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Zhenyu Li





Joined: 26 Feb 2016
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PostPosted: Sat 30 Apr, 2016 3:22 am    Post subject: Why called Pallasch         Reply with quote

In an article here said the term Pallasch came from a Turkish word Pala.Why people named it from Turkish?Does this type of sword from Turk?Or being influenced by Turkish swords?Or something else?
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Henrik Zoltan Toth




Location: Hungary
Joined: 18 Feb 2007

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Sat 30 Apr, 2016 11:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The word comes probably from the hungarian pallos and means single edged, long, heavy, broad sword. (maybe in the time after the end of the independence war in 1711, when the first hussar regiments had been formed with hungarian officiers in France, Prussia and Russia)


http://mek.oszk.hu/01800/01885/html/cd5m/kepe...t88053.jpg

"Palló" is the word for a long, wide board. I don't know the origin, our other word for straight swords is "kard" has maybe something to do with the persian kard (knife).
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Zhenyu Li





Joined: 26 Feb 2016
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PostPosted: Sun 01 May, 2016 11:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Henrik Zoltan Toth wrote:
The word comes probably from the hungarian pallos and means single edged, long, heavy, broad sword. (maybe in the time after the end of the independence war in 1711, when the first hussar regiments had been formed with hungarian officiers in France, Prussia and Russia)


http://mek.oszk.hu/01800/01885/html/cd5m/kepe...t88053.jpg

"Palló" is the word for a long, wide board. I don't know the origin, our other word for straight swords is "kard" has maybe something to do with the persian kard (knife).

Thank you very much! Happy Another question I have is when did this kind of blade come out?And did it developed by Hungarian?
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Henrik Zoltan Toth




Location: Hungary
Joined: 18 Feb 2007

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Thu 05 May, 2016 3:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think that was not the case. It was a wide known weapon in Eastern-Europe and in West-Asia, but due to the fact mentioned above the hungarian name became common.
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Zhenyu Li





Joined: 26 Feb 2016
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PostPosted: Sat 07 May, 2016 7:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Henrik Zoltan Toth wrote:
I think that was not the case. It was a wide known weapon in Eastern-Europe and in West-Asia, but due to the fact mentioned above the hungarian name became common.

The name is not the only thing I want to talk about Surprised
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Shahril Dzulkifli




Location: Malaysia
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Tue 17 May, 2016 7:09 am    Post subject: Why called Pallasch         Reply with quote

Believe it or not Pallasch is also a German surname. No one knows its origin but I guess it is derived from the sword's name.
“You have power over your mind - not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength”

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Christopher Treichel




Location: Metro D.C.
Joined: 14 Jan 2010

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PostPosted: Tue 17 May, 2016 9:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

In the 16th and 17th century there were lots of incursions by the Turks into Europe leading to lots of interactions between Poles, Hungarians, Austrians etc with wide spread fighting in the Ukraine and Balkans into Austria . Lots of weapons found popularity on either side. The Poles really liked the long estoc like koncerz and I am not suprised at exchanges in names for the weapons as well. The Saber itself has Turkic origins and a straight saber for heavy cavalry has been popular for a long time as well. The Pallasch specifically refers to a straight saber used by heavy cavalry.
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Zhenyu Li





Joined: 26 Feb 2016
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PostPosted: Tue 17 May, 2016 3:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Christopher Treichel wrote:
In the 16th and 17th century there were lots of incursions by the Turks into Europe leading to lots of interactions between Poles, Hungarians, Austrians etc with wide spread fighting in the Ukraine and Balkans into Austria . Lots of weapons found popularity on either side. The Poles really liked the long estoc like koncerz and I am not suprised at exchanges in names for the weapons as well. The Saber itself has Turkic origins and a straight saber for heavy cavalry has been popular for a long time as well. The Pallasch specifically refers to a straight saber used by heavy cavalry.

Well I thought modern European saber is more like an European back sword become curve and have a different hilt.Some straight saber just have a back sword blade.And at the same time Turkish people did not like to use straight sword so I think it is more likely to be a name from Hungarian?
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Bartek Strojek




Location: Poland
Joined: 05 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Wed 18 May, 2016 1:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Most common etymological explanation indeed is Turkish "pal(l)a" - 'sword'.

https://tr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pala

https://tr.wiktionary.org/wiki/pala

And interestingly enough, Turkish wiktionary claims that etymology is Italian!

Although I would gladly see someone else than Mr.Google translate it.


All this lead to Latin "pala":

"spade, oar, some beam,?"

Derived French words:

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/pale#fr

This one is interesting because it's form is getting very similar to 'Palasch/Pałasz"

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/palastre

And Spanish 'palastro", also meaning plate/beam of steel.

https://es.wiktionary.org/wiki/palastro


So perhaps word would indeed have origins in Turkish, where Italian word was used to note some kind of sword?
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Zhenyu Li





Joined: 26 Feb 2016
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 37

PostPosted: Wed 18 May, 2016 2:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bartek Strojek wrote:
Most common etymological explanation indeed is Turkish "pal(l)a" - 'sword'.

https://tr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pala

https://tr.wiktionary.org/wiki/pala

And interestingly enough, Turkish wiktionary claims that etymology is Italian!

Although I would gladly see someone else than Mr.Google translate it.


All this lead to Latin "pala":

"spade, oar, some beam,?"

Derived French words:

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/pale#fr

This one is interesting because it's form is getting very similar to 'Palasch/Pałasz"

https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/palastre

And Spanish 'palastro", also meaning plate/beam of steel.

https://es.wiktionary.org/wiki/palastro


So perhaps word would indeed have origins in Turkish, where Italian word was used to note some kind of sword?

In the dictionary I use,it shows that Pala means curve sword?And by the way could the sword Pallasch be Hungarian origin?
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