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John Lundemo
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Location: New Hampton, N.Y.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 11:24 am    Post subject: New heat treated blades in progress         Reply with quote

Hi Here are blades in progress ready to start mounting. With the katana blades, the one with deep sori is 1075 and the other is 1095 fine grain. They were made straight and curved during clay/water quench, then tempered.


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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 2:56 pm    Post subject: Re: New heat treated blades in progress         Reply with quote

John Lundemo wrote:
Hi Here are blades in progress ready to start mounting. With the katana blades, the one with deep sori is 1075 and the other is 1095 fine grain. They were made straight and curved during clay/water quench, then tempered.


They all look intriguing. I suspect many are fantasizing about the hilted results. I am curious if the Western European ones that appear; "leaf blade", and the migration era / possibly Roman spatha forms are of 1075 or 1095? And if so, do you oil quench? I have not tried a water quench on a knife yet.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Ken Speed





Joined: 09 Oct 2006

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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 3:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hmmmm........Is the third one from the top a type X?
Inquiring minds want to know!
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Chris Lampe




Location: United States
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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 3:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some intriguing looking blades there! Can you provide an approximate sense of scale for these swords? It's hard to tell without any size references, although I have some ideas based on one blade in particular. Big Grin
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John Lundemo
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Location: New Hampton, N.Y.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 7:03 pm    Post subject: Re: New heat treated blades in progress         Reply with quote

Jared Smith wrote:
John Lundemo wrote:
Hi Here are blades in progress ready to start mounting. With the katana blades, the one with deep sori is 1075 and the other is 1095 fine grain. They were made straight and curved during clay/water quench, then tempered.


They all look intriguing. I suspect many are fantasizing about the hilted results. I am curious if the Western European ones that appear; "leaf blade", and the migration era / possibly Roman spatha forms are of 1075 or 1095? And if so, do you oil quench? I have not tried a water quench on a knife yet.
Everything is 5160H except the two shobu katana. The deep sori one is 1075 and the shallower one is 1095FG
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John Lundemo
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Location: New Hampton, N.Y.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 7:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ken Speed wrote:
Hmmmm........Is the third one from the top a type X?
Inquiring minds want to know!
Yeah it is, good eye;)
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John Lundemo
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Location: New Hampton, N.Y.
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PostPosted: Fri 21 May, 2010 7:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chris Lampe wrote:
Some intriguing looking blades there! Can you provide an approximate sense of scale for these swords? It's hard to tell without any size references, although I have some ideas based on one blade in particular. Big Grin
The gid dark one in center is 46" total The spatha with no fuller is 38" total
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Tim Seaton




Location: San Jose calif
Joined: 30 Jul 2005

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PostPosted: Sat 22 May, 2010 7:15 am    Post subject: good morro         Reply with quote

Cool If the gods are smiling upon me this day. the third one from the top would be type X Cool
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D. Lindley




Location: California
Joined: 30 Jun 2010

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PostPosted: Sat 03 Jul, 2010 8:12 am    Post subject: Hi John, Lindley here.         Reply with quote

The wu-jian is spectacular and true to form. You were right about the hamon edges; it was how it was done back then and one could carve stove bolts with them. I wanted to see what it would do and I selected a small palm tree that had sprouted in my back yard. I cut all the fronds at their bases with one go. My neighbors think I'm insane. I did it at 4 in the morning. There is not a mark on the blade. The geometry of the blade is also a factor in making it cut so well. If I can figure out how to do it, I'll post some pics of it on this website. People should see this. I now call it.................."Burglar Cutter"
Thanks again. D.L.

By the way, I saw a town in Sweden called Lundemo when I was there; passed it on the road at high speed. Now I see the Viking connection.

D.Lindley
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Chris Lampe




Location: United States
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PostPosted: Sat 03 Jul, 2010 8:57 am    Post subject: Re: Hi John, Lindley here.         Reply with quote

D. Lindley wrote:
The wu-jian is spectacular and true to form. You were right about the hamon edges; it was how it was done back then and one could carve stove bolts with them. I wanted to see what it would do and I selected a small palm tree that had sprouted in my back yard. I cut all the fronds at their bases with one go. My neighbors think I'm insane. I did it at 4 in the morning. There is not a mark on the blade. The geometry of the blade is also a factor in making it cut so well. If I can figure out how to do it, I'll post some pics of it on this website. People should see this. I now call it.................."Burglar Cutter"
Thanks again. D.L.

By the way, I saw a town in Sweden called Lundemo when I was there; passed it on the road at high speed. Now I see the Viking connection.


Is this a new jian from John or one we've seen before? If you want to e-mail me the photos I'll post them up here for all to see.

clampe1518hp@cox.net
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D. Lindley




Location: California
Joined: 30 Jun 2010

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PostPosted: Sat 03 Jul, 2010 10:21 am    Post subject: Re: Hi John, Lindley here.         Reply with quote

Chris Lampe wrote:
D. Lindley wrote:
The wu-jian is spectacular and true to form. You were right about the hamon edges; it was how it was done back then and one could carve stove bolts with them. I wanted to see what it would do and I selected a small palm tree that had sprouted in my back yard. I cut all the fronds at their bases with one go. My neighbors think I'm insane. I did it at 4 in the morning. There is not a mark on the blade. The geometry of the blade is also a factor in making it cut so well. If I can figure out how to do it, I'll post some pics of it on this website. People should see this. I now call it.................."Burglar Cutter"
Thanks again. D.L.

By the way, I saw a town in Sweden called Lundemo when I was there; passed it on the road at high speed. Now I see the Viking connection.


Is this a new jian from John or one we've seen before? If you want to e-mail me the photos I'll post them up here for all to see.



This is a new jian that John made for me that does not appear on the website. It has a died green maple burl handle that looks like jade. I asked him to make me one and gave him freedom to make variations wherever he thought appropriate. It turned out to be a real functional work of art. I've noticed that in his work there is most always the Viking in there. Since the origin of the jian in China is from the northwest and the guards on the early Han Jians were nearly an exact Thor's Hammer it made it even more appropriate that he make a jian. Boy was I ever right on this one. I'm on the road right now but I'll be back in two weeks and I'll take some pics. Thanks. D.L.

D.Lindley
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Sean O Stevens




Location: Grovetown, GA
Joined: 22 Oct 2008

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PostPosted: Tue 06 Jul, 2010 8:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ken Speed wrote:
Hmmmm........Is the third one from the top a type X?
Inquiring minds want to know!



Tim Seaton wrote:
Cool If the gods are smiling upon me this day. the third one from the top would be type X Cool



Back off boys, that one is mine. Cool
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