Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Viking kit help for a newbie Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Simon Whittle




Location: V.A.
Joined: 17 May 2011

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 4:57 am    Post subject: Viking kit help for a newbie         Reply with quote

Greetings, all. I am quite new to this hobby, and have finally decided to start building my first historically authentic kit. I am not entirely sure how to go about it, though, and am seeking advice. My desired kit would be that of a Viking-age Norseman who is not filthy rich, but goes raiding and can afford some mail and possibly a sword. My budget is limited seeing that I am still a student, but I am willing to wait and save for a while in order to get good quality stuff. I think I have a sense of where to find a nice sword (Albion, Arms and Armor), but am not sure where I could find mail and a helm that are not beyond my financial means, or from India (I already have some butted, galvanized, steel mail from India, but might want to upgrade). I am also not sure what exactly to wear in terms of a non-combat soft kit, and under armor padding etc., though I do have a sense of what it should look like. Do I have to make my garments myself, or is there a place that I could buy something from? If I must make them, where might I find patterns, materials and instruction on the proper technique? Also, how might I get a nice shield? I would love to be directed to some instructions on making one of these, as I would like to try my hand.

I have managed to find one thing, though. Shoes: http://www.vikingleathercrafts.com/viking-boots.html . So, my question is: are they as authentic as the site claims, or is there something better in a similar price-range? They certainly look fine to me, but it never hurts to ask the experts. Also, I have read almost every article here: http://www.hurstwic.org/history/text/history.htm and have found it to be very helpful, as well as a source of my inspiration.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
-- Simon

*Warning, poster has odd sense of humor*
View user's profile Send private message
Peter Anderson




Location: Holland, USA
Joined: 22 Mar 2013

Posts: 38

PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 6:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Being in a similar situation myself, I'm glad you brought this up. Looking forward to what others have to say.

Glad you found Hurstwic. It's a great site.
Be sure to check out Regia Anglorum as well. You should find this particularly useful. This might also be of use. I laid out my latest tunic about like that, on the cloth, although details differ.
In my opinion, if you know how to sew, it is a better option. Purchased tunics may not fit right, and can be much more expensive than they ought, especially if you can find your fabric at a decent price. Of course, the really good ordered tunics are often guaranteed correct materials, accurate patterns, and hand-built from your measurements; these tunics are also frequently very expensive.

Shield: the period construction involves butted planks. I can't help you there. However, the standard reenactment method is to start from a plywood circle of the proper diameter, cut the hand-hole in the center, face the shield with leather or canvas, rivet the shield boss over the hole on the face, and the grip to the back, then edge the shield with rawhide or leather using upholstery tacks or small nails.
I gather that the period construction would differ merely in that the circle would be formed with several planks, ends cut to form a curve together, and glued at the inside edges. The facing is at this point wholly necessary, and as a Viking you may also want 2 iron bands crossing the shield-back: perpendicular to the planks, and parallel with the grip. A second canvas backing may also be desired. Don't quote me on any of that, though; I used the plywood option.
Painting is best done over a layer of gesso. If you want to use period materials, I can't help you there, except that I know there are recipes for milk-paint.

http://www.re-enactmentevents.com/DarkAge/Norse/MakeSheild.php I used this guide.
http://norsearmsandarmour.blogspot.com/2011/1...hield.html This one looks fairly decent and refers to butted planks.

You will likely have to purchase a shield boss, but if you wish, you can try this: http://www.armourarchive.org/essays/madmatt_shield_boss/

This is a fair general resource: http://members.ozemail.com.au/~chrisandpeter/....html#Boss

Hope that helps!
View user's profile Send private message
Simon Whittle




Location: V.A.
Joined: 17 May 2011

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 8:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply, those links are really helpful! I'm going to get started on making a tunic from that Regia Anglorum tuturial as soon as possible.
*Warning, poster has odd sense of humor*
View user's profile Send private message
Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
Joined: 17 Sep 2003

Posts: 1,306

PostPosted: Thu 04 Apr, 2013 6:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I haven't updated my own little Midgard site in a while, but it might help:

http://www.larp.com/midgard/

If you do use plywood for your shield, I would beg you to cover the back as well as the front! Even folks who don't know history can spot modern plywood a mile away. And even a coat of paint won't hide it sufficiently--cover it with fabric or leather.

Oh, and don't use wood stains, they were only invented to make cheap modern furniture look like walnut or cherry.

This should keep you busy for a while:

http://forums.armourarchive.org/phpBB3/viewto...mp;t=89155

Have fun!

Matthew
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Tue 09 Apr, 2013 12:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Simon, I don't know your exact budget but I have some suggestions if you want to keep to a relatively low budget for at least fair quality.

I find this site is pretty good: http://www.reenactmentmarket.eu/
Check out the dark ages section of their webshop.

Tunic, pants, socks and hat
Check out http://www.reenactmentmarket.eu/, they have this dark ages section to the webshop.
Not all the stuff there is suitable for a viking norse re-enactor of course, but you could at least get a decent set of clothes I think most re-enactment groups would accept.
I'd suggest you get their Men's tunic, their Pasbyxor (pants) and perhaps a naalbinding mossa hat or perhaps cap 11 or 13 and some Ansle stitch mid-length socks.
The socks are amazing, I've recently ordered my second pair from there. The rest of the clothing I suggested seem pretty good at least if the group accepts machine sewn garb. I make all garb for myself and hand sew so I haven't bought any of the clothing.

Fancy garb
If you want fancy garb you could get their Kaftan, but beware it might not go well with a Norwegian or danish style group since this is typical Swedish Birka or Rus clothing. Ask the group you want to join first.
If you still want to get the Kaftan (it is rather nice looking) you get this choice of colours for the fabrics. Choose a nice blue, brown or green herringbone wool for outer fabric and blue linen for lining, or better yet ask for beige or natural colour linen if they have it. This is because linen was very hard to colour until modern industry found ways to do it and I only know of any historical sources mentioning blue, bleached white or natural colour linen clothing. Neutral natural colour linen can never be wrong for this.

What about knee length socks?
The knee-length socks they sell are really only for Byzantine garb or possibly with a stretch varangian guard or viking traders who've visited the city of Constantinople. Could be compatible with some groups but check first. A safe bet is the Asle socks and they're slightly taller than the typical 2-toggle viking shoe which is good.


Shoes
Vikingleathercrafts two-toggle York turn shoe is the current best buy for us vikings. The turn shoe variant is more authentic than the 2-toggle viking boot which has a nailed-on sole, though both look very similar when worn.
You already know about their webshop, but this shoe is what you should get, and about 1 full size larger than your normal shoe size if you want those socks to fit.
That shoe is frankly unbeatable for the price, looks authentic, has a good fit and lasts a long time.

For SCA or larp use the viking 2 toggle boot with Vibram rubber sole is great, antislip, thickened protective sole if you step on something sharp and best of all, it's invisible when worn. I bought mine after recommendations from other forumites here and I've never looked back. These are easily my favorite shoes.
Some re-enactment groups might frown on the rubber sole though so check first. You can rip the vibram off in an emegency without damage to the shoe though but the soles cost extra.
But anyway, the turnshoe variant I mention above and wihtout vibram sole addition could never be wrong, so in doubt go with that one.


What's left for the garb is leg wraps, a belt and well, weapos and stuff.
I'll dig up some links for leg wraps.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
View user's profile Send private message
Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Wed 10 Apr, 2013 10:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I had a look at Historic Enterprises line for Vikings.

How about these leg-wraps?
http://historicenterprises.com/winingas-pair-...ath=99_190
They also sell a package with winingas plus hooks, that should be good value for money.
http://historicenterprises.com/package-wining...ath=99_190

I'll be ordering some of their more expensive variant sometime this spring, but they cost a lot more.
http://historicenterprises.com/winingas-hand-...ath=99_190

Historic enterprises have some nice sets of complete garb also, with the winingas and hooks included all for $299.95, worth checking out:
http://historicenterprises.com/outfit-viking-...ath=99_190
With this set you'd just need shoes, belt, pouch and knife (the one in the photo isn't included).

Could be a great starter kit, since you get wool tunic, linen undertunic, pants, leg-wraps and hat.


For a belt and belt pouch, how about Jelling Dragon?

http://www.jelldragon.com/viking_belts.htm
The ones I recommend are the flashy ones at the bottom of the page

Belt purses. These should be acceptable in most groups.
http://www.jelldragon.com/pouches.htm

They sell some nice linen and wool clothing too. Not as flashy as some of the other sites I've recommended but they seem to be of a good cut and materials.
If you want to, you can always adorn their wool tunic with tablet woven bands along the neckline and cuffs yourself later.

I note that Jelling Dragon now sell the Gardariki socks and needlebound caps I already recommended above (see reenactmetnmarket.eu).


If you want more bling, check out these sites for buckles, clasps, trinket and other metal things:
http://www.quietpress.com
http://www.re-enactment.com/
http://www.viking-shield.com/ (they actually may have shields for you)

If you want a fancy scabbard to go with that Albion sword later, check out Tritonworks.
Otherwise the sites I just mentioned have scabbard fittings if you want to make your own scabbard.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge


Last edited by Johan Gemvik on Fri 12 Apr, 2013 5:44 am; edited 2 times in total
View user's profile Send private message
Simon Whittle




Location: V.A.
Joined: 17 May 2011

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed 10 Apr, 2013 12:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, what a response!

@ Matthew- Thanks, that Armour Archive thread is filled with good information.

@ Johan- Those are some wonderful webshops; exactly what I was looking for. I especially like historic enterprises. These shall keep me busy for some time.

Thank you all so very much for the replies, this is a wonderful store of information for me to work with. I should be able to work up a nice Viking kit in no time!

*Warning, poster has odd sense of humor*
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 2,256

PostPosted: Wed 10 Apr, 2013 2:06 pm    Post subject: Need a seax with that kit?         Reply with quote

Hey, Simon.........If you're in need of a seax, then go to Kult of Athena and check out the Kris Cutlery version that just came out ! In Japanese-style shira saya, no less! Talk about a sweet blade, and a sweet price.......Or just check it out here on the site in Historical Arms Talk........McM
View user's profile Send private message
Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Thu 11 Apr, 2013 2:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Need a seax with that kit?         Reply with quote

Mark Moore wrote:
Hey, Simon.........If you're in need of a seax, then go to Kult of Athena and check out the Kris Cutlery version that just came out ! In Japanese-style shira saya, no less! Talk about a sweet blade, and a sweet price.......Or just check it out here on the site in Historical Arms Talk........McM


I second that! What a sweet blade for a project.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
View user's profile Send private message
Tim Mathews




Location: St Paul MN
Joined: 02 Oct 2004

Posts: 164

PostPosted: Thu 11 Apr, 2013 3:42 pm    Post subject: Viking kit         Reply with quote

Hello all,
I am considering building a Viking "soft kit" and have been looking at the offerings from Revival clothing ... Tunic, trousers , leg wraps and turn shoes ... Seems reasonably priced ... Any feedback on quality and Historical accuracy ?
Thanks for any feedback or advice.
Tim Mathews

Tim Mathews
View user's profile Send private message
Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Fri 12 Apr, 2013 6:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Tim,
the Revival clothing viking stuff seems fine to me in general quality terms. Hard to say from just a photo though.
Obviosly they are not hand sewn at that price, but perhaps they don't have to be and neither are any of the other vendors clothing we've had in the thread so far.
I note little details that are off on the tunic though, the neckline seems more like the square Roman type than Anglo-saxon or Norse keyhole style. The rest of the cut seems fine though.

This next bit isn't just about that one vendor but worth noting for all of the ones mentioned in the thread. -Get the colours right when ordering.

Linen for viking clothing is a great material, It's really supposed to be under-garmets or liners though.
There are of course instances when you'd wear just an undertunic if the weather is very hot and you still had labour that needed to get done regardless, well you might not wear any tunic for some of that really.
Anyway, I think most can get away with wearing linen as a hot summer or physical labour kit. This is not really the problem, the colours are.
Most fabric found in viking graves we can't say today what colour they originally had. But we do know what can physically be done with dyeing of linen and other fabrics with historical methods and what can only be done with modern industrial methods.
Linen could only be natural, bleached white or dyed blue. Written historical sources for linen tunics from just before the viking age mention white and natural colour, from sources from ages after you get some few references to blue linen kirtles and dresses but it's very uncommon.
Wool could be just any colour you could think of, though blue, red, green, yellow and brown would probably be the most commonly used.

So if you get a kit with a wool colour linen tunic you're in fact trying to make it look like wool at a distance, and up close it'll be non-authentic. If you want wool that's cool for summer use you can get some very thin wools instead.

The Herringbone option.
Not all fabric remains found are really herringbone weave, but a lot of it is. And it's very eye catching. Herringbone weave was common for tunics and leg wraps (winingas). Even linen could be woven in that pattern. Since it's pretty and authentic, choose it when available.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge


Last edited by Johan Gemvik on Fri 12 Apr, 2013 6:47 am; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message
Tim Mathews




Location: St Paul MN
Joined: 02 Oct 2004

Posts: 164

PostPosted: Fri 12 Apr, 2013 6:45 am    Post subject: Revival Clothing         Reply with quote

Johan,
Thanks very much for your reply ... Heat is definitely a factor in my purchase deliberations...
Again thanks for your informative reply.
Best
Tim

Tim Mathews
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Viking kit help for a newbie
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum