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Richard Fay




Location: Upstate New York
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 9:03 am    Post subject: "calendar sword"         Reply with quote

Hello all!
I recently ran across a very interesting, perhaps unique, rapier in Claude Blair's European and American Arms. It's plate 124 in that work. The description states that this "Pappenheimer" rapier, supposedly used by the Doge Francesco Morosini (1618-94) has a perpetual calendar etched into the blade!
I've heard of a "calendar girl" (in an old Paul Anka song, I believe), but I've never heard of a "calendar sword" before. Unfortunately, the photo in the book does not show the whole blade, only the hilt. Does anyone have a full-length picture of that particular weapon, or know of any other examples of swords or other weapons that have engravings or carvings that perform a practical function?
(By the way, wouldn't a calendar featuring Nathan's photography or photo collection be nice? Happy )
(I know, maybe modern makers could mount a clock or compass in the pommel of a "survival sword"! Laughing Out Loud )
Stay safe!

"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did! I'm going to recite poetry!"
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Richard Fay




Location: Upstate New York
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 9:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oops!
I think I posted this in the wrong topic. I'm still fairly new at this.
Could a moderator please move this to the right spot?
Thanks!
(Let me know if I should have asked this in a pm. Remember, I'm still new to this whole "forum" thing!)

"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did! I'm going to recite poetry!"
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Tony G.




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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 10:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Neil Sedarka I think. Sorry cant spell it.
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Richard Fay




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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 10:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tony G. wrote:
Quote:
Neil Sedarka I think. Sorry cant spell it.


Tony,
You may be right! The song was a little bit before my time. Big Grin
I was being silly with some of my comments, but I was serious about the rapier. Really unusual, that one!
Stay safe!

"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did! I'm going to recite poetry!"
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Greyson Brown




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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 10:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am not familiar with the sword you are refering to, so I can't really be of help there. As for a clock mounted in a sword pommel, there is an historical example of that. It can be found in a forum thread by Nathan Robinson in the Historical Arms Forum. The thread subject was Rapier Time, Watch This or something to that effect. You should be able to find it without too much effort.

-Grey

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Richard Fay




Location: Upstate New York
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 11:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
Quote:
I am not familiar with the sword you are refering to, so I can't really be of help there. As for a clock mounted in a sword pommel, there is an historical example of that. It can be found in a forum thread by Nathan Robinson in the Historical Arms Forum. The thread subject was Rapier Time, Watch This or something to that effect. You should be able to find it without too much effort.


Greyson,
Thanks! I guess my comments were not as silly as they seemed. Interesting stuff.

By the way, thanks, guys, for putting this in the right talk!
Stay safe!

"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did! I'm going to recite poetry!"
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 8:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Richard Fay wrote:
[By the way, thanks, guys, for putting this in the right talk!


No problem.

I remember reading about a calendar sword somewhere, too, but I can't seem to find it. There are a couple of swords (1 blade and 1 complete sword with "schrittzähler" in the blades. I don't know what that translates to, though.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 8:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There are many, many hunting weapons with calendars engraved/etched on their blades surviving. Attached below are examples.

The first is a German silver-mounted hunting trousse. The chopper's blade is engraved with the calender of the year 1678. It's from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

The second is a hunting sword, circa 1550. On the blade is a calendar dated 1686, bearing the name Adam Ehinger, Landleutenant of Stadtamhof, near Regensburg. From the Tower of London, likely now at Leeds.

The third example is another chopper from a hunting trousse, circa 1540 and from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. It has a calendar blade and wheelock pistol.


I'm sorry I don't have time to source more examples.



 Attachment: 35.43 KB
trousse01.jpg
German Trousse, circa 1678
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art


 Attachment: 23.27 KB
trousse02.jpg
Hunting chopper and wheelock pistol, circa 1540
The Metropolitan Museum of Art


 Attachment: 18.08 KB
hsword.jpg
Hunting sword, circa 1550
Tower of London, likely now at Leeds


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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 9:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That wheelock chopper is really interesting in a weird sort of way: I can imagine that one could shoot that really unhappy and wounded wild boar before getting close enough to hack at it. Or shoot at it if it was only playing possum ! Those wild boars can be really dangerous. I think Cesare Borgia used to hunt wild board with a sword: If you missed the boar the boar wouldn't miss you !
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 9:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The chopper's are used to dismantle an animal after it's already dead, which makes the addition of the wheellock even that more interesting.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 05 Oct, 2006 9:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
The chopper's are used to dismantle an animal after it's already dead, which makes the addition of the wheellock even that more interesting.


Yeah, I see this more as a backup to kill a wounded animal before the dismantling, just in case !. Razz

Might also be a nasty surprise if one should encounter bandits / poachers ( also known as starving peasants with a bad attitude. )

Probably just because it was a " cool " idea ? It does seem like a better than average combining of gun and knife i.e. good design that looks less clunky than some aesthetically: Borderland usable.

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Richard Fay




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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 9:36 am    Post subject: nice pictures!         Reply with quote

Nathan,
Thanks! I was hoping you would have something to post regarding this, but I didn't realize that this was actually common on hunting weapons. I guess the rapier wasn't really that unique after all.
Now I'm going to have to dig through my books and see if I can find any examples in my library.
I wonder, could I incorporate this idea into a novel? Hmmm....
Thanks again!
Stay safe!

"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did! I'm going to recite poetry!"
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Richard Fay




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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 10:35 am    Post subject: another "calendar sword"...         Reply with quote

Hello all!
I've found another one, in case anyone is interested!
The military sword of King George II, number 26 in the Treasures from the Tower of London catalogue compiled by A. V. B. Norman and G. M. Wilson, has a calendar etched onto the blade. It's a Solingen blade by Johannis Brach. There is even a detail from the calendar in the book. The entry says the sword is also in European Swords and Daggers in the Tower of London by Dufty and Borg.
Sorry about not being able to post a picture; my scanner is one of those that only scans in single pages. Unlike my rather tattered copy of Records of the Medieval Sword, my copy of Treasures from the Tower of London has not yet fallen apart!
Stay safe!

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 12:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here you go, Richard.
Sword of King George II (1683-1760). This is a fine example of an early eighteenth-century military sword. The blade is etched with a calendar and signed Johannes Brach (of Solingen).

Royal Armouries, IX 1243



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ix1243.jpg
Military Sword of King George II with calendar on blade
Royal Armouries, IX 1243


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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 12:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This example is a 17th-century calendar blade mated to a British cavalry officer's sword, circa 1760. The blade is etched with the portrait heads of Frederick V, King of Bohemia, Enrst, Count of Mansfeld, Prince Maurice of Nassau, and Prince Frederick Henry of Nassau, all of whom were prominent leaders of the Protestant faction in the Thirty Years War. The blade is also etched with a calendar and stamped with the crowned-head mark of Johannes Wunder of Solingen.


 Attachment: 72.4 KB
17thcenturycalendarblade.jpg
17th-century calendar blade mated to a British cavalry officer's sword, circa 1760
From the Royal Armouries, Leeds


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Richard Fay




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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 1:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks again, Nathan!
The craftsmanship involved in these pieces is extraordinary.
Nice pictures!

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 2:09 pm    Post subject: Re: "calendar sword"         Reply with quote

Richard Fay wrote:
(I know, maybe modern makers could mount a clock or compass in the pommel of a "survival sword"!)


I know this is off-topic here, but it's a good pointer to another topic:

http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=2580

Please check that out and comment there if you have the time.

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Richard Fay




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PostPosted: Fri 06 Oct, 2006 3:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan,
Thanks yet again!
I didn't get around to searching for that topic thread.
The link was greatly appreciated.
Beautiful rapier and dagger!
Thanks!

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