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Zach Gordon




Location: Vermont. USA
Joined: 07 Oct 2008

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 9:10 am    Post subject: Pronunciation         Reply with quote

I was recently talking to a fellow medieval enthusiast and, well I knew what I was saying, I didn't sound very intelligent because I didn't know how to pronounce some of the words I was trying to say. The two main words I can't figure out are:
Gaddhjalt
Maciejowski

Thanks
Z
p.s. If there are any words that other forumites can't figure out post 'em here and it can be a resource for learning how to pronounce medieval words!!!
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Michael Curl




Location: Northern California, US
Joined: 06 Jan 2008

Posts: 486

PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 9:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I"m no expert on norse pronunciation, but I think it would be god-ha-yalt
E Pluribus Unum
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R D Moore




Location: Portland Oregon
Joined: 09 Jun 2007
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PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 10:00 am    Post subject: Re: Pronunciation         Reply with quote

Zach Gordon wrote:
I was recently talking to a fellow medieval enthusiast and, well I knew what I was saying, I didn't sound very intelligent because I didn't know how to pronounce some of the words I was trying to say. The two main words I can't figure out are:
Gaddhjalt
Maciejowski

Thanks
Z
p.s. If there are any words that other forumites can't figure out post 'em here and it can be a resource for learning how to pronounce medieval words!!!


Here's a link Chad gave us some time ago for kelp with access to exerpts from the Maciejowski Bible. It has several aids to pronunciation:
http://www.medievaltymes.com/courtyard/maciejowski_bible.htm

"No man is entitled to the blessings of freedom unless he be vigilant in its preservation" ...Gen. Douglas Macarthur
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Paul Newman




Location: California
Joined: 09 Aug 2009

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 12:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I pronounce it " ma-cee--yowski".
Paul
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Vaclav Homan




Location: Hradec, Czech
Joined: 22 Jan 2008

Posts: 90

PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 1:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Concerning Maciejowsky, tomorrow you will have more information from polish expert.
Bernard Maciejowski was owner famous bible. He was polish archbishop in Krakw.

There is only one art of fence yet many ways to reach it
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Mikael Ranelius




Location: Sweden
Joined: 06 Mar 2007

Posts: 252

PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 2:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gaddhjalt = "Gad-hyalt" in Old Norse and Icelandic (yes, the "H" is supposed to be pronounced) or "Gad-yalt" (without pronouncing the "H") in contemporary Swedish, Norwegian and Danish. The a-sound has no direct equivilent in English, but it is somewhat close to how Americans tend to pronounce the short "O" as in "God" (as someone mentioned above"
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Anders Backlund




Location: Sweden
Joined: 24 Oct 2007

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 2:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mikael Ranelius wrote:
Gaddhjalt = "Gad-hyalt" in Old Norse and Icelandic (yes, the "H" is supposed to be pronounced) or "Gad-yalt" (without pronouncing the "H") in contemporary Swedish, Norwegian and Danish. The a-sound has no direct equivilent in English, but it is somewhat close to how Americans tend to pronounce the short "O" as in "God" (as someone mentioned above"


I've always pronounced it "gad-jalt" with short a's as in "aha."

You know, "gadd" as in "stinger."

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Bartek Strojek




Location: Poland
Joined: 05 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 3:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If nothing changed since the time when bishop Maciejowski lived, it should be pronounced :

Ma - like "mu" in "muppet"

cie - that's tricky, I don't think that many languages besides polish soften "C" like that.
I think that "see" proposed in medievaltymes.com may be the best.

jo - like "yo" in "York"

w - as "v"
ski - like "ski" (winter sport)

I think I've got this OK.
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Mikael Ranelius




Location: Sweden
Joined: 06 Mar 2007

Posts: 252

PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 3:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Anders Backlund wrote:


I've always pronounced it "gad-jalt" with short a's as in "aha."

You know, "gadd" as in "stinger."


Yes that's an even better example, but I was refering to the Old Norse "A" (represented by the runic Ansuz). Sorry people if it came across as confusing

Old Norse pronounciation - "God-hyolt"
Contemporary Scandinavian pronounciation: "Gad-yalt"

Btw "hjalt" is of course related to the corresponding English word "hilt". Whereas the "J" was dropped in English, the H-sound was eventually lost in the Nordic languages, although the ancient spelling remained.
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Xan Stepp




Location: Ithaca, NY
Joined: 19 Dec 2008

Posts: 54

PostPosted: Sun 16 Aug, 2009 5:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have no idea about Maciejowski, but do have a pretty good grasp of Old Norse/Icelandic.

I personally would write gaddhjalt for pronunciation as:
GAHD-hyahlt
But as people have said there is no direct equivalent for the ON "a" sound in Modern English. It is like the "ah" in aha, but it is shorter (in both ON and Modern Icelandic). Also, the h is pronounced, but it is aspirated, almost like you hear in cheezy Mexican accents in movies. It also runs smoothly into the "j" (like the "y" in yes), so it does sound close to just saying a "y" sound.

Also the "dd" indicates that the sound is long in ON, and should be held for about twice as long as the "a." In Modern Icelandic the "dd" is more aspirated, almost like a "hd."

Deyr f, deyja frndur
deyr sjlfur i sama;
en orstr deyr aldregi
hveim er sr gan getur.
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