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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

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PostPosted: Fri 24 Dec, 2010 2:32 pm    Post subject: Show and Tell -- Burridge Type G         Reply with quote

I could subtitle this as "My Second Burridge". But I won't.

Anyway, my collection of bronze age swords of Mycenae/Egypt/"Holy Land"/etc continued this month with an early Christmas gift to myself, a Neil Burridge Type G. I'd been wanting a thrusting sword that could have seen action in the Aegean, as well as being similar to types used by the Sherden, Peleset/Philistines and other "Sea Peoples", and the type G works for that, as far as I am aware. I had been reticent about the G, as inititally I thought it was 1. odd looking (it's much more attractive in person) and 2. probably a little shorter than I wanted (but really, it's not that short, the blade itself is about 19 inches -- but I initially wanted one of those longer "rapier" type swords, like one of the "C" series). Pics posted here (and elsewhere) by other G owners convinced me otherwise. So I sent Neil my order and he sent the sword in fairly short order (STILL suprised that it took shorter to get to my neck of the woods from the UK than I've experienced with many US domestic vendors!).

There's probably not much I can add here that hasn't already been said, either about Neil or his type G. The G blew me away, easily exceeding my expectations. It is light, fast, and deadly. The grip may seem restrictively small, but that is how it was designed and meant to be used -- gripped and used properly, this is not a problem. In fact, I feel the grip helps index the sword for an upward thrust from waist-level, and aims it right at the upper abdomen or solar plexus of an opponent -- this feels absolutely natural to me, anyway -- where a thrust will have the most effect. That's my pet theory, based on nothing more than an observation of this sword. If I'm right, then those ancients really did know what they were doing... now, the neat thing is that this sword can also be "fingered", using the "horns", and you can do all sorts of other thrusts, distracting (and even disabling) cuts, and other kinds of neat deadly tricks.

The sword Neil sent is also rather unique in that he added a little extra -- a gold band or insert, between the last grip rivet and the pommel. This was a neat cosmetic idea which really sets the sword off, an attractive addendum to an already attractive sword.

Anyway, to sum it all up, I really like this sword. It's a great sword for sticking it to those pesky Trojans, or Cannanites, or other bronze-age-ites. This is my second Neil Burridge bronze sword, and it won't be my last. If you want a bronze sword -- well, there's no where else to go, really. Neil is the King (Pharaoh? Chieftain?) of the modern reproduction bronze sword.
(http://www.bronze-age-swords.com/)



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David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Dec, 2010 9:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is really attractive and congratulations for your good tastes and the great looking and functional bronze sword. Big Grin Cool
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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T Franks




Location: Chicagoland Suburbs, Illinois
Joined: 20 Jul 2010
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Dec, 2010 9:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful sword by Neil, and fantastic taste on your part! Cool
"I would rather be first in a small village in Gaul than second in command in Rome." - Julius Caesar
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Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
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PostPosted: Sat 25 Dec, 2010 1:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The type G and the khopesh are two beautiful swords. Which one do you think you might get next - one of the Naues?

I favor the European models, myself - Ewart Park, Limehouse, etc. - something about those leaf blades
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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 774

PostPosted: Sun 26 Dec, 2010 5:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roger Hooper wrote:
The type G and the khopesh are two beautiful swords. Which one do you think you might get next - one of the Naues?

I favor the European models, myself - Ewart Park, Limehouse, etc. - something about those leaf blades


Leaning towards a type B, but a Naue II is definitely on my list. I think every bronze sword collection should have at least one Naue II, they're like the AK47 of the Bronze Age.....

David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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R Ashby





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PostPosted: Mon 27 Dec, 2010 4:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

NOT with yours, but I'd love to see some destructive testing done with a bronze sword, just to see how they really stand up to use.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Location: Netherlands
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Dec, 2010 4:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

R Ashby wrote:
NOT with yours, but I'd love to see some destructive testing done with a bronze sword, just to see how they really stand up to use.
Already done, f.e.: http://forums.swordforum.com/showthread.php?t...ght=poplar
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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T Franks




Location: Chicagoland Suburbs, Illinois
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Dec, 2010 6:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think the Witham looks pretty slick Cool
"I would rather be first in a small village in Gaul than second in command in Rome." - Julius Caesar
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Paul Hansen




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Dec, 2010 10:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Really nice sword David! Congratulations!
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Dec, 2010 11:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I enjoy reading about these bronze weapons as I always learn something,

I am curious as to what kind of edge is historical for these type of weapons? How sharp can bronze get? How does the edge hold? Is a less keen edge preferred as to keep a longer lasting edge?

I know this question may be a bit too broad so sorry if I haven't given enough traction.
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Dec, 2010 11:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
How sharp can bronze get? How does the edge hold? Is a less keen edge preferred as to keep a longer lasting edge?



Well I have read about bronze razors so very sharp is possible but how sharp would be optimum for a bronze sword would probably be similar to an iron or steel sword in being at most paper cutting sharp or a little less ( On average and a generalization ) for an edge that will cut with a decent blow or draw cut but not so fine as to be too fragile.

A sharp edge can be on a very thin and fragile edge but one can get a very sharp edge on a more obtuse angled edge with a thicker section backing up the edge i.e. a 45 degree zero edge will be more robust than a 25% zero edge, both are very fine but one is more robust than the other.

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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Location: Netherlands
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PostPosted: Tue 28 Dec, 2010 12:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Edges on swords were generally hollow beveled edges a few mm wide, by hammering and further sharpening. This results in hardened edges that were potentially very sharp (though sharpnes does vary from sword to sword a lot, depending on the skill and patience of the maker). Right behind the bevel is a thicker blade section, which makes that cuts don't go deeper then a few mm into the blade at most, actually not that much different compared to hardened steel swords with flat bevels. These beveled edges are seen from the earliest copper daggers, up to the latest bronze age swords. But there are also examples of swords with flat bevels or convex bevels. Those are a lot easier to make with the limited tools available in the bronze age. Hammering the hollow bevels isn't that difficult, but how to sharpen them afterwards is something I haven't quite figured out yet (at least not how to do it efficiently).
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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