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Jens Nordlunde





Joined: 06 Jan 2004

Posts: 29

PostPosted: Wed 07 Jan, 2004 1:43 pm    Post subject: Indian weapons         Reply with quote

Hi I am new here, and I have started to wonder, if I am the only one interested in Indan weapons?
Here is an Adya Katti with the seal of Coorg.

Regards

Jens



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J. Padgett




Location: In a comfy chair
Joined: 17 Nov 2003

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PostPosted: Wed 07 Jan, 2004 2:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm fond of tulwars, but don't know much about other weapons of Indian origin except a little about katars. That Adya Katti thing is pretty nice though; very mean looking.
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Geoff Wood




Location: UK
Joined: 31 Aug 2003

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PostPosted: Wed 07 Jan, 2004 3:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi
I expect there are lots of people here interested. I am, but I have very little knowledge, beyond that some of their work is stunning (to judge from the Wallace collection) and that Katars are a fascinating idea.
Geoff
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Wed 07 Jan, 2004 4:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That weapon, photographed above, is absolutely stunning. Can you give me an impression of its size? How long is that piece? I have no point of reference to really judge.

Thanks!

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Jens Nordlunde





Joined: 06 Jan 2004

Posts: 29

PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2004 7:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Nathan,

Sorry I wrote in the wrong place.

The whole Adya Katti is 55 cm, the blade is 42 cm and the broadest part it is 10.5 cm.
See also Stone's A Glossary, Moplah Knives page 454 and 456.

Here is a little history about these knives:
Coorg is a small state on the West coast if India North of Malabar. These region was colonial Muslim strongholds, dominated by Tipu Sultan at the end of 18th Century.
Coorg is anglicized corruption of Kodagu, which is said to come from the Kanarese Kudu, ’steep’ or ’hilly’. Coorg came under British rule in 1834, and twenty years later the magistrate wanted to stop the constant attacks by the Mapillas (local dialect for Muslims) against non-Muslims. The weapons the Muslims used, known as 'ayudha katti' (=war knife) or Konunga Katti (=curved knife), were outlawed. After another violent outbreak in 1884 more than 15000 knives were confiscated and most of them dumped in the sea, only a small number of selected knives were permitted to go into museums.

I have only seen four Adya Kattis, and in all fourth are the seal of Coorg. In two it is stamped into the steel and in the two others the seal is inlaid in silver. The strange thing is, that the stamped seals look alike, but they are different from the inlaid once. See the picture below. The stamped seal is 0.5 cm.



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Thomas McDonald
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Location: New Hampshire
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PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2004 10:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Checkout this site : http://www.ashokaarts.com/edgedweapons/edgedweapons.htm

Threy have some nice looking Indian pieces , including a Katti, never delt with them though ?

Mac

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Jens Nordlunde





Joined: 06 Jan 2004

Posts: 29

PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2004 1:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you Thomas,

I know of them, but I have never dealt with them.
From what I can see, they have a Pichangatti and a Molaph knife, of interest to this discussion.

Regards

Jens
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Andrew Winston




Location: Florida, USA
Joined: 17 Nov 2003

Posts: 93

PostPosted: Fri 09 Jan, 2004 12:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Jens. Nice to see you here. Wink

I continue to be impressed by your collection every time I see another piece. Thanks for sharing!

That Adya is really beautiful. As usual, I've little to add to the information provided by Jens. Of interest, however, is that these knives/swords do not have scabbards. Instead, they utilize an ingeneous suspension system integrated into a belt.

Mac, Stefan from Ashoka is a nice guy to deal with. I've purchased several pieces from him, and I'm, generally, pleased with his offerings.

"I gave 'em a sword. And they stuck it in, and they twisted it with relish.
And I guess if I had been in their position, I'd have done the same thing."
-Richard Milhous Nixon
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Jens Nordlunde





Joined: 06 Jan 2004

Posts: 29

PostPosted: Fri 09 Jan, 2004 1:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Andrew,

Thank's you for your welcome.
It seems to me theat there should be some more Indian things shown here Big Grin so I will try.
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Jens Nordlunde





Joined: 06 Jan 2004

Posts: 29

PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 10:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

After a long time I have started to write here again.
I do have a new comment on the mark of the Adya Katti's, the mark on the blade is not the mark of the ruler or anyones mark - the mark is the mark of 'OM' - the Universial sound.
I have not seen it on weapons from anywhere in India before - so it is unique.
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 10:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Indian weapons are very interesting. Many have a combination of functionality and elegance. More pics please.
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen and Sword Books
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Shahril Dzulkifli




Location: Malaysia
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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 6:00 pm    Post subject: Indian weapons         Reply with quote

I agree with J. Padgett. I am also interested in Indian weapons especially tulwars.

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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 6:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm with Dan and Shahril--Indian weapons are fascinating. My brain is a little full with Japanese, Ancient and European blades right now, but I have long thought tulwars and katars are wonderful also. Some great daggers--khanjars and kards. Such diversity and finesse. Please more pics!
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Eric S




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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 7:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Indian haladie (double bladed dagger) from the Rajput warriors of India. All steel forged construction including the handle, with two double edged blades and a knuckle guard. The knuckle guard would have had a third small straight blade sticking out, but it is missing with only an attachment hole remaining. 26" overall with two 10 1/2" Blades. 19th century or earlier.
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Ben Coomer




Location: Colorado
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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 9:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sweet. I'm always interested in regional weaponry. Do you happen to have sources on how to use some of these? Getting a picture seems only half the story behind them.
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Ruel A. Macaraeg





Joined: 25 Aug 2003

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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 10:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Two of my Indian swords with matching kits and friends.

1. Arival, 18thc Malabar: http://www.forensicfashion.com/1766NayarPriest.html


2. Talwar, 19thc Rajasthan: http://www.forensicfashion.com/1858RajputPrince.html

http://ForensicFashion.com/CostumeStudies.html
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Eric S




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PostPosted: Mon 28 Jul, 2014 11:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ben Coomer wrote:
Sweet. I'm always interested in regional weaponry. Do you happen to have sources on how to use some of these? Getting a picture seems only half the story behind them.


Here is a good example of Indian weapons being used.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_cX1SwiC1Y

You tube search for sikh weapons. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_cX1SwiC1Y
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Ben Coomer




Location: Colorado
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PostPosted: Tue 29 Jul, 2014 12:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you, Eric.

I'll be watching YouTube for a while it looks like.
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Tue 29 Jul, 2014 1:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ruel A. Macaraeg wrote:
Two of my Indian swords with matching kits and friends.

1. Arival, 18thc Malabar: http://www.forensicfashion.com/1766NayarPriest.html


2. Talwar, 19thc Rajasthan: http://www.forensicfashion.com/1858RajputPrince.html


woah, that sickle ended sword... that reminds me SO much of the dothraki arakh (might have been the weapon GRRM was thinking of when he designed it)

for me, the talwar is pretty cool but for me its the unusual pole arms that i like.
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Eric S




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PostPosted: Wed 30 Jul, 2014 5:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

William P wrote:


for me, the talwar is pretty cool but for me its the unusual pole arms that i like.



I like Indian maces, no other country had as many different types.
Quote:
Indian (mughal) shishpar (flanged mace), 17th century, made entirely of steel, head formed of nine flanges, below a domed finial, and a cylindrical haft with a Khanda sword type basket hilt. Overall length: 79 cm (31 in).





Quote:
Indian shishpar (flanged mace), steel with solid shaft and eight flanged head, 24in.

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