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J.D. Crawford




Location: Toronto
Joined: 25 Dec 2006

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PostPosted: Sat 31 Dec, 2011 4:07 pm    Post subject: Swords at Musée de l'Hôtel Sandelin         Reply with quote

If you like swords (and who doesn't), you're going to love these pictures:

Go to: http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...adres.aspx
Type "Epée" in the second field and click "Ajouter" next to it.
35 hits should show up at the bottom. Then click "Afficher Les Oeuvres" next to that.

34 sword thumbnails should show up from the Musée de l'Hôtel Sandelin in Saint-Omer
Click on "Voir la fiche de l'oeuvre" to get details on each one.

Quite a collection! There's something here for everyone, from late Viking Age to 19th century. For my taste, highlights are:

A magnificant XIIIb with odd G/R hybrid pommel: http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...vre=394758

A lovely Ingelri sword with B1 pommel, similar to Oakeshott's famous sword in Glasgow: http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...vre=394759

A double fuller XIV similar to XIV.3 in 'Records': http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...vre=394765

None of these pieces were familiar to me, except the XIIIB which was part of the recent Cluny exhibit.

Has anyone out there had the fortune to visit this museum in Saint-Omer?
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Tim Lison




Location: Chicago, Illinois
Joined: 05 Aug 2004
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Reading list: 6 books

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PostPosted: Sat 31 Dec, 2011 7:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Awesome! That B.1 is soooooo cool. I'm not sure I've sen a B.1 paired with such a thin type 1. Makes for a great match in my opinion! Could be an interesting reproduction for someone who likes that sort of sword... Wink
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J.D. Crawford




Location: Toronto
Joined: 25 Dec 2006

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,597

PostPosted: Sun 01 Jan, 2012 6:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tim Lison wrote:
Awesome! That B.1 is soooooo cool. I'm not sure I've sen a B.1 paired with such a thin type 1. Makes for a great match in my opinion! Could be an interesting reproduction for someone who likes that sort of sword... Wink


My thoughts as well. Happy

This one is also interesting: http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...vre=394617

The blade, wide cross, and short handle have a 12-13th century look but the pommel looks like a stubby 15th century scent-stopper. Hard to tell what the blade is from the photo - looks XII but from the 14th century date they give it and overall presentation it ought to be XVI.
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
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Posts: 2,229

PostPosted: Sun 01 Jan, 2012 11:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some really interesting swords there. This one looks like a XVI but has a very broad fuller: http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...vre=394768
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Josh S





Joined: 15 Oct 2011

Posts: 74

PostPosted: Sun 01 Jan, 2012 2:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

And just look at the pommel on this thing! Reminds me very much of the various type XIIIs, as well as the Castilion-inspired XVIII, that Michael Pikula made, which were the first time I'd seen such large disk pommels: http://moteur.musenor.com/application/moteur_...vre=394764
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Fabrice Cognot
Industry Professional



Location: Dijon
Joined: 29 Sep 2004

Posts: 354

PostPosted: Mon 02 Jan, 2012 6:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some of these swords, and others from this museum were displayed during the latest exhibition at the Cluny in Paris.

A lot of them have been cleaned/restored in the late XXth/early XXIst century, and I don't know to what extent. And as always, there are a few dubious details here and ther : the extra wide cross, for isntance, on one of the swords linked above seems a bit out of place to me.

Remember most of them were also 'found' or 'acrquired' in the XIXth century, and at that time people would seldom hesitate to mutilate/reassambnle/arrange things to their likings.

Still, I'm planning to spend some time in St Omer some day.

Cheers

Fab

PhD in medieval archeology.
HEMAC member
De Taille et d'Estoc director
Maker of high quality historical-inspired pieces.
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J.D. Crawford




Location: Toronto
Joined: 25 Dec 2006

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Posts: 1,597

PostPosted: Tue 03 Jan, 2012 5:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Fabrice Cognot wrote:
A lot of them have been cleaned/restored in the late XXth/early XXIst century, and I don't know to what extent. And as always, there are a few dubious details here and ther : the extra wide cross, for isntance, on one of the swords linked above seems a bit out of place to me.


I know what you mean. All of their older swords have a similar surface (although it may be lighting) which seems to suggest electrolytic cleaning, from what I know of it. And whenever one sees odd combinations of features it makes you wonder.

I'm not so bothered by the long cross on that one sword - that was a fashion on 13th century German swords of similar blade type (see http://independent.academia.edu/MarkoAleksic/..._of_Type_N - and my avatar!) but the pommel seems out of place on that sword with a slightly different surface. Or is it?

If you could drop by some time I would love to see more information on those swords. I never heard of this collection until accidentlly coming across the web sites above. They don't appear in the common English language reference books.
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Neil Melville




Location: Scotland
Joined: 27 Oct 2009

Posts: 183

PostPosted: Sun 08 Jan, 2012 5:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the link, JD, it's a really good collection despite the odd reservation. I too discovered it by chance when touring north France some years ago and can recommend a visit for anyone.
Neil

N Melville
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Fabrice Cognot
Industry Professional



Location: Dijon
Joined: 29 Sep 2004

Posts: 354

PostPosted: Sun 15 Jan, 2012 11:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J.D. Crawford wrote:
I'm not so bothered by the long cross on that one sword - that was a fashion on 13th century German swords of similar blade type (see http://independent.academia.edu/MarkoAleksic/..._of_Type_N - and my avatar!) but the pommel seems out of place on that sword with a slightly different surface. Or is it?


In fact, the pommel seems to be Ok with the blade : same pitting, same patina. And intesting details as well, not really visible onthe official photos. The cross is different, too different not to raise doubt : different 'color' (though I agree the term is inappropriate), it simply doesn't fit with the rest.

Cheers

Fab

PhD in medieval archeology.
HEMAC member
De Taille et d'Estoc director
Maker of high quality historical-inspired pieces.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


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