Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Re-Profiling a Blade Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Ken Jay




Location: Portland Oregon
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 141

PostPosted: Sat 23 Jul, 2011 9:33 am    Post subject: Re-Profiling a Blade         Reply with quote

I have an Atrim XVIII blade needing some re-profiling. The point is a bit carp tongued. I would think the blade will need shorting about an inch and re-profiled to a less needle sharp point. Any recommendations as to who could take on re-doing the blade point?
View user's profile Send private message
Mike Capanelli




Location: Whitestone, NY
Joined: 04 Sep 2004
Likes: 4 pages
Reading list: 5 books

Posts: 702

PostPosted: Sat 23 Jul, 2011 10:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm in the same boat with a XIIa Albion blade. I may after all just go at it with a belt grinder. I've also been told to use files as a safer way of removing material without the risk of screwing up the heat treatment.
Winter is coming
View user's profile Send private message
Justin Lee Hunt




Location: North Baltimore OH
Joined: 28 Jun 2011

Posts: 38

PostPosted: Sat 23 Jul, 2011 11:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I know that windslass isn't the highest end blade out there, but I've had to modify quit a few to meet the requirements of my group. I've found that a good file gives you the best results. Grinders are ok, but the file gives you the most control and the least amount of burs and/or heat. It might take forever to shape a blade this way, but the end results are worth it.
I opperate a website for my reenactment troop it's www.orderoftherouseclan.org Be sure to check out our forums www.orderoftherouseclan.proboards.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 941

PostPosted: Sun 24 Jul, 2011 5:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Justin Lee Hunt wrote:
I know that windslass isn't the highest end blade out there, but I've had to modify quit a few to meet the requirements of my group. I've found that a good file gives you the best results. Grinders are ok, but the file gives you the most control and the least amount of burs and/or heat. It might take forever to shape a blade this way, but the end results are worth it.

It's also MUCH more forgiving - slipping up once with a power tool can ruin the blade, while the worst a file can do is scratch it. Happy

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
View user's profile Send private message
Ken Jay




Location: Portland Oregon
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 141

PostPosted: Mon 25 Jul, 2011 2:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I agree about the dangers of using a belt sander and am uncertain to my skill in taking files to the blade. I was hoping someone might suggest a smith able to do this. Big Grin
View user's profile Send private message
Richard Eskite




Location: Northern California
Joined: 27 Jun 2006

Posts: 37

PostPosted: Mon 25 Jul, 2011 2:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ken Jay wrote:
I agree about the dangers of using a belt sander and am uncertain to my skill in taking files to the blade. I was hoping someone might suggest a smith able to do this. Big Grin


I had a similar situation with an Atrim I purchased used on one of the forums. I just used my belt grinder to establish the profile, which wasn't that hard. The time consuming part was getting the taper and bevels blended just right to match the new geometry. I did that work mostly by hand with files and sanding blocks. It isn't perfect, but it's a whole lot better than it was. At the same time, I did a nice cord and leather grip and blued the furniture.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Paul Hansen




Location: The Netherlands
Joined: 17 Mar 2005
Likes: 5 pages

Posts: 683

PostPosted: Tue 26 Jul, 2011 2:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hmm, I would have imagined that one of the sword makers who visit this forum would have suggested something to you via PM... I'd guess that one of the stock-removal makers could help you with it...

If not, then maybe someone who usually polishes Japanese blades?

Btw, I know it may be a bit off-topic, but aren't Atrims have a hardness level that's a bit too high to use files on?
View user's profile Send private message
Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Tue 26 Jul, 2011 3:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you guys end up using power tools, since I've done stock removal like this for about a decade and a half by now, here's a few tricks to it that you'll probably find quite helpful.

First, to get the profile right, make a cardboard template, then use that to mark the tip profile on both sides of the blade the same using a medium thick permanent felt marker.

There are several easy ways to avoid burn (where you lessen or even remove the tempering from excessive friction heat).
One way is to dip the blade in a bucket of cold water every other turn with the machine.
Another is to wrap a soaked towel around it near the work area.
Another is to get cooling fluid for machining, rig up a drip on the work object continually while grinding. This could get very messy though and suits milling and drilling work far better.

The first of these is by far the easiest to set up.

To know when to cool you can hold the blade with an unglvoed hand while working, the hand furthest away from the grinder, the other needs a glove obviously. This'll let you know right away if it starts to get hot, dip as soon as it's getting uncomfortable to hold. On the other hand you're working without the protection of a glove, which is risky if you're using an angle grinder or coarse paper belt grinder. Or a sharp sword. Tape up the edges real good first if it is.

Don't forget, always use eye protection, breathing mask and a chaperone in a durable material when machine grinding. You really don't want that dust made out of half grinding belt sand and half metal particles to get into your lungs. You don't want it in your eyes either. Nor do you want the grinder to take out gouges of your gut.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
View user's profile Send private message
Eric W. Norenberg





Joined: 18 Jul 2008

Posts: 265

PostPosted: Tue 26 Jul, 2011 9:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ken Jay wrote:
... I was hoping someone might suggest a smith able to do this. Big Grin


Well, a very quick Google search, and I found no sword makers in your area that way. I'd say the next step might be to try any local knifemakers- if you can't find any of these guys try either a good local hobbyist woodworking or leatherworking shop, or maybe blacksmithing association? One of these resources might lead you to a knifemaker or swordmaker locally. Maybe your local SCA group (Huzzah!)?

If you are willing to wait, and spend some dough, maybe contact Tom at Tried and True Armory? Perhaps Gus himself would be up for the job.

Finally, maybe you could search the DIY threads here on mA, see if a fellow forumite might lend tools and talent.

Cheers, and best of luck.
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Re-Profiling a Blade
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum