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Wolfgang Armbruster





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PostPosted: Thu 27 Apr, 2006 4:29 am    Post subject: Medieval collection of the Germanisches Nationalmuseum....         Reply with quote

... in Nuremburg becomes once again accessible to the public! Big Grin
So in case you're coming to Germany (maybe for the soccer world championship), don't miss this Happy


Quote:
Quote:

The Middle Ages
Reinstallation of the Medieval Galleries
Opening April 27, 2006
With the opening of the new galleries, one of the preeminent medieval collections in Europe becomes once again accessible to the public. The new presentation focuses on the art and culture of the German-speaking world from the early Middle Ages to the beginning of the 15th century. This epoch is one of the core collecting areas of the Germanisches Nationalmuseum. Beginning with treasury art and early medieval bronzes and ranging from sculpture in wood and stone to stained glass, earliest panel paintings and precious textiles, a wide array of exceptional works are coherently brought together in the lucid new presentation. The culture of the early and high Middle Ages unfolds before the eyes of the visitor in a fascinating panorama. Never before has the web of associations between various genres within the medieval cosmos been so vividly apparent.


Among the objects should be a few very nice arms and armour related items.

http://www.gnm.de/Ausstellungen/sammlung_ma.htm
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Thu 27 Apr, 2006 6:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Figures! I leave Germany in just a couple of weeks, and now I have to try to cram a trip to Nuremburg into my moving schedule. Big Grin

Thanks for the information!

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Wolfgang Armbruster





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PostPosted: Thu 27 Apr, 2006 9:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just heard a review on the radio (Bayern 5) by accident. The commentator said that the new exhibition is a bit dissapointing, but not because the objects are of low quality (quite the opposite) but because there's simply too much. It just overwhelms you since the rooms are so stuffed Cool

Some of the items of the arms and armour collection Big Grin





More examples: http://www.gnm.de/Sammlungen/Sammlung_Waffen_H.htm
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Thu 27 Apr, 2006 10:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that helm. Yup, it's time for a train ride Exclamation

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Fri 28 Apr, 2006 12:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That helm is very cool!
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Apr, 2006 2:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, I'm back from Nuremburg! Let me start by saying that there is easily a full day's worth of museum there; maybe two. Unfortunately, I wasn't feeling my best when I woke up this morning, and my stamina gave out after a couple of hours. It was still worth the trip.

I didn't really know where I was going at first, but I managed to get out of the Bahnhoff in the right direction, and then found a map. There were also street signs, so I didn't have any trouble making it there. Worse case senario, I could have hopped a cab, but why do that for a 2-3 block walk? The museum is open from 10am to 6pm most days (10-9 on Wednesdays, and closed Mondays), and admission is 5 Euro (4 if you are a student). All of that info can be found in the link that Wolfgang provided, but there it is in plain English, if it helps. The admission counter is discreetly located to your right as you walk in (I almost walked right past it), and directly accross the lobby is an area with lockers for storing your coat, etc. (this is a big plus for me, as I wear a fedora, but try to keep from having it on indoors; the locker meant I didn't have to carry my hat around all day). You have to put one Euro in the lock to get the key to turn, but you get your euro back when you open it back up.

The Mittelalter (Medieval) exhibit is apparently still being populated, as there are a couple of empty rooms that you cannot enter. Still, the things that are on display are really nice. There is a Carolingian sword and several spear heads, as well as an Ulfbert sword with a gold covered guard and pommel. There is also quite a bit of stained glass (one of those things that always gets my attention), as well as lots of textiles and some paintings. Most of these have as their theme, the arrest or crucifiction of Christ, so there is plenty to stimulate the militant mind (including some rather unique boxy, multi-lame bevors).

The bulk of the arms and armour can be found by following the blue text signs that read "20 Jahrhundred." They will direct you to a room filled with weapons and sporting arms from the ninth century up to the 19th. One of the pieces that really caught my attention here was a Type XIIa sword in the first display case. I would guess the blade length to be about 37 inches (+/-2"), and it has very acute point that caused me to think it was a Type XVIa at first glance. The pommel also straddles types. It is a Type J, but rather than having the single slope, this pommel tapers in two stages in such a manner that betrays its connection to Type I. The part that I loved was the stars/crosses that run along the outside of the pommel. They add a very regal touch to an already elegent sword. There was also an interesting piece (I would call it a small sword, but the blade was single edged and gently (but deliberately) curved) with an adjustable stirup hilt. Two bars apparently lock alongside the main stirup, but can be released and are held open with (rather stout looking) springs to form a rudimentary basket hilt.

Other rooms within the museum have things such as cabinets, glassware, chairs (including some c.1965 WTF?! ), and even a large room dedicated soley to musical instruments (no doubt in anticipation of a visit from Chad). I would disagree with the comment that the exhibits are stuffed. There is plenty to see, but none of it really feels crammed together. If any of these rooms is crowded, then so is the British Museum, the Tower of London, the Mainfrankisches Museum, the City of Fort Collins Museum and every other museum I've been in. I had a good time and highly recomend that anyone who has a chance stops by this museum for a visit. I took about 100+ pictures (they do permit non-flash photography) that I will try to get uploaded to the albums, but for now, here are the pieces mentioned above.

-Grey



 Attachment: 31.03 KB
mittelalter.JPG
Carolingian sword and spears.

 Attachment: 29.25 KB
Ulfbert.JPG
The large one is an Ulfbert sword.

 Attachment: 17.77 KB
XIIa1.JPG
Type XIIa.

 Attachment: 5.23 KB
XIIaPommel.JPG
Pommel detail.

 Attachment: 19.24 KB
Adjustable hilt.JPG
Adjustable stirup/basket hilt.

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company


Last edited by Greyson Brown on Sat 29 Apr, 2006 10:42 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Apr, 2006 7:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the pics, Grey. It is not likely that I will be in Nürnberg any time soon. The Ulfbert hilt is beautiful!
"...dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skilful, and deadly."
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Sat 29 Apr, 2006 7:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Are the spearheads in the first picture as huge as they look ? Impressive. Eek!

Thanks for the pictures. Cool

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Apr, 2006 10:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Are the spearheads in the first picture as huge as they look ? Impressive. Eek!

Thanks for the pictures. Cool


That picture is a little distorted, but they are pretty big spears. All of them have blades in the 12" range (my estimation). The black one on the far right has a socket that is 1.5-1.75 inches in diameter. Eek! Of course, the one on the far left is only about half an inch.

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company


Last edited by Greyson Brown on Tue 02 May, 2006 12:54 am; edited 1 time in total
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Wolfgang Armbruster





Joined: 03 Apr 2005

Posts: 322

PostPosted: Sun 30 Apr, 2006 2:43 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Greyson,
Thx a lot for your report and the pics! Happy
I'm definitely going to visit that exhibition. I guess it will still be open in two months Wink
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Hisham Gaballa





Joined: 27 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Sun 30 Apr, 2006 5:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
Well, I'm back from Nuremburg! Let me start by saying that there is easily a full day's worth of museum there; maybe two. Unfortunately, I wasn't feeling my best when I woke up this morning, and my stamina gave out after a couple of hours. It was still worth the trip.

I didn't really know where I was going at first, but I managed to get out of the Bahnhoff in the right direction, and then found a map. There were also street signs, so I didn't have any trouble making it there. Worse case senario, I could have hopped a cab, but why do that for a 2-3 block walk? The museum is open from 10am to 6pm most days (10-9 on Wednesdays, and closed Mondays), and admission is 5 Euro (4 if you are a student). All of that info can be found in the link that Wolfgang provided, but there it is in plain English, if it helps. The admission counter is discreetly located to your right as you walk in (I almost walked right past it), and directly accross the lobby is an area with lockers for storing your coat, etc. (this is a big plus for me, as I wear a fedora, but try to keep from having it on indoors; the locker meant I didn't have to carry my hat around all day). You have to put one Euro in the lock to get the key to turn, but you get your euro back when you open it back up.

The Mittelalter (Medieval) exhibit is apparently still being populated, as there are a couple of empty rooms that you cannot enter. Still, the things that are on display are really nice. There is a Carolingian sword and several spear heads, as well as an Ulfbert sword with a gold covered guard and pommel. There is also quite a bit of stained glass (one of those things that always gets my attention), as well as lots of textiles and some paintings. Most of these have as their theme, the arrest or crucifiction of Christ, so there is plenty to stimulate the militant mind (including some rather unique boxy, multi-lame bevors).

The bulk of the arms and armour can be found by following the blue text signs that read "20 Jahrhundred." They will direct you to a room filled with weapons and sporting arms from the ninth century up to the 19th. One of the pieces that really caught my attention here was a Type XIIa sword in the first display case. I would guess the blade length to be about 37 inches (+/-2"), and it has very acute point that caused me to think it was a Type XVIa at first glance. The pommel also straddles types. It is a Type J, but rather than having the single slope, this pommel tapers in two stages in such a manner that betrays its connection to Type I. The part that I loved was the stars/crosses that run along the outside of the pommel. They add a very regal touch to an already elegent sword. There was also an interesting piece (I would call it a small sword, but the blade was single edged and gently (but deliberately) curved) with an adjustable stirup hilt. Two bars apparently lock alongside the main stirup, but can be released and are held open with (rather stout looking) springs to form a rudimentary basket hilt.

Other rooms within the museum have things such as cabinets, glassware, chairs (including some c.1965 WTF?! ), and even a large room dedicated soley to musical instruments (no doubt in anticipation of a visit from Chad). I would disagree with the comment that the exhibits are stuffed. There is plenty to see, but none of it really feels crammed together. If any of these rooms is crowded, then so is the British Museum, the Tower of London, the Mainfrankisches Museum, the City of Fort Collins Museum and every other museum I've been in. I had a good time and highly recomend that anyone who has a chance stops by this museum for a visit. I took about 100+ pictures (they do permit non-flash photography) that I will try to get uploaded to the albums, but for now, here are the pieces mentioned above.

-Grey


Thanks for the great pics. Did you manage to get a look at the helm depicted above?
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Tue 02 May, 2006 12:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hisham Gaballa wrote:
Thanks for the great pics. Did you manage to get a look at the helm depicted above?


I did see that helm. It is in the same display as the Type XIIa sword I posted. It's pretty neat. Was there something specific you wanted to know, or a picture you wanted to see?

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Hisham Gaballa





Joined: 27 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Tue 02 May, 2006 11:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
Hisham Gaballa wrote:
Thanks for the great pics. Did you manage to get a look at the helm depicted above?


I did see that helm. It is in the same display as the Type XIIa sword I posted. It's pretty neat. Was there something specific you wanted to know, or a picture you wanted to see?

-Grey


Well, I was wondering if you had taken any photos of it. Big Grin
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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Tue 02 May, 2006 12:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I took several that did not come out, thanks to the glass. This is the only one I ended up keeping.

-Grey



 Attachment: 20.07 KB
helm.JPG


"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 02 May, 2006 5:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Is that fleur de lis cross painted or gilded directly on the helm? It doesn't look like a separate reinforcing piece.
Happy

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Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
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PostPosted: Wed 03 May, 2006 1:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It looked like paint to me. It could possibly be gilding, but I don't think so. It is definately not a seperate piece. The verticle bars over the sights, on the other hand, are separate pieces, and the bottom front plate has a extention that attaches to the top (just like the Pembroke helm).

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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