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Jeffrey Hildebrandt
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PostPosted: Wed 31 Jul, 2013 7:29 am    Post subject: Indian Pata         Reply with quote

I don't usually work on swords, but this project was an interesting cross-over. This is my reproduction of an 18th C Indian pata hilt, with repoussť, etching and an Indian silk liner. It has been fitted with a Windlass blade, in an ironic juxtaposition of the original, which was made in India and fitted with a European blade.

I have posted more photos of this and other recent projects on my Facebook page.









-Hildebrandt

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Christian Borglum




Location: California
Joined: 21 Feb 2010

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PostPosted: Wed 31 Jul, 2013 9:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, that's beautiful! Very cool. I don't think I've ever seen a high quality reproduction of a Pata before. Your detail work with the etching highlights creates a very striking piece. I also particularly like the decorative fringe treatment you've done on the exterior rivet washers where the grip is attached. Plus that patterned silk lining is pretty sweet! You can count me among the many myArmoury forumites who always look forward to seeing your work, Thanks for sharing.

Christian Borglum
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
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PostPosted: Wed 31 Jul, 2013 9:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

ive seen patas in books quite a few times, that looks pretty exquisite in all areas of detail
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Jeffrey Hildebrandt
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Wed 31 Jul, 2013 10:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Christian Borglum wrote:
I also particularly like the decorative fringe treatment you've done on the exterior rivet washers where the grip is attached.


Actually, the washers securing the grip on the original I referenced were a bit different on each side, whether intentionally or from subsequent repair. I thought it an interesting detail, so I replicated it. If you look closely, you can see that one is slightly smaller with coarser lobes, and the other is larger with a finely "toothed" edge.

Thank you both for your compliments.

-Hildebrandt

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Matthew G.M. Korenkiewicz




Location: Michigan, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 31 Jul, 2013 4:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Now this is what I'm talking ' bout ! B-)

Beautifully done. It would be great to see the item in hand / on arm, and
interesting to read what you learned about the pata, or how much you may
have modernized the project ...
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Ian Hutchison




Location: Louisiana / Nordrhein-Westholland
Joined: 27 Nov 2007

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PostPosted: Wed 31 Jul, 2013 5:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That screams cool. I'd love to see what it looks like being 'worn' (or is it held? Perhaps both.).
'We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.' - Adrian Carton de Wiart
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 8:42 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sensational! This is the first pata replica I have seen, and I doubt I will see its rival (unless you make another one!). Well done!

Jonathan
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Jeffrey Hildebrandt
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 9:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matthew G.M. Korenkiewicz wrote:
It would be great to see the item in hand / on arm, and
interesting to read what you learned about the pata, or how much you may
have modernized the project ...


Unfortunately, I never thought to take a photograh of the pata being worn. It would have been a such a great opportunity to show of my embroidered kurta pajama, too! ;-)

As for the construction of the pata, it was made using historical technique. I raised it from one piece of steel, with the exception of the small insert that stabilizes the lower flat of the blade. It is riveted on with flush rivets that are etched over and nearly invisible, as on the originals. All of the hardware, like the pivoting forearm "bangle" and the grip, etc. are hand forged. Sanding was sped up with electric machines, but that varies little enough from the water-powered wheels of the past. The repoussť and etching processes are also the same now as then. I suppose the greatest divergence from the practice of my historical forebears is in my use of personal safety equipment and Sharpie markers.

Thanks for your interest; I hope this answers your question.

-Hildebrandt

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Matthew G.M. Korenkiewicz




Location: Michigan, USA
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks, JH ...

One of the fascinating elements of the pata, and I think another Indian
sword called the firangi, is where the blade meets the gauntlet. The
blade being rivetted in place. One can't help wondering how " strong "
the arrangement is ...

In fact, after doing a little Wikipedia-ing, the pata was " considered a
highly effective weapon for infantryman against heavy cavalry " ... so
it would HAVE to be a pretty sturdy piece, yes ?

Care to share a thought on this, too, JH ?
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Jeffrey Hildebrandt
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 10:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am not a sword performance expert, so don't put too much stock in my observations... but I think that the junction would be adequate. There is at least as much steel connecting the blade to the user as there would be with a more conventional tang, and the structure of the tabs that rivet to the blade have the right anticlastic form to resist deformation, though a more extreme medial ridge would strengthen them further.

My concern would be in the ability of the wielder to control the blade adequately without the use of his wrist - but judging by the extreme slenderness of many originals, I think that taking the wrist out of the occasion may have been wise.

-Hildebrandt

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Robin Smith




PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 10:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

When I was a child, my grandparents house always fascinated me. My grandmother was quite the armchair historian and antiquities collector. She had several cool antique weapons. One thing that always caught my attention as a child was the Pata that she had...

...I haven't thought about one of these in years. Seeing this made me think of all the cool stuff she had. For that, I thank you Jeff! Great job, as it has the character and grace of an original.

A furore Normannorum libera nos, Domine
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W. Scott Brown





Joined: 20 Jun 2013

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PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 10:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I recently learned how acid etching on armor was done, and yours looks like a great example of the technique.

And, I think other great modern armorers also use a sharpie Happy


Scott
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Jussi Ekholm




Location: Tampere, Finland
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Aug, 2013 12:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just amazing, nothing else I can say.
Jussi Ekholm
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Scott Roush
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Location: Washburn, WI
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PostPosted: Tue 20 Aug, 2013 6:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is really wonderful Jeffrey. What a weapon that is. It's one of those things that is obviously historical... but would also fit just fine in a fantasy, Steampunk or Post-apocalyptic setting!
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