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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 7:50 am    Post subject: Fine English Baskethilt Sword, Ca. 1600         Reply with quote

Something special, courtesy the V&A museum.

Date
ca. 1600

Techniques
Silver, engraved and inlaid with gold

Artist/designer
Horn, Clemens, born 1580 - died 1630

Place
Solingen

Dimensions
Height 101 cm (blade and hilt)
Width 12.5 cm (maximum across hilt)
Depth 11.5 cm
Detail

Museum number
M.54-1947

Object Type
This basket-hilt of blackened iron encrusted with silver is of a form known in the early 17th century as an 'Irish' hilt. At that period 'Irish' also meant the Highland Scots, who were celebrated for using a basket-hilted broadsword of similar type. The guard, which protects the hilt, and the pommel, which acts as a counterweight to the blade, are heavily overlaid with silver flowers and foliage. This was a characteristically English type of decoration at this period. The blade is engraved and inlaid in gold with religious mottoes in Latin and the royal arms as used by James I. The design includes a crowned S and an orb and cross - devices used by the cutlers of Solingen.

Trade
The blade is also stamped with a cutler's mark - a unicorn's head. This mark was used by Clemens Horn (1580-1630), one of the most prominent Solingen cutlers. Solingen, in central Germany, had a very large export trade and supplied specially commissioned blades.

People
A number of similarly decorated blades have been recorded, including one in Windsor Castle dated 1617 and traditionally said to have belonged to James I.

Credit line
Bequeathed by Francis Mallett



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-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Thom R.




Location: Tucson
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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 8:37 am    Post subject: most excellent         Reply with quote

this is excellent thanks so much for sharing..... note that the shields are welded to the bars (rather than integral with the bars) and no ring under the pommel nor attachment to the pommel. classic early 17th c technique. and what a remarkable blade!
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William Goodwin




Location: Roanoke,Va
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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 9:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

a beauty indeed Sean....a shame these types of swords don't get more exposure.


cheers,

Bill

Roanoke Sword Guilde

roanokeswordguilde@live.com
"I was born for this" - Joan of Arc
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Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 12:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It seems to me that it might be possible to achieve a similar look by etching a hilt, bluing it, then polishing the un-etched areas. I wonder if anyone has tried something like that with a reproduction hilt.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 12:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
It seems to me that it might be possible to achieve a similar look by etching a hilt, bluing it, then polishing the un-etched areas. I wonder if anyone has tried something like that with a reproduction hilt.


This seems to be similar to what A&A has done for their Elizabethan rapier. It would seem that they cast the hilt, blue it, and polish down the high areas.

Thoughts?



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Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
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PostPosted: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 12:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Can't believe I forgot about what A&A has done in this area! Yes, that seems to be an extremely convincing way to achieve the look of the original. I'd love to see what they'd do with a basket!
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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E.B. Erickson
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Location: Thailand
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PostPosted: Thu 27 Nov, 2008 2:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for posting this, Sean! That's a sword in a very nice state of preservation. For those who'd like to see a similar sword, there's two of them illustrated in the Hayward article in the "Features" section of this website.

--ElJay
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