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Thom R.




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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks really good. I like the faceted grip. came together very well. can you show us the peen block you finally opted for as I am going to get back to working on mine soon and I am trying to figure out what I want to do on the pommel end as well. tr
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Luke Zechman




Location: Lock Haven Pennsylvania
Joined: 18 Jan 2009

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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice work Sean... I want one! I do have to agree with Julien on this one though. Long term project and no buckle? Beutiful work all aside!
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Maurizio D'Angelo




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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I followed your topic. I always learn something new. My compliments, Sean.
Ciao
Maurizio
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Josh MacNeil




Location: Massachusetts, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean - If I were you, my ego would be the size of Texas right now. That is some amazing work. Truly inspirational. For the grip and and scabbard covering, did you use chamois like your other projects, or did you use a different leather?
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 10:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
More shots please!

This might be the best work I've seen from you here Sean...

Why stop at the buckle though??? Compared to the amount of work invested in this project this makes little sense to overlook that very last bit Happy

Anyway...cheers and well done.

J

Is that belt another dog leash?


Thanks! I suppose I'll have to make a buckle after all Big Grin It really isn't very difficult, but I want to make sure I can do something appropriate for the sword. Yes, it's another leash! "London Lead," I think it's called.

For the photos--any particular details you'd like to see? Did you see the earlier photos of the sword in my hand?

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 11:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thom R. wrote:
Looks really good. I like the faceted grip. came together very well. can you show us the peen block you finally opted for as I am going to get back to working on mine soon and I am trying to figure out what I want to do on the pommel end as well. tr


I'll get a shot of the block/nut and post early next week. If you have one of these, you know that the peen is filed to blend with the top of the pommel. I took my peen inspiration from a German two-hand sword with a similar pommel. That sword has a short conical nut with crude roping (not blended with the fluting), so I cut the wings off of a wing nut, filed the design and peened over that. First, though, I used the Dremel cylindrical stone grinding bit to create a level seat for the nut. I just held the Dremel vertically and pressed the bit down over the pommel hole. Simple. Peening was very difficult, even with a hot tang. I think Windlass tangs tend to be very hard, so keep that in mind and leave as little tang to work with as needed. My conical nut got kind of squashed in the process but it still looks reasonable. I filed and sanded the peen so the seam is all but invisible.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 11:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:
Good work Sean!
You captured style and period nicely. You´ve got a good eye for character.


Thank you, Peter! I just hope I can do something worthwhile with that Swedish sword project.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 11:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

An earlier photo, for those viewing the project for the first time:


 Attachment: 182.93 KB
download-2.gif


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 11:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Josh MacNeil wrote:
Sean - If I were you, my ego would be the size of Texas right now. That is some amazing work. Truly inspirational. For the grip and and scabbard covering, did you use chamois like your other projects, or did you use a different leather?


I'm afraid I do still use waxed and polished (sometimes burnished) chamois for grip and scabbard. Blush I know it's wrong, but I'm still trying to save cash where I can. For about $15 I can get a chamois that will cover this large scabbard and probably at least six grips this size. The effect isn't too bad, though it precludes tooling. It displays well, and the relatively coarse material takes the glue and dye extremely well (I dye first, by the way). The chappe is top-grain tooling leather because you have to have a relatively thick and stiff material there.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Josh MacNeil




Location: Massachusetts, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 12:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I see. No need to feel ashamed there, Sean. There's nothing wrong with saving money and you are able to get good results out of it. Gratz again on such an awesome project!
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G. Ghazarian
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Location: Florida USA
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 12:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Sean,

You should be very proud of your work and the ingenuity with which you realize your projects. I always follow your work with great pleasure knowing without a doubt that it will be a total success at the end.

Bravo and keep up the good work.

Gabriel

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http://gloryships.com/
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Brian K.
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 1:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I echo Gabriel's thoughts on this. You do exceptional work, and it's fantastic watching your work.
Brian Kunz
www.dbkcustomswords.com
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Felix R.




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PostPosted: Wed 24 Feb, 2010 11:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

congratualtions Sean on a very nice modification again. It is always impressive to see in what nice pieces you can turn those "cheapo" MRL swords. But I am with Julien, you will definitely need an appropriate buckle.
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Julien M




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PostPosted: Thu 25 Feb, 2010 1:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Sean,

A close shot of the peen block would be nice, a close up of one guard quillon two, the scabbard shape also interest me, as well as the sewing at the back of the scabbard (if there is any).

No rush though Happy

Cheers,

Julien
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 25 Feb, 2010 1:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Really nice work as you take mediocre but basically O.K. swords and turn them into very period looking and desirable swords. Big Grin Cool ( Well, swords mostly, but you do also other types of " upgrades " to other weapons and armour. Cool ).
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Thu 25 Feb, 2010 2:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean...outstanding!

If you ever decide to sell this sword, please let me know.

New York Historical Fencing Association
www.newyorklongsword.com

Byakkokan Dojo
http://newyorkbattodo.com/
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David Sutton




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PostPosted: Fri 26 Feb, 2010 4:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Excellent work Sean!

I agree with Julien, I think this is your best piece yet.

'Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all'

'To teach superstitions as truth is a most terrible thing'

Hypatia of Alexandria, c400AD
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Tue 02 Mar, 2010 7:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think this covers the image requests.

As you can see from my scabbard seam, Julien, my "software" lags behind my "hardware" in this case. The first scabbard I made was much neater. I think I rushed the job here, trimming the leather before it was fully dry. This is one of the major disadvantages of the chamois. It's quite stretchy, and if the leather is still damp enough to stretch during the trimming it creates a wandering line and some rough places. It's fine when completely dry. The part of the seam shown here is an average section. There are some smaller and rougher places near the tip as well as some places where the seam is all but invisible. I'm not sure what I did wrong here. Looks like the leather is buckled or folded under. You need this light to see it clearly or I'd have fixed it. This is all on the back of what to me is primarily a display/safety feature of the project, so I'm not too put out by the problems. Still, I'd like to become a better scabbard maker.

I'm still struggling with peening, but that's largely due to the hardness of the Windlass tangs. We'll see if the Tinker-Hanwei tangs are softer.

The chape is adapted from the Windlass "Saxon Hilt Sword" scabbard. I shortened it and cut the gothic design. Up close, in the right light, you can see the brass(?) used to braze on the finial.

And, last, I thought you DIY folks would be interested in seeing the contents of my toy box. There are a few good possibilities here as well as some things I'm not sure how I'll use: A field sword a la Wallhausen (ca. 1617), an Italian sword a la Agrippa (1553,) a Swedish sword, maybe an Alexandria XVIIIc... Who knows? I'm still pondering the Swedish project, so I might go for one of the single-hand swords next.



 Attachment: 62.78 KB
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 Attachment: 64.9 KB
pommel.gif


 Attachment: 46.32 KB
chape.gif


 Attachment: 171.21 KB
download.gif


 Attachment: 135.31 KB
toybox.gif


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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