Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Name for pikes planted in the ground? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Allen Johnson





Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Reading list: 29 books

Posts: 198

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 10:33 am    Post subject: Name for pikes planted in the ground?         Reply with quote

I'm helping a friend out with a fictional book and am trying to recall if there is a term for wooden stakes or pikes (no iron or steel tips, just sharpened wood) that have been embedded in the ground as a defensive barrier.
Thanks folks!
View user's profile Send private message
Gottfried P. Doerler




Location: Tyrol, Austria
Joined: 11 Oct 2009
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 228

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 10:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

well, the german term for this is "Spanischer Reiter", which means "spanish horseman"
wikipedia lead me to the "english" term "Cheval de frise"

Interestingly the etymology gives the explanation, that it was named so due to heavy use by frisians, who had themselves little cavalry, and imho the same is true for the spanish, famous for their infantry.

View user's profile Send private message
Tomas B




Location: Ireland, Wales, Canada...I'm transient
Joined: 02 Mar 2007
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 83

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 12:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archer's_stake
Archer's stake according to wikipedia but I'm trying to remember a different word.
If they are straight up and around a camp or settlement it would be a palisade.
Are you looking for a term for an infantry defense or settlement defense?
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 12:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

trees?

;-)

I think stakes is right, can't recall anything else.
View user's profile Send private message
Terry Thompson




Location: Suburbs of Wash D.C.
Joined: 17 Sep 2010

Posts: 136

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 12:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean De Wavrin (1398-1470+) wrote in his chronicles in reference of Agincourt. several mentions of the wooden English barriers, and I don't have his account in the original French. But the English translation always appears to be translated as "stakes". If you can find the original French text of De Wavrin, you would be able to determin the contemporary French word.

Also the battle of Nicopolis (1396) where combined European forces were routed by the Ottomans, similar "stake" barriers were used by the Ottomans, intended to disembowl oncharging cavalry horse.

-Terry
View user's profile Send private message
Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Likes: 50 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,126

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 4:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Cheveaux de frise, usually plural:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheval_de_frise

http://www.google.ca/search?q=chevaux+de+fris...mp;bih=995

Single sharpened stakes individually pounded into the ground would be less versatile as the Cheveaux de frise can be moved to different places when needed.

I would assume that in some cases they might also be secured in place so as to not be easily moved out of the way by an opposing force of infantry. But just on the ground they would be very useful against cavalry unless the horsemen got off their horses to move the obstacle out of the way ..... not recommended if the Cheveaux the frise are closely protected by spear/bill/pike armed infantry and/or missile troops.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
View user's profile Send private message
Theo Squires





Joined: 23 Jul 2012

Posts: 64

PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun, 2013 10:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Not really pikes stuck in the ground, but in the off chance that the previous more relevant answers aren't right, it could be just palisade. That's more of a wall of sharpened stakes, however. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palisade
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Allen Johnson





Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Reading list: 29 books

Posts: 198

PostPosted: Thu 06 Jun, 2013 10:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks everyone- I appreciate it!
View user's profile Send private message
Stephen Wheatley




Location: DORSET ENGLAND
Joined: 15 Nov 2008

Posts: 90

PostPosted: Fri 07 Jun, 2013 1:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

''Swedish feathers'' in the 17th century - about five feet long two inches thick incorporating a musket rest, ''Chevaux de Friese'' I thought were horizontal logs with old blades hammered into them like a giant rotivator - used to block breaches in walls. Brfore these just stakes.
Stephen Wheatley
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Name for pikes planted in the ground?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum