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Christopher B Lellis




Location: Houston, Texas
Joined: 01 Dec 2012

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Fri 09 Aug, 2013 9:40 pm    Post subject: Sword weights not exactly as advertised         Reply with quote

Do you ever weigh your swords and check the COB?

I bought a little kitchen scale which serves the purpose well enough and noticed that all the swords I have are off in the advertised weights.

I don't have a big problem with this really, I'm just a bit surprised because aren't these machined? 3 of mine are Albions and 1 is an Arms and Armor sword.

Advertised weight
Steward-1300 g
Crecy-1390 g
Vigil-1140 g
Arms and Armor Grunwald-2.4 lbs


Actual weight
Steward-1337g
Crecy-1362g
Vigil-1123 g
Arms and Armor Grunwald-2.5625 lbs
The COB on this one is 5.5 and was advertised as 4.25

2 are heavier, 2 are lighter.

I guess this is a common occurrence?
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

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Posts: 5,676

PostPosted: Fri 09 Aug, 2013 10:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Blades may be brought to rough shape on a CNC machine, hilt components may be investment cast, but there is still quite a bit of handwork involved in the finishing process. As such, variances can and do occur. Study genuine antiques if you want to see things that will drive you crazy in terms of proportion. Use the stats as a baseline, not as a hard and fast rule. Best not to be too anal retentive when it comes to these things. Big Grin

With your Crecy there's a difference of roughly .062 pound. If you can't abide that kind of variance you'd better go work for NASA. Wink

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Christopher B Lellis




Location: Houston, Texas
Joined: 01 Dec 2012

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Fri 09 Aug, 2013 11:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
Blades may be brought to rough shape on a CNC machine, hilt components may be investment cast, but there is still quite a bit of handwork involved in the finishing process. As such, variances can and do occur. Study genuine antiques if you want to see things that will drive you crazy in terms of proportion. Use the stats as a baseline, not as a hard and fast rule. Best not to be too anal retentive when it comes to these things. Big Grin

With your Crecy there's a difference of roughly .062 pound. If you can't abide that kind of variance you'd better go work for NASA. Wink


When I was a kid I did want to be an astronaut Big Grin Where did all the space hype go anyway? Nobody cares about that anymore.

2001 space odyssey never happened. Sad

anyway, it doesn't bother me, it's just something I noticed that perked me up.
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Christopher B Lellis




Location: Houston, Texas
Joined: 01 Dec 2012

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Fri 09 Aug, 2013 11:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I haven't actually handled a proper viking sword replica but the grunwalds stats compare to them.

It's got heavy blade presence, nothing to crazy, it's still feels good in the hand and feels like it could cleave a cow leg in half. If it had absolutely no edge this thing would easily just bash you to death through non plate armor.
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Vincent Le Chevalier




Location: Paris, France
Joined: 07 Dec 2005
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Posts: 843

PostPosted: Fri 09 Aug, 2013 11:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, the difference in weight is not that big. In order to get a better idea of how difficult this is, you can work out an estimate of the difference in thickness:

What you are seeing are differences of 30g, roughly. Let's compute the thickness of a plate of 30g of steel, 100cm long and 5cm wide (this is "sword size", roughly). Steel density is 7.8g/cm³. So the thickness of the plate would be 30 / 7.8 / (100*5), which is 0.008cm... It's actually amazing that they are accurate to that degree Happy

Now the variation of the point of balance, on the other hand, is quite big.

Regards,

--
Vincent
Ensis Sub Caelo
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Nat Lamb




Location: Melbourne, Australia
Joined: 15 Jan 2009
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Posts: 385

PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 2:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

seems like a good thing... your Steward is positively leet Wink
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Bartek Strojek




Location: Poland
Joined: 05 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 2:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, those Albion difference are negligible and to be expected all in all.

Grunwald differences are probably actually noticeable indeed though.
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Harri Kyllönen




Location: Finland
Joined: 12 Jun 2009

Posts: 42

PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 8:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

~20 grams difference is expected and acceptable since these are handmade objects and not machined to specs. That's less than 2% "wrong".

But I was a little disappointed by my Windlass Hungarian Saber that was around 80g too heavy compared to it's advertised specs. Thats a bit too much.
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 8:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
Blades may be brought to rough shape on a CNC machine, hilt components may be investment cast, but there is still quite a bit of handwork involved in the finishing process. As such, variances can and do occur. Study genuine antiques if you want to see things that will drive you crazy in terms of proportion. Use the stats as a baseline, not as a hard and fast rule. Best not to be too anal retentive when it comes to these things. Big Grin



maybe their advertised weights are a rough average of their product or estimation. working in production these days, i see a lot of fine math equations put together to make the same product exactly the same 8000 times a day. but, even with all the perpetration there is still variance that just cannot be controlled. so if you try to make something 1300 grams exactly every time, your still going to have a slight variance in weight in either direction from time to time. add in the human factor of the finishing process and i think its impossible to hit the mark every time.
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

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Posts: 5,676

PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 10:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Harri Kyllönen wrote:
~20 grams difference is expected and acceptable since these are handmade objects and not machined to specs. That's less than 2% "wrong".

But I was a little disappointed by my Windlass Hungarian Saber that was around 80g too heavy compared to it's advertised specs. Thats a bit too much.


At the Windlass price point even bigger variances should be expected.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,676

PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 10:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Daniel Wallace wrote:
maybe their advertised weights are a rough average of their product or estimation. working in production these days, i see a lot of fine math equations put together to make the same product exactly the same 8000 times a day. but, even with all the perpetration there is still variance that just cannot be controlled. so if you try to make something 1300 grams exactly every time, your still going to have a slight variance in weight in either direction from time to time. add in the human factor of the finishing process and i think its impossible to hit the mark every time.


Exactly.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Christopher B Lellis




Location: Houston, Texas
Joined: 01 Dec 2012

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Sat 10 Aug, 2013 1:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nat Lamb wrote:
seems like a good thing... your Steward is positively leet Wink


Yeah, haha Laughing Out Loud I actually took a cell phone photo of that and sent it to some people.
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