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Nicholas Rettig




Location: Alexandria, Virginia
Joined: 12 Jul 2006

Posts: 26

PostPosted: Sun 11 Mar, 2007 10:56 pm    Post subject: Handling a Talwar         Reply with quote

I have recently acquired a Talwar that has been in the family for a while and while it is very pretty I have been having alot of trouble swinging it. The disc at the bottom keeps cutting into my hand and i was wondering if i could avoid that. I have tried looping a finger over one of the quillons, which just doesn't feel right. And swinging it in a different position with my palm over the disc, which takes away power. I was wondering if i was doing it wrong or if it is just too smaal for my hands. Any advice would be appreciated, thanks in advance.

BTW, first ever post.
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Fabrice Cognot
Industry Professional



Location: Dijon
Joined: 29 Sep 2004

Posts: 354

PostPosted: Mon 12 Mar, 2007 3:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Probably too small (most are for quite small hands) - also, try not to hold it too tight, but with 'relaxed' fingers and palm.

Cheers

Fab

PhD in medieval archeology.
HEMAC member
De Taille et d'Estoc director
Maker of high quality historical-inspired pieces.
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Thaddeus Burns





Joined: 10 Mar 2007

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Mon 12 Mar, 2007 9:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wear a glove?
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Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 2,652

PostPosted: Tue 13 Mar, 2007 10:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Was the pommel cutting into your hand or into your wrist? If your statement was literal and it was really cutting into your hand, then the grip is indeed too small for you.
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Steven Hughes




Location: North Bend WA USA
Joined: 25 Feb 2016

Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu 25 Feb, 2016 4:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I too found the talwar grip to be rather uncomfortable, & also concluded it was for smaller hands. I was mistaken. The disk has a purpose, that of forcing one to grip it in a manner that encourages use of the talwar as a slashing weapon. The best explanation & demonstration is found in this excellent YouTube video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BoKUfaorJ0
I hope this is useful.
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Bob Haynes




Location: Mount Perry, Ohio
Joined: 06 Apr 2008
Likes: 16 pages

Posts: 56

PostPosted: Thu 25 Feb, 2016 5:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Steven Hughes wrote:
I too found the talwar grip to be rather uncomfortable, & also concluded it was for smaller hands. I was mistaken. The disk has a purpose, that of forcing one to grip it in a manner that encourages use of the talwar as a slashing weapon. The best explanation & demonstration is found in this excellent YouTube video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BoKUfaorJ0
I hope this is useful.


There happens to be a very similar discussion on Viking age swords that promotes the same theory.
Although a differant weapon, I agree having tried this with my Cold Steel Kukri machete -which used to chew up my palm before I tried this- with success.

http://myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=247...mp;start=0


Last edited by Bob Haynes on Thu 25 Feb, 2016 10:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Travis Canaday




Location: Overland Park, Kansas
Joined: 24 Oct 2005

Posts: 143

PostPosted: Thu 25 Feb, 2016 7:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matt Easton's youtube videos are great. His discussion of the tulwar is what lead me to buying a couple of them. The disc is essentially there to lock the hand in place and encourage the use of draw cuts powered by the shoulder. This is different than western saber where one can cut using the wrist and elbow. With a tulwar, you shouldn't be bending the wrist much. This shortens your reach, but encourages powerful drawing cuts. Shorter range might not be so bad, because the tulwar was almost always used with a shield (dahl) when fighting on foot.

Unless you have massive hands, most tulwar grips will work fine once you stiffen up your wrist (sword almost 90 degrees with forearm) and start swinging with the shoulder. That's broadly speaking. You will still be using elbow and wrist a bit. It took some time for me to get used to it, but now I have no problem.

Good luck!

Travis
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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 08 May 2009
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Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 1,491

PostPosted: Fri 26 Feb, 2016 1:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Still, even with normal-size hands, you can find tulwar grips that are too small. And too large, too. Too large and you can still fit your hand on the hilt, but it doesn't work as well as one the right size.

That's why you find small hilts: people with small hands want small hilts for their tulwars. People with large hands need large hilts. Get a hilt that's the right size for your hand, and put it on the blade that you want. Not so easy for most people today, but in the right time and right place, it was easy enough.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Lee Pupo




Location: Pennsylvania
Joined: 30 Mar 2014

Posts: 26

PostPosted: Fri 26 Feb, 2016 8:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I agree wholeheartedly with keeping the wrist straight (as long as you make sure to keep the hand -and the rest of the body - relaxed). Focus on the footwork and letting your body deliver the weapon. Your hand is an excellent guide for the force that your body and gravity are capable of. If you get the hang of that, try messing with Meyer's rose and perhaps some of the master cuts and additional techniques from Dobringer. You'd be surprised how sneakily your weapon will be able to suppress hands or faces. Are you guys familiar with the master in this video series?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLTcVJGMBkQ

He nails it, in my view. Watch how he takes the hands or the centers of his students again and again, applying big cuts to clear space or to deal finishing blows. It should be helpful. Interestingly enough, he seems to have a certain amount of allowance for grip changes or letting the wrist bend (though I think the more extreme bending seen when he's finished and is driving his student to the ground is more of an artifact of the demonstration setting). Parts 2 and 3 especially show the ability of a tulwar user to flick the tip (or the razor sharp curve where a straight sword's tip would be) about with precision to contest the geometry of the fight. Cool
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