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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 7:13 am    Post subject: Peter Johnsson Messer Video         Reply with quote

Everybody should watch this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOeTeVn1HXc

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Eric W. Norenberg





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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 9:10 am    Post subject: Re: Peter Johnsson Messer Video         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
Everybody should watch this:


I second that!

Felt like getting a peek at Santa's workshop - he's got all those familiar tools but the result is magical! I hope we get to see that side ring get welded on in part II.
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 9:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I really enjoy seeing videos like this. I'd like to see the finished piece. It looks pretty great.
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Lloyd Winter




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 9:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That was great. i want one of those!
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Marik C.S.




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 11:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
I really enjoy seeing videos like this. I'd like to see the finished piece. It looks pretty great.

I feel like I saw the finished Messer somewhere, either that or it was one very similar to what we get to see of the completed blade in the video. Or it might have been the original which this one is based on as mentioned in the video description.

Well never mind that, I can't wait to see more of the process. Santa's Workshop fits the bill exactly. I like the sounds within the video, good steel just has a nice ring to it.

Europe - Where the History comes from. - Eddie Izzard
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Julien M




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 12:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well spotted Sean and thanks for sharing.

I'd never heard Peter speak Swedish before, feels awkward since Peter, like his fellow countrymen (a recent survey showed that the Swedish rank top in speaking English as a second language) , is perfectly fluent in English so I kind of forgot that it was his mother tongue.

It's great to see the amount of shaping that Peter does on the anvil. He reduces grinding and file work a lot...I guess in a sense that's the mark of a great smith. Whatever I did on the anvil was a rough metal sketch, only to grind and file a lot afterwards (waste of time and material).

Too bad the video skipped all the detail work (we go from a vaguely shaped guard ring to a superb incised guard in a second). Too bad as I could watch this for hours (if you like that sort of thing I highly recommend the birth of a sword video by Richard Kazda from Armart: http://www.ezop.wz.cz/birth.html, that documents the making of a viking sword from beginning to end, including scabbard work).

Since this is part one, I expect part two soon!
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J.D. Crawford




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 2:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks, its a treat to watch the great man at work with his own hands in his own shop. I liked the parts where he was eye-balling things to see if they were lined up right. Will have to show this to my Swedish-speaking mother. Happy

Seems like a lot went on before part 1. Maybe there's a part 0, like the floor 0s you guys have in Europe. Wink
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Julien M




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 2:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
Too bad the video skipped all the detail work (we go from a vaguely shaped guard ring to a superb incised guard in a second)


Actually I've watched it again and I'm not so sure now. I now wonder if the lines on the guard and ring guard are just sharpie/pen lines, and maybe the detail file work is to come. I wish that's the case.

What do you guys see?

EDIT: ok switching to 1080p and full screen did the trick...it is sharpie/pen marks Happy
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Jonah Marlow




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 3:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson is a king in the swordmaking field, his knowlege, and his eye for detail makes his swords, and the ones he designs for Albion the best on the market im my opinon. Big Grin
Jonah Marlow
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Neil Langley




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 3:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
EDIT: ok switching to 1080p and full screen did the trick...it is sharpie/pen marks Happy


Yes, this caught me out too until I paused the image for a better look - at that point you can clearly see the marker pen. I hope the detail work comes in part 2.

Not too long ago I was lucky enough to be able to play with a langes messer at the Royal Armouries and, although it was a very plain example compared to Peter's, handling it was quite exciting (spear point, false edge - very light and agile if just a touch shy in blade presence) - I am planning on having something similar made and this just makes me want it more!.

Neil.
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Taylor Ellis




PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2011 11:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Excellent video, thanks for sharing! Peter is hugely underexposed on the internet considering his unequaled skill at his craft.
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Marik C.S.




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PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 10:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Part II is online and can be found here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ouFGMzCqYk

I really like that spiral pattern on the guard.

Is that carved out part on the back of the guard - at about 2:20 in the video - just part of the design or is there some special purpose I am missing?

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Michal Plezia
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PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 11:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hmm I wonder how the ring is attached. Modern MIG/MAG welding?
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Gottfried P. Doerler




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PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 12:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

its astonishing, just how much attention he pays to every single detail.

Quote:
Hmm I wonder how the ring is attached. Modern MIG/MAG welding?

i was thinking the same. i wonder how durable it will be in the end.
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Johan Gemvik




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PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 6:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great video! I could watch Peter work all day. I love how all the hilt pieces just click in place like that with a perfect fit.

I've gotten some flak in the past for filing "forward and back" as if it's an unprofessional filing method that could dull the file. In reality a file is hardened so far beyond soft mild steel it couldn't by any reasonable measure have any effect on the sharpness to lightly touch it on the back draw. Instead it sets up for better control and soft rythm in the work and the file isn't slammed down on the surface with each forward start, which could potentially make it crack and lose teeth over a long time of use.

I do light back draw with very little pressure, I've seen plenty of historical locksmiths do it on youtube and now I see Peter does the same so they can just stuff it. Wink

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Tue 13 Dec, 2011 1:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello all,

And thank you for kind words.
Me standing at the vice filing away day long is about as exiting as it gets. I actually like filing. Together with forging it gives me the best control and feedback in search for the shape I have in mind.

For building developed hilts with rings, guards and arms, I generally use a oxy-acetylen welder. I can get a good depth of the melt and avoid pores. It is also possible to do heat cycles of the weld just after it is made. For hilts I normally use 1050 steel. It files well (I like that ;-) and also allows me to heat treat the parts if I want that. It gives a better surface and is less sensitive and "buttery" than mild steel. With proper heat cycles after forging this steel makes for good looking and tough hilt furniture.

Will a welded side ring be a point of weakness?
-Not if it is properly done :-)
Joking aside, welding is as strong as the material around it, or stronger, providing it was done properly. Bad welds are bad news. Low quality swords are plagued with bad welds and other let downs or compromises. I think that is why many are worried or suspicious of welding.
-I shall not continue on the topic of low quality swords, as I tend to get agitated and silly.

My focus is the design concept of the sword. Its form, aesthetic character and functional properties is important to me. I also strongly feel the sword has to convey something: it is an object of beauty that is charged with meaning. This is what I strive to capture when I work in the smithy

I will use the tools of a contemporary metal workshop if they provide me with the service I need. I prefer hand work and only make one of a kind pieces and let the work take the time it needs, but I do also make use of a power hammer, a belt grinder and other electrically powered tools when this is practical. As you can see in the video, my work is exclusively hands on (as in non-automated). It is focused on details and how they interact in the wholeness of things. I believe this is where the secret lies, if there is such a thing.

At the moment I a preparing for the international knife maker show in Helsinki, 6th and 7th of January 2012. The messer may be completed for this (-gods willing and lady Fortuna smiling at me), but I have put another sword on higher priority that is now underway (an early saber with pattern welded blade and furniture of silver and wrought iron).
Magnus will return to document more work in my smithy over time. We shall cover other steps in the making of swords (things like forging, forge welding, heat treating, grinding), and perhaps manage to document the messer as it is being completed.
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Herbert Schmidt




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PostPosted: Thu 15 Dec, 2011 1:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's really nice to see you at work, Peter! It adds to your wonderful creations and makes them somehow more personal.

Great work!

Herbert

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Bruno Giordan





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PostPosted: Thu 15 Dec, 2011 5:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:
Hello all,

And thank you for kind words.
Me standing at the vice filing away day long is about as exiting as it gets. I actually like filing. Together with forging it gives me the best control and feedback in search for the shape I have in mind.

For building developed hilts with rings, guards and arms, I generally use a oxy-acetylen welder. I can get a good depth of the melt and avoid pores. It is also possible to do heat cycles of the weld just after it is made. For hilts I normally use 1050 steel. It files well (I like that ;-) and also allows me to heat treat the parts if I want that. It gives a better surface and is less sensitive and "buttery" than mild steel. With proper heat cycles after forging this steel makes for good looking and tough hilt furniture.

Will a welded side ring be a point of weakness?
-Not if it is properly done :-)
Joking aside, welding is as strong as the material around it, or stronger, providing it was done properly. Bad welds are bad news. Low quality swords are plagued with bad welds and other let downs or compromises. I think that is why many are worried or suspicious of welding.
-I shall not continue on the topic of low quality swords, as I tend to get agitated and silly.

My focus is the design concept of the sword. Its form, aesthetic character and functional properties is important to me. I also strongly feel the sword has to convey something: it is an object of beauty that is charged with meaning. This is what I strive to capture when I work in the smithy

I will use the tools of a contemporary metal workshop if they provide me with the service I need. I prefer hand work and only make one of a kind pieces and let the work take the time it needs, but I do also make use of a power hammer, a belt grinder and other electrically powered tools when this is practical. As you can see in the video, my work is exclusively hands on (as in non-automated). It is focused on details and how they interact in the wholeness of things. I believe this is where the secret lies, if there is such a thing.

At the moment I a preparing for the international knife maker show in Helsinki, 6th and 7th of January 2012. The messer may be completed for this (-gods willing and lady Fortuna smiling at me), but I have put another sword on higher priority that is now underway (an early saber with pattern welded blade and furniture of silver and wrought iron).
Magnus will return to document more work in my smithy over time. We shall cover other steps in the making of swords (things like forging, forge welding, heat treating, grinding), and perhaps manage to document the messer as it is being completed.


What about forge welding your rings? Do you think that hammering would be impossible or not aesthetically pleasing in such case? Did you weld the ring without any hammering even when using the oxy welder?

Ciao
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Ted Kokx




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PostPosted: Thu 15 Dec, 2011 5:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

great to see a true master at work
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Thu 15 Dec, 2011 6:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bruno Giordan wrote:


What about forge welding your rings? Do you think that hammering would be impossible or not aesthetically pleasing in such case? Did you weld the ring without any hammering even when using the oxy welder?

Ciao


Ciao Bruno!

With my current set up, using a propane forge specifically built for heating blades for forge welding and forging, I cannot fit a complex hilt inside. The doors are too small (I think this forge is clearly visible in the beginning of the video clip).
I also would not prefer forge welding a hilt made from modern steel like 1050, when I can get better and more reliable results using my gas torch.

It is true that it is possible to make a gas welded construction look very much like, or even exactly like a forge welded assembly. At least in some cases. But hammering is not strictly necessary for this. If you want you can leave gaps or lines like those that are typical signs of forge welding. To my experience, most customers do not like this. -There is always this worry: "Is it strong enough?" Leaving gaps or signs of the joining of parts, makes many people nervous. If they also lack the experience of seeing original swords, they think this is sloppy work.
Forging does not add anything structurally to the welding. Heat cycling does improve things, however. That is why I am careful to re-heat the welded parts several times after welding to normalize the steel.


-Hi Herbert! :-)

-Thank you Ted!
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