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Michael Mercier




Location: Durham, NC on my way to Iraq
Joined: 19 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: Fri 16 Jun, 2006 9:01 am    Post subject: Anyone familiar with sword-gur.com's blades?         Reply with quote

I was wondering if anyone was familiar with this site. Their weapons look beautiful, but looks on the internet can be deceiving. I really like this longsword and am considering getting it providing its suitable for steel combat.

Mike

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Bryce Felperin




Location: San Jose, CA
Joined: 16 Feb 2006

Posts: 552

PostPosted: Fri 16 Jun, 2006 10:30 am    Post subject: Re: Anyone familiar with sword-gur.com's blades?         Reply with quote

Michael Mercier wrote:
I was wondering if anyone was familiar with this site. Their weapons look beautiful, but looks on the internet can be deceiving. I really like this longsword and am considering getting it providing its suitable for steel combat.

Mike


The pictures look good, and the prices are about half what a Lutel would be, which is the best benchmark for good price Czech weapons. However the payment system doesn't include credit cards, so you would be buying a lot on faith.

On the other hand if this guy's stuff is as good as Lutel or Vladimir Czervenka products then it would definitely be worth it in my opinion. Then again, it all comes down to personal preference in the end. How much you want to spend on a sword from a relatively unknown craftsman is really a personal decision of faith when you get down to it.

Bryce Felperin
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Michal Plezia
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Location: Poland
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PostPosted: Fri 16 Jun, 2006 11:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I dont like the shape of the blade....especially the ending of fuller.Don't you think that most of the blades are the same and only grips and cross iare different?
www.elchon.com

Polish Guild of Knifemakers

The sword is a weapon for killing, the art of the sword is the art of killing. No matter what fancy words you use or what titles you put to
it that is the only truth.
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Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
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PostPosted: Fri 16 Jun, 2006 11:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michal Plezia wrote:
I dont like the shape of the blade....especially the ending of fuller.Don't you think that most of the blades are the same and only grips and cross iare different?

The "one-and-a-half" blades do all have what appears to be a lozenge cross-section with narrow fuller of, maybe, 2/3 blade length, nearly parallel edged profile and rounded tip. Oakeshott Type XIIIa?

Within their catalog "sword" grouping, there is some variation in the blade profiles and fullering. The catalog indicates different typologies, as well, e.g., Petersen Type C, Oakeshott Type XI. One of the single hand swords is identified as Type XVI, but still seems to have a lozenge cross section from the end of the fuller to the tip.

"...dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skilful, and deadly."
- Sir Toby Belch
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 16 Jun, 2006 1:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Web site being discussed: http://www.sword-gur.com
.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
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Thomas Laible




Location: Wuppertal, Germany
Joined: 30 Jan 2005

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PostPosted: Sun 18 Jun, 2006 12:53 pm    Post subject: Swords of Jan Motycka aka Red Gur ?         Reply with quote

Hello,

I just have seen the website of Jan Motycka aka Red Gur
http://www.sword-gur.com/

Is anybody familiar with his work?

Thomas
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Justin King
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Location: flagstaff,arizona
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PostPosted: Sun 18 Jun, 2006 2:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Everything looks very nicely done, I really like the rapier.
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Jaromír Kožiak





Joined: 18 Jun 2006

Posts: 15

PostPosted: Mon 19 Jun, 2006 12:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am quite familiar with Gur´s blades. I own the V005 viking sword and T001 two-handed sword. Both are made as replicas of original medival swords that were found relatively intact and I consider these to be quite close to the originals. I is great, that Gur actually listens to your comments and is willing to modify his manufacturing processes due to your specifications - I have hot an unfortunate experience that most of other sword makers is trying to simplify their work even for the cost of lesser quality.

Several comments on the Gur´s swords I own..

Blade is very precisely crafted - absolutely straight - the same goes about the fuller. In comparison with, other blades I own (Had, Lutel) is in my oppinion a little better - after three years of active fencing is still in very good condition.

The weapons are quite easy to handle, the viking I own weights 1.3 kgs.

I really like the design and composition of this swords - these looks very good, perfectly hold together, nothing is loose, nothing is shaking, not even after longer use.

Of course... nothing is indestructible... the blades have quite slim edge (1mm) and if fencing more fierce without knowing proper techniques it could be damaged.. But a thicker edge could be ordered... but I persomally prefer the thin one - it gives the weapon a more realistic look.
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Thomas Laible




Location: Wuppertal, Germany
Joined: 30 Jan 2005

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PostPosted: Wed 21 Jun, 2006 2:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello Jaromir,

can you tell us more abot the manufacturing process?

which steel?
forged or stock removal blades?
peened or screewed tang?
Balance and CoP at your models?

Thanks,
Thomas

student at www.alte-kampfkunst.de
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Risto Rautiainen




Location: Kontiolahti, Finland
Joined: 23 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: Wed 21 Jun, 2006 11:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

From the pages you can find that the hardness is about 50 - 52 HRc. Some more pics and info you can find here http://www.sword-gur.com/WEB/STR/clanky.htm. Looking quite good.
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Jaromír Kožiak





Joined: 18 Jun 2006

Posts: 15

PostPosted: Thu 22 Jun, 2006 12:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thomas Laible wrote:
Hello Jaromir,

can you tell us more abot the manufacturing process?

which steel?
forged or stock removal blades?
peened or screewed tang?
Balance and CoP at your models?

Thanks,
Thomas



The blade is made of 14/260 cold-rolled steel, which is quite common for historical fencing use. I don´t know, what material is used for crossguard and pommel. These parts are forged, the blade itself is made by stock removal. I personally do not prefer forged blades to these provided by the condition that these are of similar quality.

Tang - the viking is peened, two-handed sword screewd. Both versions are available, I guess.
Balance - viking - 15cm from the crossguard, two hander 11cm
CoP - viking - 57 cm from the cg, two hander 65 cm
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Thomas Laible




Location: Wuppertal, Germany
Joined: 30 Jan 2005

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PostPosted: Thu 22 Jun, 2006 5:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Risto Rautiainen wrote:
From the pages you can find that the hardness is about 50 - 52 HRc. Some more pics and info you can find here http://www.sword-gur.com/WEB/STR/clanky.htm. Looking quite good.


Risto or Jaromir,

could you tranlate this?
Unfortunately English is my only foreign language Wink

Thanks,
Thomas

student at www.alte-kampfkunst.de
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Michael Mercier




Location: Durham, NC on my way to Iraq
Joined: 19 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: Thu 22 Jun, 2006 6:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am putting some money aside to get his hand and a half. Someday when I place the order and get it I will, of course, give everyone a review of it.

Mike
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Jaromír Kožiak





Joined: 18 Jun 2006

Posts: 15

PostPosted: Thu 22 Jun, 2006 6:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thomas Laible wrote:
Risto Rautiainen wrote:
From the pages you can find that the hardness is about 50 - 52 HRc. Some more pics and info you can find here http://www.sword-gur.com/WEB/STR/clanky.htm. Looking quite good.


Risto or Jaromir,

could you tranlate this?
Unfortunately English is my only foreign language Wink

Thanks,
Thomas


These are four short articles on following topics:
Anatomie meče - Shows how the parts of a sword are called in Czech
Krevní žlábek - The fuller - It is there to improve the characteristics of the blade, not to drain blood, despite the older Czech terminology may suggest otherwise.
Jak se dívat na meč - What should you examine on the sword - several comments for unexperienced users on how they can quickly spot common faults of the manufacturer by looking on the blade and bending it. Instructive photos included.
Práce s kůží - Leatherworks - instructions how to make engraved bracers.

More interesting is this - http://www.sword-gur.com/WEB/STR/technolog.htm
You can find the basics of used technology there accompanied with some photograps of unfinished parts... I will try to translate it into english, it just might take me some time - it´s a longer text..
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Jaromír Kožiak





Joined: 18 Jun 2006

Posts: 15

PostPosted: Thu 22 Jun, 2006 6:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is the first half of my translation of the manufacturing technology section of Gur´s website...Enjoy..


Manufacturing technology

Used material:
High - strength steel 14 260

Hardening:
The blades are temper-hardened industrially to achieve better and more homogenous results than by manual hardening. They are hardened to 50 - 52 HRc - this allows to combine durability with flexibility.

Crossguards and Pommels:
I do not use shaped casting to make crossguards and pommels. With exception of round and conic-shaped pommels, which are turning-lathed, all other parts are hand forged and then rough grinded and polished.
Even the inlet for the tang is manually cut (we do not use milling cutter) into the crossguard and optimized to the shape of the tang.

Two photos showing crossguard after forging and finished crossguard follow...
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Sam N.




Location: Beijing, China
Joined: 03 Mar 2007

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Posts: 114

PostPosted: Tue 12 Jun, 2007 1:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am currently searching for a good sharp for test-cutting. Dose sword-gur offer sharpened swords, or just blunts for sparring?


 Attachment: 16.89 KB
Sword-gur 2.jpg
The Sword I am planning on getting: model J007

 Attachment: 41.76 KB
The sword my friend is planning on getting: model T001 [ Download ]
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Risto Rautiainen




Location: Kontiolahti, Finland
Joined: 23 Feb 2004
Reading list: 10 books

Posts: 176

PostPosted: Wed 13 Jun, 2007 12:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sam N. wrote:
Dose sword-gur offer sharpened swords, or just blunts for sparring?


I hear from Schola Gladiatoria's forum that you can get those swords sharpened for an extra 10 euros. But remember that it won't produce a sharp sword, just a sharpened blunt. If you know what I mean.
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