword in a leather scabbard for about 3 to 4 weeks Happy
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Gary A. Chelette




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 8:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I though stuff like car wax (Turtle Wax) would leave a discoloration as most have a color base.
Even old floor wax (Johnsons) yellows with age.



Even Topcoate will leave a white powder residue on metal. T-9 is too expensive and doesn't do much better.

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Francisco Simões




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 10:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello
For how long do you say that Renaissance wax would protect a wall hanging sword? And what would you recomend to take it off for making a new wax coat? (just plain scotchbright???)
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Gary A. Chelette




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 11:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't know about RenWax, but most other waxes can be removed with a little soap and Ammonia.
Are you scared, Connor?
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Oh, aye. Angus pees his kilt all the time!
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Ed Toton




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PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008 12:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

RenWax will protect if for a long time with no handling. I don't have a real good estimate though. If you handle it more, it needs more care, obviously. I've found I can leave swords sitting out for a couple of years if they're not handled, using mineral oil or renwax. Trying to do this with WD-40 has resulted in rust spots.

For cleaning it off to re-apply, I've actually had good success with liquid dish soap and some warm water. As long as you dry it thoroughly and re-apply the wax or oil, this is not a problem.

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