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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 28 Mar, 2006 10:55 am    Post subject: German translation help?         Reply with quote

I recently purchased a set of German-language reference books covering some of the items in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna (see here for info). The title is Katalog der Leibrüstkammer (Führer durch das Kunsthistorische Museum ; Nr. 13). What does the word (or collection of words) "Leibrüstkammer" mean? The covers have it broken down as Leib rüst kammer, which according to Alta Vista, translates roughly as "Body Prepare Chamber." Question

Thanks for any help you can give.

By the way, there's some great stuff in there. Happy

Happy

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Wolfgang Armbruster





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PostPosted: Tue 28 Mar, 2006 11:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leib means body, but in this case it means something like "personal", which means that this "Kammer" belongs to the King/Emperor. For comparison, a Leibarzt is a personal physician.

"Rüst" as in "Rüstung" = Suit of armour or simply armour.

"Kammer" = chamber

So it could be translated as personal armoury or personal armour chamber.

Hope this helps Happy
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Robt Maser





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PostPosted: Tue 28 Mar, 2006 2:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wolfgang Armbruster wrote:
Leib means body, but in this case it means something like "personal", which means that this "Kammer" belongs to the King/Emperor. For comparison, a Leibarzt is a personal physician.

"Rüst" as in "Rüstung" = Suit of armour or simply armour.

"Kammer" = chamber

So it could be translated as personal armoury or personal armour chamber.

Hope this helps Happy


I would go with personal armour chamber. As for belonging to the king, then there would be the word koenig, King, Königs, King's or königlich, Royal.

Robt
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 28 Mar, 2006 7:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks, guys! That makes a lot of sense now. Almost all of the armour has a personal attribution to German royalty.

Would Livrustkammeren be a Swedish version of that term? That word is printed under the dust jacket of Lena Nordström's White Arms of the Royal Armoury (Stockholm 1984).

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Wolfgang Armbruster





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PostPosted: Wed 29 Mar, 2006 5:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

My Swedish-skills are quite limited, but I think you're right. The two words look very similar and since the two languages belong to the same language-family it should be safe to assume that they have the same meaning.
Maybe some of the Swedish people here could chime in and help with that Happy
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Martin Wallgren




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PostPosted: Wed 29 Mar, 2006 5:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
Thanks, guys! That makes a lot of sense now. Almost all of the armour has a personal attribution to German royalty.

Would Livrustkammeren be a Swedish version of that term? That word is printed under the dust jacket of Lena Nordström's White Arms of the Royal Armoury (Stockholm 1984).


Liv= Life or waist or body
rust= part of rustning
Livrust= old svedish for Armoury or possibly Royal Armoury
Kammare= Chamber, room, hall

So Livrustkammaren = The Royal Armoury. (the n in the end of kammaren is sigular specified form)

Martin

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