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Addison C. de Lisle




Location: South Carolina
Joined: 05 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Tue 19 Jan, 2010 8:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You could try chasing in some lines with chasing tools, essentially differently shaped metal "punches" (although they're not used as punches). They're easy to make with filing or grinding down steel square stock and heat treating them.

If you mean pierced decorations, you can drill a small hole first, and then cut out your design by threading the sawblade of a jeweler's saw through the hole you cut.

www.addisondelisle.com
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Felix R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Tue 19 Jan, 2010 12:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I thought of this type of decoration as on the Albion Knight scabbard chape.

With cutouts I am already at the process of drilling and filig after all the good recommendation from above.
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Johan S. Moen




Location: Kristiansand, Norway
Joined: 26 Jan 2004

Posts: 259

PostPosted: Tue 19 Jan, 2010 1:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Felix R. wrote:
I thought of this type of decoration as on the Albion Knight scabbard chape.

With cutouts I am already at the process of drilling and filig after all the good recommendation from above.


You probably know this, but the lines radiating from the edges can be easily made with a punch or just a reground chisel. Old screwdrivers are also good for this. The ones running parallel to the cutout-edges probably need to be engraved or chased, although it is possible to punch lines as long as the curve is not too extreme.

Johan Schubert Moen
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Felix R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Tue 19 Jan, 2010 2:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

No, this punching was new to me, this would be the same for curved decorations, so to take a round punch with maybe the half cut away. I now seem to understand what Addison was talking about. Those punches are quite cheep at the tool store. Also cheap screwdrivers might work, have to really sharpen those pieces then I think? Is it possible to do this after shaping of the locket ant chape?
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Addison C. de Lisle




Location: South Carolina
Joined: 05 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Tue 19 Jan, 2010 7:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I had some extra time tonight, so I photographed my tools to share here. For the first picture they are respectively my needle files (the ones I use most often anyway, being the flat, triangular, round, half-round, and flattened triangle for rounding corners), my chasing tools (which I made Happy ), and my jeweler's saw.



Here's a close-up of the ends; they are not sharpened since I don't want them to punch through the metal I'm working on, and they are polished so they leave a polished mark where they hit, rather than acting as a stamp for any texture left behind by their production. They are used by hammering one end with a hammer (I use a chasing hammer), and gently and evenly tracing your design. They aren't so much punches as like a pen that you hammer the end on, if that makes any sense. You sort of "rock" the tools as you use them. If you're going to use a screw driver, just make sure that you soften the edges a bit with a file so there are no sharp edges, and I would recommend sanding to at least 400 grit.



Here's a sample of chasing, which I did in brass with the tools above, just so you can get an idea of what they can do:





Hope this helps.

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Julien M




Location: Austin TX
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PostPosted: Wed 20 Jan, 2010 2:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is getting really interesting...I've been wondering how to do those lines/engraving for a while too.
I've tried dremel cutting wheels and some dremel engraving pointy things but the lines are shallow and far too large.
I guess i'll try punching the lines as you suggest one of these days, with a chisel and hammer...but with no anvil I might end up flattening the shape.

Nice job on matching the two halves of the shape Felix!

Cheers,

J
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Felix R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Wed 20 Jan, 2010 4:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
This is getting really interesting...I've been wondering how to do those lines/engraving for a while too.
I've tried dremel cutting wheels and some dremel engraving pointy things but the lines are shallow and far too large.
I guess i'll try punching the lines as you suggest one of these days, with a chisel and hammer...but with no anvil I might end up flattening the shape.

Nice job on matching the two halves of the shape Felix!

Cheers,

J


Thanks Julien. For the first start I am quite happy with and regarding the decoration, I experienced the same using Dremel tool with diamond points as you did (you can see it on my try of the chasing in the locket). The comments and recommendations of Addison and Johan were very helpful. I was just missing the correct terms as chasing and punching, which yould translate to "Punzieren" (the same for detailing of leather) and "Ziselieren", respectively. Looking for those two terms led to some gold-smith web pages showing their work bench and tools. So I would need those punches for embossing and kind of knifes or modified screwdrivers for the detail work.

Basically, I did hope for this thread to evolve into something, where us hobbyists could share their experience. We all know the professionals out there, that I would like to get a set of fittingas once. But at the moment I would also like to try things myself.
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 20 Jan, 2010 9:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I discovered this morning that the chapes from the narrow-but-thick leather Windlass scabbards will work almost perfectly for a thin wood-core scabbard for a broader blade. Just add cutouts, etc. and flatten the edges a bit. Keep it in mind if, like me, you start to accumulate those Windlass scabbards.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Felix R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Sat 06 Mar, 2010 3:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I now tried to make the mounts for my new Albion I:33 scabbard. Those pieces are made with 1mm brass. Soldering with additional flux and in between acid cleaning does seem to work. I also got some wolfram carbide cutters in the and (thanks for the recommendation Tod), now I can do rough cut outs in minutes Happy
I just have to try how to add a "knob" to the tip of the chape now.



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Dan R




Location: Australia
Joined: 15 Mar 2010

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PostPosted: Thu 10 Jun, 2010 12:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bump. I am interested to see if there has been any more progress. I will be attempting to make my own chape in the near future.

Thanks,

Dan
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Felix R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Thu 10 Jun, 2010 10:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Not yet am working on the locket now, but I don´t have much time. I just soldered it last weekend, now I try to grind in some cutouts and look for a way to attach the rings to connect it to the belt.
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Ozsváth Árpád-István




Location: Romania
Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posts: 131

PostPosted: Fri 11 Jun, 2010 10:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just finished leather work on my scabbard and now I'm in the same boat too...
Just wondering if some copper pipe fittings would make my job easier, something like this:

http://www.traderscity.com/board/userpix35/23...ents-1.jpg

If I could cut it on the inner side and bend it out, this would make a nice U shaped chape.
For decorations I can use the same etching method that worked for my pommel:
1 - trace some symbols with a marker
2 - dip the piece in hot parafine wax (melted candle)
3 - peel of the wax where etching is needed
4- put some mordant solution on it and wait
5 - repeat from step 4 until necessary

My pommel is mild steel, so I used 18K gold tester (HNO3 and HCl, not sure).For copper or bras ferric chloride will be just fine.
Copper and bras can be nickel-plated.
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Ozsváth Árpád-István




Location: Romania
Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posts: 131

PostPosted: Tue 15 Jun, 2010 8:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I started experimenting with some thin cardboard and I found out that you can make a decent chape from one piece. After some careful measurements you can trace a similar pattern as in figure A. After folding it will look like that in figure B.

I still don't have any idea how those chapes were attached to the scabbard. I don't think gluing or compression will hold it firmly in place. This part will take some unwanted abuse, so should I use some rivets? I deliberately left a few centimeters of solid wood near the tip.



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Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Thu 04 Sep, 2014 5:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great information, thanks
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