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Craig Peters




PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2019 7:02 am    Post subject: Albion is Offering War Axes...         Reply with quote

The title says it all. The first axe on offer is a small bearded axe from the 8th-11th century AD. These axes with be produced in small, limited runs.

See here: https://www.albion-swords.com/axes/SmallBeardedVikingAxe.htm
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Joe Maccarrone




Location: Burien, WA USA
Joined: 19 Sep 2003

Posts: 187

PostPosted: Tue 15 Jan, 2019 5:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A series of affordable limited-run axes by Eric? I am so in for these... Big Grin
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James Rogers





Joined: 31 May 2010

Posts: 23

PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 4:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm skeptical of it being cast. Very interesting project, though. I'll watch this space for reviews.
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Ryan Hobbs




Location: Middle GA
Joined: 19 Jun 2016
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PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 8:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Deleted because I was silly and didn't read the entire description on Albion's website. It's not a mono-steel ax everyone, I repeat, NOT MONO-STEAL
No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.
Hebrews 12:11


Last edited by Ryan Hobbs on Sat 19 Jan, 2019 7:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Arne G.





Joined: 31 Jul 2014

Posts: 115

PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 8:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ryan Hobbs wrote:
Hmmmm, seems a little steep for a monosteel axe. Other fine axe makers offer forge welded axes for similar prices or for a little more, when typically a monosteel axe should be cheaper.
Granted, you can cut the cost down to $350 if you don't get a handle but still, that's a lot of money for a relatively simple and small axe head.
I'm sure it's fine quality, I own several Albion swords and have another on the way, but at the end of the day it's still an axe.


It is not monosteel:
"To get the correct shape of the historical original, and keep costs down, the body of the axe is cast in mild steel and the high-carbon edge forge-welded to the body by Eric. "
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Victor R.




Location: Klein, Texas
Joined: 28 Jan 2008
Reading list: 4 books

Posts: 299

PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 9:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Arne G. wrote:
Ryan Hobbs wrote:
Hmmmm, seems a little steep for a monosteel axe. Other fine axe makers offer forge welded axes for similar prices or for a little more, when typically a monosteel axe should be cheaper.
Granted, you can cut the cost down to $350 if you don't get a handle but still, that's a lot of money for a relatively simple and small axe head.
I'm sure it's fine quality, I own several Albion swords and have another on the way, but at the end of the day it's still an axe.


It is not monosteel:
"To get the correct shape of the historical original, and keep costs down, the body of the axe is cast in mild steel and the high-carbon edge forge-welded to the body by Eric. "


What gets me is the extra $150 for a length of ash. Even if it's hand fitted, that still makes me scratch my head.
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Arne G.





Joined: 31 Jul 2014

Posts: 115

PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 2:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Victor R. wrote:
Arne G. wrote:
Ryan Hobbs wrote:
Hmmmm, seems a little steep for a monosteel axe. Other fine axe makers offer forge welded axes for similar prices or for a little more, when typically a monosteel axe should be cheaper.
Granted, you can cut the cost down to $350 if you don't get a handle but still, that's a lot of money for a relatively simple and small axe head.
I'm sure it's fine quality, I own several Albion swords and have another on the way, but at the end of the day it's still an axe.


It is not monosteel:
"To get the correct shape of the historical original, and keep costs down, the body of the axe is cast in mild steel and the high-carbon edge forge-welded to the body by Eric. "


What gets me is the extra $150 for a length of ash. Even if it's hand fitted, that still makes me scratch my head.


Have you ever tried to hand fit a haft? It's really a lot of work, even with belt sanders, and not as straight forward as you might think. From the experiences I've had, I would not begrudge paying $150 to spare myself the headache... especially since Eric does make the fitting as historically accurate as possible.
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Craig Peters




PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 9:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The next axe available is a Medium Danish Axe: https://www.albion-swords.com/axes/MediumDanishAxe.htm
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Sam Barris




Location: San Diego, California
Joined: 29 Apr 2004
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 628

PostPosted: Wed 16 Jan, 2019 10:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just placed an order for one of the Danish ones. Sadly, I won't see it until I'm home from deployment, but I look forward to hearing all of your thoughts on them! Happy
Pax,
Sam Barris

"Any nation that draws too great a distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards, and its fighting done by fools." —Thucydides
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Hardy Lewis




Location: United States
Joined: 23 Jul 2018

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu 17 Jan, 2019 10:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I hope they offer a fransisca.
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Victor R.




Location: Klein, Texas
Joined: 28 Jan 2008
Reading list: 4 books

Posts: 299

PostPosted: Thu 17 Jan, 2019 6:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Arne G. wrote:
Victor R. wrote:
Arne G. wrote:
Ryan Hobbs wrote:
Hmmmm, seems a little steep for a monosteel axe. Other fine axe makers offer forge welded axes for similar prices or for a little more, when typically a monosteel axe should be cheaper.
Granted, you can cut the cost down to $350 if you don't get a handle but still, that's a lot of money for a relatively simple and small axe head.
I'm sure it's fine quality, I own several Albion swords and have another on the way, but at the end of the day it's still an axe.


It is not monosteel:
"To get the correct shape of the historical original, and keep costs down, the body of the axe is cast in mild steel and the high-carbon edge forge-welded to the body by Eric. "


What gets me is the extra $150 for a length of ash. Even if it's hand fitted, that still makes me scratch my head.


Have you ever tried to hand fit a haft? It's really a lot of work, even with belt sanders, and not as straight forward as you might think. From the experiences I've had, I would not begrudge paying $150 to spare myself the headache... especially since Eric does make the fitting as historically accurate as possible.


I've refitted heads to axes, mauls and hammers, using hand tools. I learned to do it from my dad before I hit double-digits. Dad was raised on a farm and learned the value of doing such things oneself, and taught those things to me. I know how it's done; I know the amount of effort to do so without a belt sander to shape the haft. So, for me, that is a bit steep.
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Thu 17 Jan, 2019 6:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I love the medium danish axe. I also hope they come out with a francisca. Or a great replica of the Mammen axe.

I have a superb gallowglass axe by Josh davis already, but I would think some of the irish/hibernian/gallowglass styles would be popular. Sparth, Jeddarth styles. They used to do a couple of those styles and I missed out on them.

What's the deal with a cast body? Pros/cons? Durability? Seems like it would be inferior to other options such as spring steel, but I'm not sure. The forge welded edge though, that is great and helps justify the pricing for sure.
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J.D. Crawford




Location: Toronto
Joined: 25 Dec 2006

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PostPosted: Sat 19 Jan, 2019 2:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Victor R. wrote:
I've refitted heads to axes, mauls and hammers, using hand tools. I learned to do it from my dad before I hit double-digits. Dad was raised on a farm and learned the value of doing such things oneself, and taught those things to me. I know how it's done; I know the amount of effort to do so without a belt sander to shape the haft. So, for me, that is a bit steep.


It's great if you can do that yourself, but how long did it take you to learn the skills? To research whether ts historically accurate or not? How long did it take to get the materials and what did they cost? How much do the workshop, tools, power bills, and maintenance cost? How long does it take do the actual work, exchange info with a retailer, make shipments, keep accounting records for taxes? I'm probably missing something.

A professional has to account for all that, and still make enough profit to make a living for themselves, their family, and hopefully have enough left over to retire some day in the context of the current and future cost of living, in this case in the USA. When think of how many hundred dollars a good lawyer charges for one hour of work, I won't begrudge paying an artist for their skills and time.
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Ryan Hobbs




Location: Middle GA
Joined: 19 Jun 2016
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 55

PostPosted: Sat 19 Jan, 2019 7:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It is not monosteel:
"To get the correct shape of the historical original, and keep costs down, the body of the axe is cast in mild steel and the high-carbon edge forge-welded to the body by Eric. "[/quote]

Thanks, I amended my earlier post, sorry about that.

No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.
Hebrews 12:11
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Eric McHugh
Industry Professional



Location: Crown Point, IN
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
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Posts: 427

PostPosted: Fri 25 Jan, 2019 2:18 pm    Post subject: Thanks for the comments         Reply with quote

Thanks for all the positive feedback. Peter, Howy, Mike and myself have discussed for years how to bring axes that have the weight and shape of historic axes to market. After over a year of prototyping, we figured out a cost effective way to produce these axes using modern and historical methods. That is all I will really say about it. Wink

Trust me when I say these axes are far from a piece of plate that is stick welded to a piece of pipe, and hafted with a sledge hammer handle from Ace Hardware. There are countless examples of these, direct from Pakistan, to pick from. The new axe line is designed to look, feel and preform like an original, and we have the research to back it up. Big Grin

In closing, this year will be exciting at Albion. We have a number of new projects in the works. Including more axes that will hit the market in the near future, so if you are not seeing something that trips your trigger, hold onto your hat because there is more to come.

Find me on Facebook, or check out my blog. Contact me at eric@crownforge.net or ericmycue374@comcast.net if you want to talk about a commission or discuss an available piece.
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Leelund K





Joined: 29 Nov 2006

Posts: 76

PostPosted: Sun 01 Aug, 2021 11:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Has anyone tried one of these out yet?

The axe bug has bitten me and I'm curious about the small bearded Viking axe.

When Albion started making their splash in the sword repro scene, they did a thorough job educating the market about why they were better. I don't feel like they have yet on these axes.

Eric McHugh wrote:
Trust me when I say these axes are far from a piece of plate that is stick welded to a piece of pipe, and hafted with a sledge hammer handle from Ace Hardware. There are countless examples of these, direct from Pakistan, to pick from. The new axe line is designed to look, feel and preform like an original, and we have the research to back it up. Big Grin


Eric, would you mind explaining what separates these axes from a design standpoint from others on the market? In what way do they handle differently from a competently made mass produced axe? You expressed excitement at handling the particular original that the small bearded is based off of, what about it excited you? Do you think the small bearded viking is exclusively a weapon or do you think it was a dual purpose work/fighting axe? It looks pretty thick to me.

Thanks


Last edited by Leelund K on Thu 05 Aug, 2021 3:55 am; edited 1 time in total
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Holger Mahling




Location: Germany
Joined: 23 Oct 2012

Posts: 80

PostPosted: Wed 04 Aug, 2021 11:33 pm    Post subject: Albion Axes         Reply with quote

Frankly spoken: Why give in $500 for an Albion axe (and i HAVE some Albion stuff - believe it or not), when i can get a very nicely made piece fron, for example, Peter Szabo, for significantly less? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

https://www.szabo-weaponsmith.com/product-page/viking-axe-with-decorated-head-boar

Thats one of mine. Thats still some money at approx. $350 but its not $500 for a pretty plain piece.
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Leelund K





Joined: 29 Nov 2006

Posts: 76

PostPosted: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 3:52 am    Post subject: Re: Albion Axes         Reply with quote

Holger Mahling wrote:
Frankly spoken: Why give in $500 for an Albion axe (and i HAVE some Albion stuff - believe it or not), when i can get a very nicely made piece fron, for example, Peter Szabo, for significantly less? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


This is precisely what I'm asking. Having handled many Albion swords and quite a few from European makers, I have noticed that they are marginally better and more refined than their notably cheaper European options (though the price gap has shrunk as USD gets weaker v. EURO). Are they better proportionally to the price difference? No, not imo, but I have found them to be better. Sometimes, I'm willing to pay the difference, sometimes I'm not. For certain designs, I think the Indian and Chinese options are good enough!

The thing is I have an idea of what I'm losing and gaining with buying from certain smiths/parts of the world with swords, but I have never handled any high end ax: minus a few heavily modified Cold Steels that a talented friend of mine did. So I'm actually asking the same question you are, just not rhetorically. Haha

Your Szabo axe is gorgeous, btw. How do you like it?
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Jeremy V. Krause




Location: Buffalo, NY.
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 7:03 am    Post subject: Re: Albion Axes         Reply with quote

Holger Mahling wrote:
Frankly spoken: Why give in $500 for an Albion axe (and i HAVE some Albion stuff - believe it or not), when i can get a very nicely made piece fron, for example, Peter Szabo, for significantly less? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

https://www.szabo-weaponsmith.com/product-page/viking-axe-with-decorated-head-boar

Thats one of mine. Thats still some money at approx. $350 but its not $500 for a pretty plain piece.


The very common issue with many axe makers- even some who make nicely proportioned axes is this tendency to leave a kind of "rugged" or "rough" finish.

It's very common and I'm not sure why it's done but there is no reason for us to think that sees weren't finished brightly, just like swords.

Is that etching on your axe? If so that is ahistorical. I'm not even sure if we have evidence of even inscribed/engraved non-inlayed historical axes.

I suspect that this rough look is a modern aesthetic, and for me, detracts from the piece. People just think it looks cool.

I personally like axes made in bloomery or sheer steels- and I don't care for maker's marks - and this costs quite a bit to have done- but all of my axes are finished brightly.

I think the albion axes look nice and don't seem overpriced.


Last edited by Jeremy V. Krause on Thu 05 Aug, 2021 7:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 7:06 am    Post subject: Re: Albion Axes         Reply with quote

[quote="Leelund K"]
Holger Mahling wrote:
I'm willing to pay the difference, sometimes I'm not. For certain designs, I think the Indian and Chinese options are good enough!


I'll heartily disagree with this. Albion and the chinese and Indian makers are night and day, apples and oranges.
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