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Luis Armando




Location: Mexico
Joined: 09 May 2010
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 37

PostPosted: Fri 21 Jan, 2011 6:38 pm    Post subject: A new seax         Reply with quote

Salve Knights this is my new creation, an Anglo-Saxon Seax, its actions are 6mm thick, 2.8cm wide and 31.5cm long

We record the name in runes Gunnlogi Anglo Saxon








good knigths this is my new weapon I hope you like
by the way I apologize if my English is bad
Any doubt I am at your service

"Dying is nothing when for the homeland dies" (Jose Maria Morelos)
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Ben Sweet




Location: 831
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 512

PostPosted: Fri 21 Jan, 2011 9:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that.
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Isaac H.




Location: Northern California
Joined: 06 Jun 2010
Likes: 32 pages
Reading list: 4 books

Posts: 143

PostPosted: Fri 21 Jan, 2011 10:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Totally radical!! We see so many makers post their near flawless masterpieces on this site,but here is a simple ,down to earth, AWESOME creation.It just has that "real" look about.So fresh. Cool Reminds me a lot of something from the Mad Dwarf Workshop.Great work,Luis.By the way,what type of steel did you use for the blade?
Wounds of flesh a surgeons skill may heal...

But wounded honor is only cured with steel.

We who are strong ought to bear with the failings of the weak and not to please ourselves.
Each of us should please his neighbor for his good ,to build him up.
Romans 15:1-2
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Ken Speed





Joined: 09 Oct 2006

Posts: 656

PostPosted: Sat 22 Jan, 2011 7:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have to agree with Isaac. There is a tendency to idealize the weapons of a given age. Its like classic muscle car buffs remembering nothing but GTO's and Olds 442's and forgetting there were a lot of Falcons and Ramblers on the road too.
I'm sure there were many seax especially which were less than perfect specimens of workmanship but lethal weapons nonetheless.

Luis you did a good job; thank you for sharing your work with us. What did you make the blade from and how did you incise the runes?
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Addison C. de Lisle




Location: South Carolina
Joined: 05 Nov 2005
Likes: 27 pages

Posts: 614

PostPosted: Sat 22 Jan, 2011 8:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I wish your finish was more clearly on the "rough craftsmanship" side of things rather than the "unfinished" side (there is a difference). It's clear that you're trying to make a representation of a more roughly made tool/weapon for the common man, but it feels more like an unfinished piece to me due to the angle grinder marks evident on the blade, in combination with the hammer marks you left in the blade. I think it would be a nicer piece if you had just left it rough from the forge instead. The same goes for the runes - they feel more carelessly applied than like rough workmanship. The leather cord really doesn't do it for me either. I hope you take this is constructive criticism, and it is just my opinion. Happy

On an unrelated note, my Falcon still runs quite well and hasn't let me down so far! Big Grin

www.addisondelisle.com
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Luis Armando




Location: Mexico
Joined: 09 May 2010
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 37

PostPosted: Sat 22 Jan, 2011 11:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I thank you for your critics, the truth is that we try the more rustic as possible, the runes the grave when the blade was the bright red, can not remember the type of steel, but setting up shop at a very good steel profiles here in Mexico, did not give a mirror shine bright mirror because I do not like at all, it is historic for me is not very good in a piece of these times.
Once again thank you for your comments and wish you a nice day

"Dying is nothing when for the homeland dies" (Jose Maria Morelos)
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Sat 22 Jan, 2011 3:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like it! Admittedly it's a Seax and I have a weakness for seaxes.
It's rough and ready for heavy duty use without you being squeamish of making it worn or dirty. In my book knives don't have to look beautiful to be good or even great knives.

And yes, I don't believe every blade had mirror shine finish, most of them most likely did not.


There are many who make pretty looking knives that aren't meant for any serious use or are even quite useless as knives, some that make good quality knives that are still attractive and can be utilitarian and some very few masters who get everything just right making a work of art that's also of superior utility quality. Mastering that skill takes decades, perhaps even a lifetime and I'm far from there myself. Nor do I think it's fair to judge work by comparing with master craftsmen only, there has to be a place for intermediates and novices here on the forum as well and for people to judge their work from that perspective. If so, this knife sure looks a lot better than most knifemaker's first attempts I've seen. Wink

In my book plain or even "ugly" looking knives also have their use and worth, far more than a useless pretty trinket for sure. Anyway, this looks to me to be a sturdy solid blade which is the foundation for a good knife. From there it's just a matter of the amount of historical research and elbow grease you put into the project deciding how perfect it gets. On that note, I'm sure there had to be knives just like this one in use historically, not everyone was a wealthy lord or even had use for aesthetics in a utility knife. This isn't bad at all though, I see this one as having still hidden potential waiting to emerge with just some minor touches.

About the runes on the blade, you could fill it out with silver, copper or brass inlay. If you don't have one you could get a V-tool to undercut the grooves and metal wire to carefully hammer into it. I'm currently training copper inlay on simple flat bars of steel, in preparation for doing it on blades myself.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge


Last edited by Johan Gemvik on Sat 22 Jan, 2011 4:05 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Sat 22 Jan, 2011 4:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Actually, the more I look at it, the better I think it looks. It's just got a little different look to it than most glossy viking knives out there being sold today, which isn't necessarily a bad thing at all. Some of those pretty knives I'd rough up to look more "real". Wink
"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Isaac H.




Location: Northern California
Joined: 06 Jun 2010
Likes: 32 pages
Reading list: 4 books

Posts: 143

PostPosted: Sat 22 Jan, 2011 4:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I couldn't agree more with you,Johan.I think begginers are intimidated by all the awe-inspiring professional work on this site,and don't share their work because they are afraid of it not being "good enough".Personally,I think Lius' seax is one of the neatest weapons I've seen posted on this site for a long time.
Wounds of flesh a surgeons skill may heal...

But wounded honor is only cured with steel.

We who are strong ought to bear with the failings of the weak and not to please ourselves.
Each of us should please his neighbor for his good ,to build him up.
Romans 15:1-2
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


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