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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 2:55 pm    Post subject: Trio for Solingen Show 2006         Reply with quote

This year I finished three swords for the Knife Maker Show at the Deutsches Klingenmuseum in Solingen:
-a XVIIIC of fairly robust domensions (weight about 1.6 kilos). This type can be agile and very agressive cutters. After having done this, I feel eager to make more wide bladed swords of this size or larger.
-a long slender XVIIIb inspired by a sword in the Landesmuseum in Zürich, but with influences of decorative elements from a longs sword in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich. A quick and gracefull type of sword: a type it is always pleasant to return to.
-an Estock of early 16th C type. These blades are very nasty looking and feel quite murderous when in your hand. I really like this style of hilt and enjoy the filework involved. I will explore this further in future projects.

To get an idea of their size, the estock and the XVIIIb have blades of some 95-98 cm in length, while the XVIIIb has a blade width of about 7,5 cm at the guard with a length around 88 cm.

I try to explore somewhat new things in what I bring for the show in Solingen each year. Sometimes it is new types, sometimes variations in styles.
This year I played with filework (the hilt of the estoc) and partially wire wrapped and tooled leather grip (on the XVIIIb).
The XVIIIC sword is a type I long have wanted to do. I feel attracted to types that have strong and sometimes unusua features, such as unusual blade thickness, width or length or hilts with elements and styles that provide some new areas to explore.
It can be small or sublte things, just to keep work interesting. To be able to do work without previous expectations from customers is very liberating and allow me to explore unforseen opportunities as the sword grows closer to completion. This is why I now prefer to work on awailable-now basis, rather than defined custom orders. I see how this tend to result in both better swords *and* happier customers.

I include a series of photos of the three swords.
Hope you enjoy.

Thanks!



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Last edited by Peter Johnsson on Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:43 pm; edited 5 times in total
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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

WOW! These are absolutely gorgeous! The tooled leather is outrageous! Damn fine work......
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Wolfgang Armbruster





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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

These pieces are simply awesome beyond belief, absolutely stunning in their subtle aesthetics which is something I absolutely prefer over in your face designs.

I guess the XVIIIb must be very light and fast. The branch pommel and the complex guard are fantastic.
Since you said the sword with the wire-grip is an estoc I'd like to know if it has a sharp edge or is it sharp only at the point?


Last edited by Wolfgang Armbruster on Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Angus Trim




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeez Peter, that stuff belongs in a museum.........

Gorgeous work...........

swords are fun
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Kevin Iseli
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eek!
Agreed... absolutely awe-inspiring. Brilliant work!

--Kevin Iseli
Elvenarts scabbard shop
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wolfgang Armbruster wrote:
These pieces are simply awesome beyond belief, absolutely stunning in their subtle aesthetics which is something I absolutely prefer over in your face designs.

I guess the XVIIIb must be very light and fast. The branch pommel and the complex guard are fantastic.
Since you said the sword with the wire-grip is an estoc I'd like to know if it has a sharp edge or is it sharp only at the point?


Thanks guys! Happy

To avoid any misunderstanding: the estoc is the one with fileworked hilt. The blade is sharpened so that it allowes for blade to blade contact with minimal wear or damage. With a thrusting sword of this type you will expect opposing blades to glance, glide and deflect quite a bit during swordplay. As cutting is not the real forte of this type, you shape the sharpness so that it can do some limited cutting of exposed areas, but it is used really mostly for thrusting. The forte of the blade is completely unsharpened (that is why there is no need for a ricasso to allow fingering the guard). The foible is capable of some cutting of exposed unarmored areas. To be effective as a thruster you still need a good sharpness of the point and point area. Here the edge is shaped as the direct continuation of the hollow grinding. further back towards the forte, the edge is shaped with a rather stout and short apple seed section.

The one with a grip sporting tooled leather and partial wire wrap is an XVIIIa. It is bordering towards favouring thrusting rather than cutting, but is capable of both. It is a fast and pretty light fencing sword.
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W. Schütz
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 3:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

These are the most beutiful things my eyes have graced upon for a long time.
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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 4:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice.

Do these already have homes then?

"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
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Steve Grisetti




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 4:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow. Three more superb examples of Peter's artistry. I would love to have any one of them!
"...dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skilful, and deadly."
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Rod Parsons




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 5:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Almost lost for words here. I want them... Worried
Rod.
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 5:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What I like the most is that no matter how great the aesthetics are, and they are GREAT ! These sword just scream real using period weapons.

And thank for posting these Peter. Cool

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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B. Stark
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 5:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

One of those is going to be mine!

















YEAH RIGHT!
Awesome as usual Peter. Now I see why you were so busy!

"Wyrd bi∂ ful aræd"

Are we at last brought to such humiliating and debasing degradation, that we cannot be trusted with arms for our defense?

Patrick Henry
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Brian M




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 7:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'll take all three.

Brian M
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Geoff Freeman




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 8:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eek!

Peter, you are amazing...

Geoffrey C. Freeman
Durendal Fencing Club
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 8:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you for sharing this with us, Peter. It's been quite some time since we last saw examples of your work and I'm thrilled to say it was worth the wait. I'm glad to see you further exploring new areas of the craft. These examples look brilliant.
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Steven H




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 10:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The estock looks to me like it good be a direct predecessor to a rapier form.

Is that an accurate interpretation?

Oh and they are gorgeous.
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Herbert Schmidt




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 11:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, the XVIIIa has already got a home... guess where Big Grin

It is incredible fast and light and still delivers a good cut not to speak of the thrust. I really like it very much. It lets you exploit every error your opponent shows due to its wonderful handling. I do own another of Peters swords and although it is completely different type you still feel something.... well.. similiar. You can feel the intent in the blade and it speaks to you very differently from any Albion, Moc, Barta, Trim or any other makers sword. I just love the things Peter does.

Hey Peter - don't forget you still owe me my one handed beaty! Maybe in Solingen next year?

Herbert

www.arsgladii.at
Historical European Martial Arts
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Taylor Ellis




PostPosted: Tue 11 Jul, 2006 11:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Those are fantastic Peter. You really need to get more pictures of your work online! Happy
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Martin Wallgren




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PostPosted: Wed 12 Jul, 2006 12:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Helt fantastiska vapen Peter!

They are soooo nice! I envy you all who own them!

Swordsman, Archer and Dad
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Roger Hooper




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PostPosted: Wed 12 Jul, 2006 6:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wondrous swords -- it is sad that we can only look at the photographs. If we could hold them in our hands and feel the balance and quality, it would be even more wondrous.

It's good to see that XVIIIc as there are so few examples around. But my favorite is the XVIIIa with the "U" type pommel. If that sword was belted at my side, I would not be walking, I'd be strutting.
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