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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 9:28 am    Post subject: New Beowulf movie.........         Reply with quote

It looks like we have a new Beowulf movie in the works. It would be great to see a quality production on this story.

http://www.beowulf-movie.com/

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Gabriel Stevens




Location: St. Louis
Joined: 02 Oct 2003

Posts: 145

PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 10:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You know I've only read parts of Beowulf, and that was a long time ago, but seeing the production design on this movie has gotten me interested in both the film and the story...
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Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 10:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Made in Iceland by Icelanders. It might turn out very well.

There is a discussion forum on that website where you can ask the director and writer questions. Perhaps some of us should engage them in a discussion about the weapons and armor they are using.

Besides the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf, wouldn't it be a great idea to try and turn some ot the Icelandic sagas into movies? Post LOTR, the studios might be more interested. Their literary style has such a "modern" ring and feel to them, that they are very accessible to us. Maybe Njal's Saga....
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Thomas Jason




Location: New Joisey
Joined: 28 Jul 2004

Posts: 230

PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 10:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks great and from the storyboards it seems that they are making Grendel a sort of Neanderthal.
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Bill Grandy
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 11:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The costume designs look like they've got some real potential here... (crossing fingers)
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Joe Fults




Location: Midwest
Joined: 02 Sep 2003

Posts: 3,427

PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 12:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Was all excited until I looked at the story boards.

Poor grendle the victem driven to revenge by the terrible Vikings.

Turning into a monster later.

I grow weary of the need to find an explaination or excuse for everything bad that happens. Can't a monster just be a monster anymore for the sake of being a monster anymore?

"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
-Marcus Aurelius

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
-John F. Kennedy
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Alina Boyden





Joined: 19 Apr 2004

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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 1:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joe Fults wrote:
Was all excited until I looked at the story boards.

Poor grendle the victem driven to revenge by the terrible Vikings.

Turning into a monster later.

I grow weary of the need to find an explaination or excuse for everything bad that happens. Can't a monster just be a monster anymore for the sake of being a monster anymore?


If you've read Beowulf in the original old english then you will know that he is not in fact, clearly a monster in the text. He is referred to in a number of ways, but due to the many double meanings in Anglo-Saxon english, the words could be interpreted as anything from beast to "unwanted houseguest." Grendel's motives are extremely important in many key passages of the poem, and the amount of emotion in those passages is tangible. The poem is rich in double meanings and really makes the reader think. Calling Grendel a monster is a gross oversimplification of a complex Anglo-Saxon character.
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Geoff Wood




Location: UK
Joined: 31 Aug 2003

Posts: 634

PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 1:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Alina Boyden wrote:
Calling Grendel a monster is a gross oversimplification of a complex Anglo-Saxon character.


Doesn't do to mix your Latin with Anglo-Saxon
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Gary Grzybek




Location: Stillwater N.J.
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 4:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I only pray that the story stays somewhat on track. Worried

It would also be nice to see some authentic clothing and weapons.

Well, it looks like there might be hope for this one

Gary Grzybek
ARMA Northern N.J.
www.armastudy.org
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Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Location: Göteborg Sweden
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 6:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I find some helms so far Happy
http://www.stellanonline.com/varmouriesx.jpg

costume
http://www.stellanonline.com/icelandextrax.jpg
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Joe Fults




Location: Midwest
Joined: 02 Sep 2003

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PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 8:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Alina Boyden wrote:
Joe Fults wrote:
Was all excited until I looked at the story boards.

Poor grendle the victem driven to revenge by the terrible Vikings.

Turning into a monster later.

I grow weary of the need to find an explaination or excuse for everything bad that happens. Can't a monster just be a monster anymore for the sake of being a monster anymore?


If you've read Beowulf in the original old english then you will know that he is not in fact, clearly a monster in the text. He is referred to in a number of ways, but due to the many double meanings in Anglo-Saxon english, the words could be interpreted as anything from beast to "unwanted houseguest." Grendel's motives are extremely important in many key passages of the poem, and the amount of emotion in those passages is tangible. The poem is rich in double meanings and really makes the reader think. Calling Grendel a monster is a gross oversimplification of a complex Anglo-Saxon character.


Old English...nope...not sure I ever have read Old English. At least not effectively. Frankly last time I read the poem I mainly notices what a pain in the rump it was to read.

Double meanings do not mean he is something other than a monster any more than they mean he is a monster.

This, like any interpretation, is a function of the time in which is is interpreted instead of the time in which it was created. If you take the time to look at the story boards and believe its true to the poem, then you will likely enjoy the movie. They are not true to the story I remember, which admittedly may or may not be true to the original poem. Thus I did not like what I saw.

"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
-Marcus Aurelius

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
-John F. Kennedy
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Joel Chesser




Location: Oklahoma
Joined: 23 Oct 2003

Posts: 714

PostPosted: Fri 24 Sep, 2004 8:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hurray! I can't wait, this is one of my favorite stories. I have been waiting for another vikingish film to be made, though I guess Beowulf is anglosaxon isn't it? Oh well close enough for me! When does it come out?
..." The person who dosen't have a sword should sell his coat and buy one."

- Luke 22:36
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Alina Boyden





Joined: 19 Apr 2004

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PostPosted: Sat 25 Sep, 2004 12:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joe Fults wrote:


Old English...nope...not sure I ever have read Old English. At least not effectively. Frankly last time I read the poem I mainly notices what a pain in the rump it was to read.

Double meanings do not mean he is something other than a monster any more than they mean he is a monster.

This, like any interpretation, is a function of the time in which is is interpreted instead of the time in which it was created. If you take the time to look at the story boards and believe its true to the poem, then you will likely enjoy the movie. They are not true to the story I remember, which admittedly may or may not be true to the original poem. Thus I did not like what I saw.


While it is true that interpretations are a function of the times, the poem left the question of whether Grendel was or was not a monster open ended. To think that this was merely a function of carelessness on the part of the author(s) is imho underestimating him(them). The fact that Grendel displayed super-human qualities did not make him less human. Beowulf was super-human as well and nobody considers him to be a monster in reading the story. Though I agree there was certainly something monstrous about the character Grendel.
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Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Location: Göteborg Sweden
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PostPosted: Sat 25 Sep, 2004 6:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

most of the stuff comes from Valentine Armouries of Calgary
http://www.varmouries.com/media/beowulf.html

If you want to look at some swords in movie action so do this,
and remember dont take any pictures there
and putt up somewhere, ok

click on Geatland link and use

USERNAME: Tonyfan
PASSWORD: Hondschioh
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Joe Fults




Location: Midwest
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PostPosted: Sun 26 Sep, 2004 12:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It is not the quality that in my opinion begs the question.

It is the application.

Regardless of motivation.

"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
-Marcus Aurelius

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
-John F. Kennedy
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David McElrea




Location: Canada
Joined: 26 Nov 2003

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PostPosted: Sun 26 Sep, 2004 4:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Like others here, it has been a long time since I last read Beowulf (fifteen years or so, anyway). With regards to Grendel's identity as "monster", I would agree with Alina that I recall a certain amount of pathos surrounding Grendel, particularly as touching on his mother's grief. Yet, ironically, the monstrosity of Grendel is seen most clearly in his mother, I think-- which is to say, while there may be more than one level to the character, he is still clearly a "monster", no? Physically he is described so, he dwells under the waters of a lake (or sea?), he is described as being descended from Cain and twisted by the devil, and so on. In like manner, his mother is twisted, although we can almost feel sympathy for her-- her situation is almost similar to the devil in Milton-- an abomination whom, because of the author's approach alone, could almost elicit some sympathy.

Just some thoughts Happy

David
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Perry L. Goss




Location: Missouri
Joined: 15 May 2004
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PostPosted: Mon 27 Sep, 2004 6:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ya, I like de ponies! Fjords, ya!

Can't wait to see Heorot Hall either! Now that would be almost as good as the weapons/action! Mighty oaken timbers framed, tenoned and pegged, mighty spans of well seasoned wood bound in iron! Stoke the fires under the honey and the beer kettles wench!

"Drag out the meade benches"! "Beowulf" by Magnus Manusson circa 1987. It is required reading in our house at least once a year on a dark, cold, somber winter's eve!!! Best by firelight, ya!


Might inspire me for the latest timber framing project down on the Jack's Fork river!!!! Throw in a few copperheads by torch light and...........



Wonder how much longer after Pitt's new movie this will be?

My boys have 13th warrior memorized!

Scottish: Ballentine, Black, Cameron, Chisholm, Cunningham, Crawford, Grant, Jaffray, MacFarlane, MacGillivray, MacKay-Reay/Strathnaver, Munro, Robertson, Sinclair, Wallace

Irish/Welsh: Bodkin, Mendenhall, Hackworth

Swiss: Goss von Rothenfluh, Naff von Zurich und Solland von Appenzel
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Jeanry Chandler




Location: New Orleans, Louisiana
Joined: 07 Feb 2004

Posts: 62

PostPosted: Mon 27 Sep, 2004 9:11 pm    Post subject: Who grendel was         Reply with quote

Alina Boyden wrote:
[
If you've read Beowulf in the original old english then you will know that he is not in fact, clearly a monster in the text. He is referred to in a number of ways, but due to the many double meanings in Anglo-Saxon english, the words could be interpreted as anything from beast to "unwanted houseguest." Grendel's motives are extremely important in many key passages of the poem, and the amount of emotion in those passages is tangible. The poem is rich in double meanings and really makes the reader think. Calling Grendel a monster is a gross oversimplification of a complex Anglo-Saxon character.


I read an interesting theory on vikinganswerlady.com that grendel could have been an exiled berzerker...


JR

"A strong people do not ned a strong leader."

Emiliano Zapata
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Michael L Smith




Location: Mt. Pocono, PA
Joined: 24 Aug 2003

Posts: 40

PostPosted: Wed 29 Sep, 2004 7:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

(If you've read Beowulf in the original old english then you will know that he is not in fact, clearly a monster in the text.)

Contrary to this statement, it is quite obvious from the poem that Grendel is a monster. True, no one word in the text identifies Grendel as something translateable as "monster," but his physical description leaves no doubt as to his true nature. It takes four warriors to carry his head, he is incapable of being injured by man-made weapons, he has claws instead of hands, and he is descended from Cain as are giants, ogres, orcs, and other "gentle" souls.

Then there is his pyschological make-up. He eats people, he pays no wergild, attacks his victims while they're sleeping, and, most disturbing of all, he is a fatherless creature ie cannot be identified as somebody's son. To the Anglo-Saxon mind, this makes Grendel monstrous indeed.

In translating the Old English text, words cannot be taken out of context. Grendel is clearly a "bold demon out of darkness," "a cruel spirit," and not merely somebody's "unwanted houseguest" although this last phrase is an example of classic Anglo-Saxon use of ironic understatement describing someone who has broken into your house, killed your retainers, and wrecked all your furniture.

Regards
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Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Location: Göteborg Sweden
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 411

PostPosted: Mon 18 Oct, 2004 4:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice sword!
i belive that one is a JT-sword
http://beowulfandgrendel.com/v-web/gallery/Th...t/BWSWORD1

JT link
http://www.kp-art.fi/jt/miekat/04.html
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