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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue 11 Mar, 2008 10:53 pm    Post subject: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Hi all Im a noob here so I hope this is in the right place. Im looking for a good cutting sabre which is quick enough to practise with. (alone of course) Id like to be able to practise both moulinets and feints as well as I would in a duel while still being able to practise cutting with it as well.

Ive read some good things about the cold steel and windlass 1796 patterns but Im wondering if anyone practising WMA here can recoomend anything?
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Chris Murray




Location: Toronto
Joined: 26 Dec 2007

Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 10:39 am    Post subject: Re: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Mark Williamson wrote:
Hi all Im a noob here so I hope this is in the right place. Im looking for a good cutting sabre which is quick enough to practise with. (alone of course) Id like to be able to practise both moulinets and feints as well as I would in a duel while still being able to practise cutting with it as well.

Ive read some good things about the cold steel and windlass 1796 patterns but Im wondering if anyone practising WMA here can recoomend anything?


Hi, I am new here as well, but I do have a Cold Steel 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre, so I will offer an opinion. This is a fantastic slashing weapon (due to the curvature, which gives a naturally long draw) and a wicked chopper, due the weight of the hatchet point. I can only imagine how effective this weapon would be from horseback Big Grin . That very weight of the hatchet point, however, does give this sabre significant blade presence and I don't see it as being suitable for fencing where small, controlled movements would be required (for your moulinets and feints). It would not be quick in the recovery and your wrist and forearm would tire rapidly trying to recover from feints. I've never handled a Windlass 1796 pattern sabre, so I can't speak for that one.

Chris.
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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 12:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks chris. I had heard the same thing about the CS 1796 being slow to recover, Ive been reding the reviews here and at other sites. My other problem is that I dont have much to spend. .
If anybody else has any Ideas let me know.
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Elling Polden




Location: Bergen, Norway
Joined: 19 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 1:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, you have Hanweii Hutton practice sabres.
They are ligth and cheap, but not sabres for the field.

"this [fight] looks curious, almost like a game. See, they are looking around them before they fall, to find a dry spot to fall on, or they are falling on their shields. Can you see blood on their cloths and weapons? No. This must be trickery."
-Reidar Sendeman, from King Sverre's Saga, 1201
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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 2:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Elling Polden wrote:
Well, you have Hanweii Hutton practice sabres.
They are ligth and cheap, but not sabres for the field.


Hmmm. They do look a bit too light. Ive ehard some good things about the CS napolean, any thoughts? Or would I be better off looking for a tulwar?
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 3:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like the idea of the Hutton Sabre. It's nice, and practicing with a lighter sabre is not a bad thing at all. And then you can search for a sharp weapon of similar type. The live steel comparison for the hutton sabre is the 1861 Austrian Infantry Sabre. It has a longer "back" to it so it is heavier. But the blade profile is much the same. Here ars some pics.


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prussian sabre 1.jpg


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prussian sabre 2.jpg


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prussian sabre 3.jpg


inkothemgard!
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Ian Hutchison




Location: Louisiana / Nordrhein-Westholland
Joined: 27 Nov 2007

Posts: 485

PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 3:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark Williamson wrote:
Elling Polden wrote:
Well, you have Hanweii Hutton practice sabres.
They are ligth and cheap, but not sabres for the field.


Hmmm. They do look a bit too light. Ive ehard some good things about the CS napolean, any thoughts? Or would I be better off looking for a tulwar?


http://www.militaryheritage.com/swords1.htm



Try this one and give me a review Wink

Or perhaps this one: http://www.militaryheritage.com/images/1802sabre_1.jpg

Both are ca. $250[/img]
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 3:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

www.gggodwin.com offers some repro 18th century swords that look quite nice. Military Heritage's site has been mentioned already, but they do offer British style swords, too! Happy http://www.militaryheritage.com/swords2.htm

Jonathan
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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 4:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks guys, you have all made some great suggestions. I am really trying to find a curved blade since i hope to make use of the curve to practise wrist cuts and offline thrusts. Its not for reenactment purposes so I dont feel the need to be historically accurate. Im just looking for a light quick curved sword that will be responsive enough to practise with yet strong enough to cut with.

*I know Im not asking for much Laughing Out Loud *
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 5:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you are not concerned about historical accuracy, check out Angus Trim's tactical line: http://www.angustrimdirect.com/tacswords.htm I believe you'll have to order through www.christianfletcher.com, however.

Jonathan
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Shahril Dzulkifli




Location: Malaysia
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 1,265

PostPosted: Sat 15 Mar, 2008 1:58 am    Post subject: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Mark, if you are looking for a good sabre to practice with I suggest that you use this Hussar sabre.
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Mike West




Location: North Carolina
Joined: 06 Dec 2003
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 84

PostPosted: Sat 15 Mar, 2008 2:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Shahril Dzulkifli wrote:
Mark, if you are looking for a good sabre to practice with I suggest that you use this Hussar sabre.


That's a nice sabre. What is the country of origin?

It seems as if the sabres with straighter blades (less curvature) handle better for fencing on foot, being more maneuverable and, having a faster recovery.
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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sat 15 Mar, 2008 2:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Shahril Dzulkifli wrote:
Mark, if you are looking for a good sabre to practice with I suggest that you use this Hussar sabre.



That is nice. Which manufacturer?
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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sat 15 Mar, 2008 2:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Mike West wrote:
Shahril Dzulkifli wrote:
Mark, if you are looking for a good sabre to practice with I suggest that you use this Hussar sabre.


That's a nice sabre. What is the country of origin?

It seems as if the sabres with straighter blades (less curvature) handle better for fencing on foot, being more maneuverable and, having a faster recovery.


I am actually looking for something with some curve.
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Shahril Dzulkifli




Location: Malaysia
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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Posts: 1,265

PostPosted: Sun 16 Mar, 2008 2:09 am    Post subject: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

To Mike, I think this sword is either of Polish or Hungarian origin.
To Mark, the sword's manufacturer is unknown.


Last edited by Shahril Dzulkifli on Sun 16 Mar, 2008 6:21 am; edited 1 time in total
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Konstantin Tsvetkov




PostPosted: Sun 16 Mar, 2008 4:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark,

I would go for a british P1853 or later 19th century british cavalry sword.

Speaking of modern swords, I would, probably, choose Cold Steel Napoleonic cavalry saber. It is not so much curved as their prussian cavalry.

Konstantin.
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Mike West




Location: North Carolina
Joined: 06 Dec 2003
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 84

PostPosted: Sun 16 Mar, 2008 9:40 am    Post subject: Re: Good Sabre         Reply with quote

Shahril Dzulkifli wrote:
To Mike, I think this sword is either of Polish or Hungarian origin.
To Mark, the sword's manufacturer is unknown.



What era would that sabre have been used? Based on what you've wrote, it sounds like it could be very effective fencing sabre while on foot.
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Nathan M Wuorio




Location: Maine.
Joined: 17 Mar 2008
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 151

PostPosted: Mon 17 Mar, 2008 7:16 pm    Post subject: Sabre         Reply with quote

Might I recommend a Cossack Shashka? I have an original, but Deepeeka makes one for a very reasonable price.
If you go to www.by-the-sword.com they have a large selection of Deepeeka swords, including an entire page full of sabres.
[ I forgot to mention the price, which is $144.00]

Hope you find what your looking for.

Nathan.
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Mark Williamson





Joined: 11 Mar 2008

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue 18 Mar, 2008 3:36 pm    Post subject: Re: Sabre         Reply with quote

Nathan M Wuorio wrote:
Might I recommend a Cossack Shashka? I have an original, but Deepeeka makes one for a very reasonable price.
If you go to www.by-the-sword.com they have a large selection of Deepeeka swords, including an entire page full of sabres.
[ I forgot to mention the price, which is $144.00]

Hope you find what your looking for.


How is depeeka's quality? I only ask becasue their prices seem to be more in line with wall hangers.
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Nathan M Wuorio




Location: Maine.
Joined: 17 Mar 2008
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 151

PostPosted: Tue 18 Mar, 2008 8:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've found that the quality is surprisingly good. Carbon steel blades, pretty sharp to the touch, and holds up rather well with cutting tests. I don't think that Deepeeka is quite at the level of Albion, but for their price range the swords are pretty much unbeatable.
Nathan.
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