Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Temporary weapons of medieval times... Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
M Boyd




Location: Northern Midlands, Tasmania
Joined: 16 Aug 2013

Posts: 63

PostPosted: Tue 24 Sep, 2013 4:34 pm    Post subject: Temporary weapons of medieval times...         Reply with quote

SNOWBALLS!





View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Charles Neeley




Location: COLORADO
Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Likes: 16 pages

Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue 24 Sep, 2013 8:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like it, great collection of illustrations!
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 981

PostPosted: Tue 24 Sep, 2013 10:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For some reason, I'm now dying to know just what this one's about! Big Grin



Can anybody translate the text?

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
View user's profile Send private message
Foong Chen Hong




Location: Malaysia
Joined: 18 May 2013
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 150

PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 6:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Are they dueling xD

It look like they are actually dueling

Descanse En Paz
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 9:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

lol, neat.

if its a duel, i wonder how a smack on the ear is rated in the rule book.

or if anyone just said the heck with it and warped snow around a rock and pelted you a good one. WTF?! come on, i can't be the only one that came up with that idea?
View user's profile Send private message
Peter O Zwart




Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: 28 Nov 2010

Posts: 69

PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 6:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like the ladies using their dresses to hold their snowballs, they definitely have an advantage there.

Maybe the guy getting pelted by the lady is some kind of honour code; "I'll give you three free shots first!" Ok, I am getting tired....
View user's profile Send private message
Peter O Zwart




Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: 28 Nov 2010

Posts: 69

PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 6:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like the ladies using their dresses to hold their snowballs, they definitely have an advantage there.

Maybe the guy getting pelted by the lady is some kind of honour code; "I'll give you three free shots first!" Ok, I am getting tired....
View user's profile Send private message
Peter O Zwart




Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: 28 Nov 2010

Posts: 69

PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 6:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like the ladies using their dresses to hold their snowballs, they definitely have an advantage there.

Maybe the guy getting pelted by the lady is some kind of honour code; "I'll give you three free shots first!" Ok, I am getting tired....
View user's profile Send private message
Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 7:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Those are not snowballs.

They are Holy Hand Grenades of Antioch.
View user's profile Send private message
Mart Shearer




Location: Jackson, MS, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2012

Posts: 1,280

PostPosted: Wed 25 Sep, 2013 8:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mikko Kuusirati wrote:
For some reason, I'm now dying to know just what this one's about! Big Grin
http://visualiseur.bnf.fr/ConsulterElementNum...mp;Param=C
Can anybody translate the text?


It's from an Italian copy in Latin of ibn Butlân's Tacuinum Sanitatis, BNF NAL 1673 fo 96v, 1390-1400.
http://mandragore.bnf.fr/jsp/feuilleterNotice...p;idPere=5
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacuinum_Sanitatis
The rubricated Nec et glacies... Nature is roughly "Neither ice and nature", Melior exci would be "better source (of)". I can't decipher all the initials, and the black ink is a bit too faded. Typically it would advise enjoying the weather, whether sunny or cold for best health.

ferrum ferro acuitur et homo exacuit faciem amici sui
View user's profile Send private message
Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 981

PostPosted: Thu 26 Sep, 2013 12:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mart Shearer wrote:
Mikko Kuusirati wrote:
For some reason, I'm now dying to know just what this one's about! Big Grin
http://visualiseur.bnf.fr/ConsulterElementNum...mp;Param=C
Can anybody translate the text?


It's from an Italian copy in Latin of ibn Butlân's Tacuinum Sanitatis, BNF NAL 1673 fo 96v, 1390-1400.
http://mandragore.bnf.fr/jsp/feuilleterNotice...p;idPere=5
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacuinum_Sanitatis
The rubricated Nec et glacies... Nature is roughly "Neither ice and nature", Melior exci would be "better source (of)". I can't decipher all the initials, and the black ink is a bit too faded. Typically it would advise enjoying the weather, whether sunny or cold for best health.

A-hah! The Wikipedia article linked me to a facsimile of a different copy, with images, transcripts and translations! To wit:



Nix et glacies.
Complexio: frigida et humida in 3º. Electio: ex aqua dulce et bona. Iuuamentum: meliorat digestionem. Nocumentum: tussim commouet. Remotio nocumenti: bibendo antea modicum. Quid generat: desicationes iucturarem et paralisis. Conueniunt magis calidis iuuenibus estate meridianis regionibus.

Snow and ice.
Nature: cold and wet in the third degree. Optimum: from good, fresh water. Benefit: they improve the digestion. Harm: they cause coughs. Remedy for harm: drinking moderately beforehand. Effects: dehydrated joints and paralysis. Most advisable for hot [temperaments], youth, in summer and in southern regions.

(Obviously, the language is slightly different and the last two sentences are omitted from the originally posted copy.)

Aww, not one word of what caused the scene. Hmm. Perhaps the young man has been refusing to take his medication? She's forcefully treating him for anger management issues? This is for your own good, you ingrate, now stop dodging and take it like a man!

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
View user's profile Send private message
Iagoba Ferreira





Joined: 15 Sep 2008

Posts: 154

PostPosted: Thu 26 Sep, 2013 2:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have yet to see a medieval dated one. They may be an iconographical invention, we may be misidentifying the material (flour, clay...), or it has some symbolic meaning that we may not be able to understand. Confused

Razz
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Temporary weapons of medieval times...
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum