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Scott Roush
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Location: Washburn, WI
Joined: 27 Jan 2011

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 3:20 am    Post subject: Single Edge Viking Sword... Type C hilt         Reply with quote

Here is ‘Ancient Heirloom’ or ‘Forn’ which means ‘ancient’ in Old Norse. It is a single edge Viking sword forged in a traditional manner using multiple bars of iron and steel forge welded together for a composite blade. This blade billet was started by forging a 40 layer bar of modern steel.. 1095 and 1045. This makes a low contrast, linear pattern that runs parallel to the edge. I then forged two bars of 19th century wrought iron (from an old, demolished Wisconsin bridge) into long bars and then twisted them in opposing directions. The bars are lined up with the piled steel in the center and the two iron bars on either side and these are all forged into a solid piece of steel. After welding up the core and additional bar of 1095 and 1045 was made for the edge… which was then welded on.

The cross guard and pommel (Type C) were forged from wrought iron from an old Wisconsin bridge and were deeply etched in acid to show the character of their manufacture and to heighten the sense of time and antiquity. I did the silver wire inlays before the acid treatment so that bits and pieces would come loose and stand proud of the work.. again.. giving a sense of the vast passing of time. Type C hilts were known to be massive and blocky with very little in the way of ornamentation.

The over-all theme of this sword is that of an heirloom passed down from father to son over many generations. Swords were items of tremendous value in Norse culture and were important family legacies. These swords were given names as if they had a soul of their own. I also wanted to go with the theme of ‘local village smith’ rather than a blade imported from Germanic regions. Single edged swords were known to be made locally rather than imported and the local blades did not typically have complex pattern welding. More a ‘piled’ structure like what I’ve done with this blade. Low contrast, weak pattern, composite nature. Again.. the blade was deeply etched to show the passing of time.

The grip is oak with goatskin wrap and leather risers.

The blade is 30″ long and a total length of 36″. The weight is 2 pounds 8 oz and point of balance is 6″ from the guard. A true cutting blade.


“And the Ancient Heirloom Unferth permit thou….”

-from Beowulf













This is a non-commissioned blade and I'm hoping to have it at my table at Blade Show. You can see more info and pictures on the 'Available' section of my website: [URL="http://bigrockforge.com/category/available/"]http://bigrockforge.com/category/available/[/URL]

http://www.bigrockforge.com
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Scott Woodruff




PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 6:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, that turned out awesome! The piled structure, the aging, the overall form, even the grip, I love it all. The proportions are surprisingly graceful. I really like the punched? dot decoration on the pommel too. Oops, I think I am drooling on the keyboard Big Grin
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 8:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There needs to be more single edged viking swords made, they're under-represented and I like them a lot.
This is a good one scott.
As I own a shorter but quite heavy single eddged viking sword, I'm curious about the weight and balance point you got on this one? Mine is a bit tip heavy and kind of sluggish but a brutal cutter, more like a bill or axe.

By the way, "Forn" is still in use in Swedish today as part of words, like Fornnordisk = eng Ancient northern (meaning ancient scandianvian) or fornfynd = eng ancient archeological (dig-) find, but no longer as a separate word. Happy

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Scott Roush
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Location: Washburn, WI
Joined: 27 Jan 2011

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 9:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you very much guys...


Johan... This sword weighs around 1.14 kilograms and the balance point is 15 cm from the guard. It is as you say... a brutal cutter. :-) It feels powerful but slow. Woe to shield edges!

Thanks for the info on 'Forn'... it came up in the translators I use as a stand alone word. But my original intention was to combine with heirloom.. or relic.. but I can't find an Old Norse word for those. I've been considering callling it 'ancient sword' in Norse instead... but I like the simple word 'Forn' I guess. It makes me think of Middle Earth for some reason...

http://www.bigrockforge.com
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 9:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Scott Roush wrote:

Thanks for the info on 'Forn'... it came up in the translators I use as a stand alone word. But my original intention was to combine with heirloom.. or relic.. but I can't find an Old Norse word for those. I've been considering callling it 'ancient sword' in Norse instead... but I like the simple word 'Forn' I guess. It makes me think of Middle Earth for some reason...


Middle Earth languages are derived from Tolkiens academic research in ancient norse so hardly surprising.

I have no idea if "Forn" is a standalone verb in ancient Norse, it might very well be. My understaning of it is only a handful of words and no grammar or anything.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Bartek Strojek




Location: Poland
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 10:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Really beautiful work, congratulations.
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Matthew G.M. Korenkiewicz




Location: Michigan, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 11:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

At some point I would like to add a Viking blade back into my collection. Many years have
seen several wonderful Albion Viking blades in and out of my hands. As much as I liked and
easily would have kept each sword, my style of collecting is to keep a manageable number
of items; then move one or two to pay for custom pieces ( some of you know I'm a saber-
minded Pole ... )

But I truly have been giving your sword look after look because the rugged construction
... aesthetically and artistically ... appeal to my own sense of what a sword I would own,
or want made, would possess. Minimal frills, a serious business-end, uniqueness, and
individuality ... ( I scoped out your recent axe as well ! )

What's more, your photography does the sword proud. I think you're doing a tremendous
job properly " advertising and displaying " a custom-piece -- here as well as on your web
site -- that deserves every bit the treatment its getting -- as it appears it got while being
fashioned ( hopefully that makes sense ) ...

Now, if I only had the cha-ching. B-)
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Jóhann Malmquist




Location: Akureyri
Joined: 19 Oct 2011

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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr, 2013 11:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:

Quote:
Scott Roush wrote:

Thanks for the info on 'Forn'... it came up in the translators I use as a stand alone word. But my original intention was to combine with heirloom.. or relic.. but I can't find an Old Norse word for those. I've been considering callling it 'ancient sword' in Norse instead... but I like the simple word 'Forn' I guess. It makes me think of Middle Earth for some reason...



Middle Earth languages are derived from Tolkiens academic research in ancient norse so hardly surprising.

I have no idea if "Forn" is a standalone verb in ancient Norse, it might very well be. My understaning of it is only a handful of words and no grammar or anything.


Forn is I think a standalone verb in ancient Norse, it is a standalone verb in modern Icelandic, meaning the same as in ancient Norse.
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Jarno-T. Pälikkö
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Location: Helsinki, Finland
Joined: 18 May 2007

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PostPosted: Mon 08 Apr, 2013 3:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi,
I have to say that as a fan of C-type hilt, I like this one a lot.
Also, the single-edged blade suits the robust hilt perfecty.
Congrats on a very tasty looking sword!

JT
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Scott Roush
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Location: Washburn, WI
Joined: 27 Jan 2011

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PostPosted: Mon 08 Apr, 2013 1:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you Jarno... I'm glad to see that there are actually fans of the Type C! Doesn't seem like a lot have been made... and they aren't exactly ... delicate looking? :-)

Somebody else on another forum mentioned that they look 'dwarvish'.. and I agree. At least in a Tolkienish way.

I'm currently working on another Norse sword and it will have a MUCH different look. Bronze cast Type H with inlaid grybedir plaques (cast in silver pewter) and double edge composite pattern weld blade with piled caruburized wrought iron edge (shear steel).

http://www.bigrockforge.com
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
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PostPosted: Thu 11 Apr, 2013 3:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Scott, I just keep falling deeper in love with this this sword every time I check the thread.
I just re-read some of the books mentioning this sword type and I think you nailed it.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
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PostPosted: Thu 11 Apr, 2013 4:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Although I might prefer slightly less aggressive antiquing, the whole sword is visually incredibly striking! I love it, it looks both historical and mythological!
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