Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Names of scabbard parts and harness Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Fri 07 Jun, 2013 6:07 am    Post subject: Names of scabbard parts and harness         Reply with quote

What are the names of all of the parts of a scabbard and harness? For instance:


http://www.sword-manufacturers-guide.com/images/Kreigswert_lg.jpg
The harness above has a belt and 4 straps. Two of the straps are split with long tails that wrap around the scabbard; what are these straps called? The other 2 straps are hanging from the sword belt; what are these straps called?


http://www.therionarms.com/reenact/therionarms_c1246m.jpg
What are the names of each of the various straps and parts on the above harness?


http://www.albion-swords.com/images/swords/al...bard-2.jpg
Do the various split sections of the strap in the above harness have names?

I am sure that the craftsman of the Medieval period had names for all of these parts.

Is there a good detailed reference for this specific information?
View user's profile Send private message
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Fri 07 Jun, 2013 10:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't know the names of the various straps and whatnot, or even know if they are named, but this page shows names of other parts that some others might find useful:

http://www.myArmoury.com/feature_anatomy.html

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 4
Posts: 3,970

PostPosted: Fri 07 Jun, 2013 11:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Referring to the article, besides locket, I have heard that area of the scabbard also called the throat. Is that wrong?
View user's profile Send private message
Chad Arnow
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Cincinnati, OH
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 21 pages
Reading list: 231 books

Spotlight topics: 15
Posts: 9,138

PostPosted: Fri 07 Jun, 2013 11:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roger Hooper wrote:
Referring to the article, besides locket, I have heard that area of the scabbard also called the throat. Is that wrong?


All scabbards have throats. It's what you first stick the sword into. Not all have lockets, which are metal bits sometimes found at the throat. That's my take, at least.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Matthew Bunker




Location: Somerset UK
Joined: 02 Apr 2009

Posts: 483

PostPosted: Fri 07 Jun, 2013 12:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
Roger Hooper wrote:
Referring to the article, besides locket, I have heard that area of the scabbard also called the throat. Is that wrong?


All scabbards have throats. It's what you first stick the sword into. Not all have lockets, which are metal bits sometimes found at the throat. That's my take, at least.


In the study of scabbards of the early medieval (ie pre-1066) and earlier periods, the term usually used is 'mouth-band', in English at least.

"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
View user's profile Send private message
T.F. McCraken




Location: Ingleside, Illinois
Joined: 13 Apr 2006

Posts: 128

PostPosted: Sat 08 Jun, 2013 11:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

On the scabbard, you have...(and these are MY terms)

The scabbard body
At the throat you have either a locket, if it is terminated, or an integral rainguard. You can have a terminated throat without the locket.
At the tip of the scabbard, you would put a chape (or, chappe) to protect the tip.

A scabbard's belt, I call "The Suspension" and suspensions come in different styles. Knotted, frogged, strapped, buckled, etc. These transition between belt and scabbard.

Hope I've helped.

Murphy Cool

aka "Murphy"
See ya at Bristol Renaissance Faire!

The decisions we make, dictate the life we lead.

"I drank what?" -Socrates
www.celticfuryproduction.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kel Rekuta




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 10 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 612

PostPosted: Sat 08 Jun, 2013 4:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

None of the assemblages illustrated above are period so don't spent a lot of effort defining the details. They are lovely modern interpretations. Ewart Oakeshott did a chapter of one of his books on scabbards and suspension so its probably easiest to use his terminology. Most people interested in the topic are familiar with his works and can relate immediately to his terminology.

Between the related websites "Effigies and Brasses" and "Miniatures and Illuminations", a researcher should be able to find sufficient period usage illustrated. Definitions are a modern hangup.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Sun 09 Jun, 2013 6:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Agree with you on the first 2 Kel but the last Albion one? That not based on a variety of effigies, statues, ms illustrations etc?
View user's profile Send private message
Kel Rekuta




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 10 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 612

PostPosted: Sun 09 Jun, 2013 2:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah, the last one is well done. For some reason my tablet didn't load that one this morning. Service has been kinda wonky while I'm traveling. Gotta update the software or something.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Leo Todeschini
Industry Professional



Location: Oxford, UK
Joined: 12 Nov 2006

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,571

PostPosted: Sun 09 Jun, 2013 3:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Harry Mariankis wrote
Quote:
I am sure that the craftsman of the Medieval period had names for all of these parts.


I have a feeling that if you ever managed to find a document that discussed the making of them, it would say something highly unuseful like "and make the belt in the usual way". That killer phrase pops up in all manner of written descriptions from cooking to wheelmaking.

Scabbards did come in a variety of layouts and they came with variations and makers would have local words or indeed their own words and then there are language differences also.

As a modern example. In an old job I used to use a toughed acrylic adhesive made by 3M. It could be called 3M410 (or whatever it was), it could be called acrylic adhesive, semi structural adhesive, toughened acrylic; all would work and all are right. It was however called 'Death glue' because it stank so bad it had to kill you. All special effects and model makers in London call toughened acrylic adhesive, 'death glue'. I bet its not called that in Paris, Solignen, Toledo or NY.

I suspect there were multiple words used for all the parts and none standard across the board.

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
www.instagram.com/todsworkshop
www.facebook.com/TodTodeschini
www.youtube.com/user/todsstuff1
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Tue 11 Jun, 2013 1:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Kel Rekuta wrote:
Ewart Oakeshott did a chapter of one of his books on scabbards and suspension so its probably easiest to use his terminology.


I have many of his books on my shelves. Do you remember which book specifically?
View user's profile Send private message
Kel Rekuta




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 10 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 612

PostPosted: Tue 11 Jun, 2013 3:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sorry Harry, my library is in Toronto & I'm not this week. Wild guess would be The Sword in the Age of Chivalry. If no one pops up the answer, I'm back home next Tuesday.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Wed 12 Jun, 2013 8:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Kel Rekuta wrote:
The Sword in the Age of Chivalry.


Ah! The one Oakeshott book that I don't have!
View user's profile Send private message
Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,838

PostPosted: Thu 13 Jun, 2013 3:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Harry Marinakis wrote:
Kel Rekuta wrote:
The Sword in the Age of Chivalry.


Ah! The one Oakeshott book that I don't have!


If you have Archaeology, read through chapter 14 The Sword In Wear

He referred to most metal bits (aside from buckles or rings) as mounts

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Regarding the use of the term locket

Middle French loquet latch, from Middle Dutch loke; akin to Old English loc
First Known Use: 1679


Those fittings used in a frog or baldric with a stud or hook to secure in the carrier.

Cheers

GC
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Names of scabbard parts and harness
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum