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Keith Larman
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 4:03 pm    Post subject: Detail photo -- Howard Clark forge folded blade         Reply with quote

Just fwiw, a detail shot of a forge folded blade by Howard Clark fully polished. Definitely different than a nihonto, but it has its own unique look.


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Ron Luciano





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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 4:23 pm    Post subject: Howard Clark         Reply with quote

Truly amazing work!

Ron

I have not tarried in long journeys over the surface of the sea, nor have I feared the threats of enemies or wild beasts, O strong leader, Maurice, go well good friend; I discern through such sweetness, the beauties of the country life, a safe return and nobility. Lift high the wine vessel. Such things are worthy of remembrance.

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Robert Denbigh




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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 4:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just out of curiosity is this the Darryl Mier stock that Howard normally uses or the folded 1086 that he has done a few times?
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Keith Larman
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 4:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Robert Denbigh wrote:
Just out of curiosity is this the Darryl Mier stock that Howard normally uses or the folded 1086 that he has done a few times?


Daryl Meier

Keith Larman
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Robert Denbigh




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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 4:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful stuff! Good thing I don't have anything else to spend money on (who needs a savings anyway....).
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 4:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks awfully rough to me. I bet a nice 100 grit emery cloth would take all of those nasty squiggles and ripples out Eek!

All kidding aside, neat stuff, just neat as all get out.
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Keith Larman
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 5:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
Looks awfully rough to me. I bet a nice 100 grit emery cloth would take all of those nasty squiggles and ripples out Eek!

All kidding aside, neat stuff, just neat as all get out.


Yeah, that would work... Wink A nice angle grinder works well too...

Thanks, guys. I just polish 'em. Howard (and Daryl) makes 'em.

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 6:04 pm    Post subject: Re: Detail photo -- Howard Clark forge folded blade         Reply with quote

Keith Larman wrote:
Just fwiw, a detail shot of a forge folded blade by Howard Clark fully polished. Definitely different than a nihonto, but it has its own unique look.

As you mention, this is quite unique and perhaps defined by modern materials and techniques.. but I'm curious, with this particular example, is there any historic/ traditional terminology to define such patterns? Or must you combine multiple terms when attempting to describe it?

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Keith Larman
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2003 9:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Detail photo -- Howard Clark forge folded blade         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
Keith Larman wrote:
Just fwiw, a detail shot of a forge folded blade by Howard Clark fully polished. Definitely different than a nihonto, but it has its own unique look.

As you mention, this is quite unique and perhaps defined by modern materials and techniques.. but I'm curious, with this particular example, is there any historic/ traditional terminology to define such patterns? Or must you combine multiple terms when attempting to describe it?


Some stuff, sure. It has a *very* tight itame hada. And I would also venture to say that it has a notare-eque hamon with some hataraki and pronounced ashi. But many of the activities Howard gets in some blades really don't have equivalents in the nihonto world and I hesitate to use the same words. If the blade was made from tamahagane, the composition would obviously be dramatically different. And with lower carbon levels. Japanese smiths usually use a heat treating method with temps, etc. that would probably result in instant fractures of the very high carbon levels guys like Howard uses. But his control over it, his ability to get incredibly tiny grain, and his ability to get it drawn back fast enough to prevent that failure results in a stiffer, harder, and more resilient blade in many respect. The edge holding of his blades is astounding. If he was using lower carbon steel we'd be seeing things like larger crystal, a thicker and more consistent habuchi most likely, and a variety of other things. Also the methodology of folding the steel in the manner that it is done also affects the appearance of hada. Once you know what you're looking at there's no mistaking one for the other.

So. With all that said. Apples and oranges. Some terms apply quite handily to Howard's work. Many other aspects defy traditional categories. As a result some don't like the work. That's fine. But you can't argue the performance either.

I'm finishing up the blade i had posted pics of in an earlier thread where it was in kaisei stone I believe. I'm finishing the burnish tomorrow and if I have time I"m taking some photos. San mai blade. Much more traditional looking. Very Howard as well. But more a traditional appearance. The blade pictured in this thread was pushing towards hitatsura as well with hardening pushing up into the shinogi-ji and mune (back of the blade essentially). Really Howard pushed the limits of the steel on that blade. Something he likes to do being a control freak and all. In a good way of course. Wink

Saw your pm here and noticed on my caller id that you called earlier, Nathan. Sorry, but I had the phone on the machine as I'm behind and have been trying to catch up when I can. So I was in the workshop with the ringer off, Pink Floyd on full crank, working my fingers off.

Keith Larman
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