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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Sat 06 Jun, 2020 7:14 am    Post subject: Silver Hoard found in Denmark         Reply with quote

Lots of bits and coins. Metal dectorists found them in a field called in archeologist and they have found a hoard of silver. LOts of coins from far flung places and silver decorative pieces and bits.

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Tyler C.




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PostPosted: Sat 06 Jun, 2020 9:05 am    Post subject: Re: Silver Hoard found in Denmark         Reply with quote

Craig Johnson wrote:
Lots of bits and coins. Metal dectorists found them in a field called in archeologist and they have found a hoard of silver. LOts of coins from far flung places and silver decorative pieces and bits.

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Very cool. This type of find makes me wonder how many of these discoveries happen and are never reported.
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Iagoba Ferreira





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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jul, 2020 4:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Another heavy cavalry sword from early XIXth century found in Balearic islands. Dunno if French or Spanish, as both are quite similar and the restoration on the other 11 swords found earlier in the area in 2019 is still going on...

All hail Guillem the first of Majorca!!! Laughing Out Loud

https://www.diariodeibiza.es/formentera-hoy/2020/07/02/aparece-espada-costa-calo/1152967.html?fbclid=IwAR3AyHIEf-xIPs5FIx_hH3YTzJQdHl_mwbbaeXBHhZ6ThBxCT31-HC1r0rg
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Iagoba Ferreira





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PostPosted: Fri 03 Jul, 2020 4:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A nice article about the swords found last year:

https://www.diariodeibiza.es/cultura/2019/09/18/11-espadas-traves-rayos-x/1092320.html
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Tyler C.




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Aug, 2020 8:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A detectorist recently found a bronze age hoard in Scotland near Peebles. Among other artifacts the hoard contained a sword in it's scabbard. Really looking forward to more publications on this find. Very exciting.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-53714864
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Tyler C.




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PostPosted: Wed 12 Aug, 2020 1:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A well preserved 10th century sword was recently found in lake Lednica in Poland. Apparently there are remnants of a leather covered scabbard too. From the pictures it almost looks like there is a leather covering that extended up over the cross. Could just be some remaining mud to be cleaned off. Hopefully there will be a more detailed report after someone has been able to clean it and perform some analysis on the preserved materials.

https://www.thefirstnews.com/article/rare-medieval-sword-and-artefacts-from-first-piast-dynasty-found-fully-intact-at-bottom-of-lake-14787
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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Sun 23 Aug, 2020 3:21 pm    Post subject: Henge find in Portugal         Reply with quote

This is interesting a timber henge of pretty good size and detail, in a part of Europe that they had not been found in. One wonders how many of these would have been seen in the landscape at their height of use.

Portuguese Henge find
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Daniel Parry




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PostPosted: Sun 23 Aug, 2020 3:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is interesting. I find it really interesting with the similarities between henges or at least enclosure shaped sites with causeway approaches, to wonder how much cultural communication/interaction there was between peoples at this time, whether between regions in Britain or the rest of Europe. Or whether it was that people migrating took traditions and beliefs with them as they spread rather than actual communication between regions. Or a bit of both. I saw a really interesting programme before on the DNA analysis of stone age skeletons of neolithic Britons, showing their migration from the Mediterranean and before that regions like Anatolia, westwards to Britain.

I always found visiting places like Skara Brae and Stonehenge and the monolithic sites in Brittany quite awesome, even more so in a way than places like Mycenae or Knossos, because you think how these people clawed their way from thousands of years of subsistence living to have the stability and food reserves/production capability to even think about producing these sites with primitive tools.
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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Fri 28 Aug, 2020 5:41 am    Post subject: Our limited knowledge         Reply with quote

Daniel Parry wrote:
That is interesting. I find it really interesting with the similarities between henges or at least enclosure shaped sites with causeway approaches, to wonder how much cultural communication/interaction there was between peoples at this time, whether between regions in Britain or the rest of Europe. Or whether it was that people migrating took traditions and beliefs with them as they spread rather than actual communication between regions. Or a bit of both. I saw a really interesting programme before on the DNA analysis of stone age skeletons of neolithic Britons, showing their migration from the Mediterranean and before that regions like Anatolia, westwards to Britain.

I always found visiting places like Skara Brae and Stonehenge and the monolithic sites in Brittany quite awesome, even more so in a way than places like Mycenae or Knossos, because you think how these people clawed their way from thousands of years of subsistence living to have the stability and food reserves/production capability to even think about producing these sites with primitive tools.


Could not agree more Daniel, the epic nature of these remnants from the past must have been a major focus of their lives and with the information we are gaining from such sources as DNA and radar surveys its kind of amazing in ways we could not have even supposed 20 or 30 years ago.
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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Fri 28 Aug, 2020 5:42 am    Post subject: New Viking Sword found         Reply with quote

New viking sword found in a grave with other weapons in Norway. Very cool :-) Lets hope the surviving remains allow us some detail after conservation.

New Viking Sword found.
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Felix Kunze




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PostPosted: Sun 27 Sep, 2020 12:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

After two years of careful excavation in the laboratory, a new exciting armour find from the battlefield in Kalkriese has finally been published: A complete lorica segmentata of the Kalkriese type, making it the oldest segmentata to date.
http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/59648
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Michael Beeching





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PostPosted: Mon 28 Sep, 2020 12:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's a neat report, though I'm not sure I agree with the sentiment here:

Quote:

Iron plate armour was introduced by Augustus as an improvement on chain mail. It was relatively light (around 17 pounds) and because the plates were tied together with leather cords, they were much more flexible than chain mail.


...I think I've read or listened to a few debates, some of them here, where the mail vs. lorica segmentata issue was addressed. I imagine both had their advantages and disadvantages, but I wholly doubt that lorica segmentata was MORE flexible than mail. In some regards, the entire point of the plate is to not be all that flexible. Big Grin

It's a minor nitpick, but if your blog is focused on the history and use of historical items, being technically accurate is a good idea.
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James Arlen Gillaspie
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PostPosted: Tue 29 Sep, 2020 8:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

One thing I do not doubt is that the 'segmentata, laminata, whatever' was cheaper and faster to produce than a mail shirt. It has been suggested that the legionaries themselves did a lot of the work.
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Dan Howard




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PostPosted: Tue 29 Sep, 2020 3:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Beeching wrote:
That's a neat report, though I'm not sure I agree with the sentiment here:

Quote:

Iron plate armour was introduced by Augustus as an improvement on chain mail. It was relatively light (around 17 pounds) and because the plates were tied together with leather cords, they were much more flexible than chain mail.


...I think I've read or listened to a few debates, some of them here, where the mail vs. lorica segmentata issue was addressed. I imagine both had their advantages and disadvantages, but I wholly doubt that lorica segmentata was MORE flexible than mail. In some regards, the entire point of the plate is to not be all that flexible. Big Grin

It's a minor nitpick, but if your blog is focused on the history and use of historical items, being technically accurate is a good idea.

,
The whole point of segmentata was to develop metal armour that was cheaper and faster to produce than the alternatives. It was the Roman equivalent of munitions armour. There isn't a single depiction in any time period of an officer or NCO wearing it. Those with the means preferred mail or scale or musculata. When Diocletian reformed the military and took over the armour fabricae, he got rid of segmentata and focused on standardizing and streamlining the production of mail. Even though it was slower and more expensive to produce, it was considered the superior choice. It is pretty obvious when you think about it. Segmentata saw use for around three hundred years. Mail saw continuous use for around two thousand years in virtually every metal-using culture on the planet and was the preferred type of armour even when segmentata was in use.

This might be worth reading
http://myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=26369

Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen and Sword Books
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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Wed 30 Sep, 2020 2:45 pm    Post subject: Northern steppe grave find         Reply with quote

Interesting grave find with weapons. If the DNA pans out it would be interesting to know how the group is related. Also Axes, knives and a dagger.

Ancient Siberian grave holds 'warrior woman' and huge weapons stash

Craig
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Daniel Parry




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PostPosted: Sat 03 Oct, 2020 1:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Interesting find. I saw quite a good documentary recently about a Viking woman found with weaponry in her grave and discussion (which went a bit too far in conjecture in my opinion) as to whether there were 'warrior women' in Viking society.

I think it's always tricky as to whether high status women buried with weapons meant they used the weapons or whether it was a recognition of power and wealth: a widow of a king or a daughter of a ruler who was the only child who held governance power and was therefore buried with the objects associated with someone who held that power normally, who would have been a man hence the weapons.

I think, though someone may correct me, that female pharaohs or regents in ancient Egypt may have worn artificial ceremonial beards for official occasions as a symbol that they held a man's power.

There is certainly evidence that noble women in Japan were trained to a degree in martial arts for defence of the home and participated in siege defences.

I am sure it is possible. I remember my younger days when I played a lot of competitive snooker and pool and one of the teams we were always a bit nervous of in the league was the women's team from one of the clubs in the tougher end of London. You would not want to get into a fight with those ladies. We always won the match but you had to be careful not to offend !

Again it's interesting how new finds add to or alter the corpus of knowledge.
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Roger Hooper




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Oct, 2020 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sixth Century Anglo Saxon grave found with weapons - https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/oct/05/archaeologists-unearth-remains-believed-anglo-saxon-warrior?fbclid=IwAR1JHvKj4NvWYAyemJb3QPHMj-2iHbcyCebj9sgF8p0wu2ieEm7oYAA0ovg
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Daniel Parry




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Oct, 2020 11:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

https://digitaleditions.telegraph.co.uk/data/372/reader/reader.html?#!preferred/0/package/372/pub/372/page/54/article/88554

Looks like a nice sword. This is about a couple of miles from where I live. Where I am, the village of Cookham, was one of the main fords across the Thames going west before the bridge at Maidenhead was built in the middle ages. There has been stone age, Roman, Iron age and Saxon stuff found.

There is a Saxon burial mound apparently on the golf course next to our house about 150 yards from the bottom of the garden but I have not identified exactly where exactly. Apparently one of the oldest stone age axes found in Europe was found in Cookham, though don't know any more than that. Cookham certainly has some vintage, as the Bel and Dragon pub on the high street opened I think in 1417 and has been serving beer ever since in the same building. Interesting to think when I go in there that when it opened the victory at the Battle of Agincourt was recent news.

Bernard Cornwell made Cookham the location for his character Utred's manor by the river.
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