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Howard Waddell
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 2:19 pm    Post subject: Introducing... The Senlac         Reply with quote

While Peter was here, the guys came up with the idea of doing a version of the Norman, but with a straight guard and a riser on the grip. It adds a nice variation for the period, with a very classic look (and feels great!)



You can see more here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...ac-xas.htm

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
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C.L. Miller




PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 2:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ooo... I like that a LOT!
Damn.
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 2:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice looking sword Howy. I like the lines on this one, much more than the Norman.

However, I do have to point out something on the product page for this sword.

Quote:
The Battle of Hastings, fought on the 14th of October, 1066, shaped the future of Medieval England. The battle is somewhat misnamed, as it was actually fought near the current Battle Abbey (about 7 miles from Hastings) in a town already named "Battle." (The Battle of Battle may have sounded a bit too redundant.)


The town of Battle didn't exist at the time and is named so because of the sight.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Howard Waddell
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 2:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
Nice looking sword Howy. I like the lines on this one, much more than the Norman.

However, I do have to point out something on the product page for this sword.

Quote:
The Battle of Hastings, fought on the 14th of October, 1066, shaped the future of Medieval England. The battle is somewhat misnamed, as it was actually fought near the current Battle Abbey (about 7 miles from Hastings) in a town already named "Battle." (The Battle of Battle may have sounded a bit too redundant.)


The town of Battle didn't exist at the time and is named so because of the sight.


Interesting! I was told the opposite...

I'll change it!

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
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Geoff Wood




Location: UK
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 3:30 pm    Post subject: senlac         Reply with quote

That does look good. Interesting that the two guards are so different in weight.
Geoff
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M. Taylor




Location: Chesterland, Ohio
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 3:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This was obviously one of the 'surprises' that Aaron mentioned. Very nice.
"Only people not able to grow tall from their own efforts and achievements seek to subdue their fellow man."
"Only people not being able to find comfort in their own mind seek to silence others. " - Per Bylund
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 3:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice sword,

I must confess a case of "the grass is always greener," in that I also perfer this design to my Norman. Don't get me wrong though, I continue to enjoy my Norman- the first sword I received from our friends in the cheese state.

Again, a nice design Howy and everyone at albion,

Jeremy
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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 4:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

M. Taylor wrote:
This was obviously one of the 'surprises' that Aaron mentioned. Very nice.

One of them, yes. Wink

I agree with Howy - I found this to be a neat alternative/companion piece to the Norman. If I were looking right now, I'd be tossed between the Senlac and the Norman - really on the fence.

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
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Brian M




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PostPosted: Thu 01 Dec, 2005 10:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'll go against the grain and say I like the Norman better. Not that I don't like this one -- far from it -- but it's too similar in looks to the Bayeaux I'll be getting. I've wanted a Norman for a while, but since I already have the Gaddhjalt which shares the same blade, I haven't been able to justify it.
Howy, props to you for putting out the Senlac. These general types are my favorite, and it's nice to see you making something for every taste within these types.
Perhaps you will take it into consideration to make a Type-X blade with a short guard and plain "tea-cosy" pommel. These also are prominent on the Bayeaux tapestry.

Brian M
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Jeremiah Swanger




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 12:24 am    Post subject: Re: Introducing... The Senlac         Reply with quote

Howard Waddell wrote:
While Peter was here, the guys came up with the idea of doing a version of the Norman, but with a straight guard and a riser on the grip. It adds a nice variation for the period, with a very classic look (and feels great!)



You can see more here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...ac-xas.htm

Best,

Howy


Wow! Even though I consider the Norman to be the more elegant of the two, I have to admit that nothing screams "Norman" more than a straight cross and disc pommel...

Out of curiosity, how similar is the style 1 cross of the Norman to that of the Thegn? Would it be logical to conclude that a sword similar to the Norman could have been used by the Anglo-Saxons before the Norman invasion?

And, to echo the earlier sentiment of another forumite, I, too, would be very interested to see a Type X/Xa/XI/XIa with a "Tea Cosy" pommel...

"Rhaegar fought nobly.
Rhaegar fought valiantly.
Rhaegar fought honorably.
And Rhaegar died."

- G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire
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Bob Burns




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 12:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful sword, simple lines yet elegant, I especially like the way the fuller fades away at the distal taper, just looking at the pictures and reading the description via the link I can almost feel this sword. The most attractive feature about this sword to me is the fading of the fuller at the distal taper, looks to be a very fast sword.

A memorable sword, gorgeous!

Bob
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Jonathan Blair




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 3:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like it, I like it. The pommel lends itself to engraving as does the straight cross (if you are careful and use tiny letters). I haven't handled a single handed sword with a central riser before, so I'm not sure if I'd like that. If it weren't for the fact that the money I have been saving up for my first Albion is earmarked for the Crecy (only $180 left to go Big Grin ) and that I already have an example of a type Xa (Del Tin's SoSMT), I'd definitely give this one some consideration.
"Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword." - The Lord Jesus Christ, from The Gospel According to Saint Matthew, chapter x, verse 34, Authorized Version of 1611
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 5:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey guys and thanks for positive response.

This is yet a version of hilt and blade combination that is among the most classic.
It is strange how much variation you can get with small changes in these simple shapes.
It seems that nomatter how many versions of this theme that is added to the lineup, there will always be requests for the one that is not yet devloped
Wink
I have to agree that the short stubby guard (or not so short and stubby guard) + tea cosy pommel is another of these classics.
...itīs just that there are som many of them!

Difference in weight can be a result of the guard being slighly heavier on the Senlac (it is somewhat longer and less tapering at the ends). There can also be slight variations in the weight of componnts between individual swords. Even if hilt components are cast and blade blanks are CNC-machined, this does not mean all swords are identical, since there is much handwork involved. Each sword is built as an individual peice: every sword will to some degree have its own personality, even if this is a bit like comparing twins (we are talking about small variances here).
The stats presented on the page are taken from one or two swords, they are not calculated from a larger number. If the two swords that were taken for stats were on the outside of the "extremes" of light/heavy, that can result in a seeming greater difference than is actually the case.

When I first designed the Norman it was early on in the development of the NG line. The straight guard had just been used on the Gaddhjalt and was going to be used for other coming models as well. As the blade of the Norman is a shortened version of the Gaddhjalt blade it seemed a bit too much to use a straight guard on the Norman as well.
Now having a greater number of swords it is possible to explore the finer variations and so meeting at least some of the interests in sublte variations in style.
One of my hopes for the NG line was that these swords could serve the needs of demandig reenactors. By offering variations in hilt style and blade types that are contemporary it is possible for a troupe of reenactors to buy NG swords without all having the same sword.
(In some situation it might ot be detrimental for authenticity to have some duplication however: swords were issued in batches to men at arms and soldiers.)

The guard of the Thegn is not very similar to the guard of the Norman. The Thegn is shorter and wider across the blade and has rounded ends (like a drawn out lens when sen from the blade). The Thegn belongs to an earlier era, but old examples could have been handed down I guess.
We should note that examples of old blades and swords being kept in use is far fewer than up to date swords that is very contemporary to its time.
Proof for this is the Danish bog finds (this is a very different situation and tim eperiod than the high middle ages, but still) where swors were all very much of the same time period when they were deposited. No old stragglers found in later layers.
I would personally guess that old peices of armour would be more common than old swords being used by soldiers (this goes especialy for mail garments of course).

I would think that the saxons would have used pretty much the same swords as the Normans at the Battle of Hasitings. In gathered levies, one would think that old heirloom weapons are more numerous than in a dedicated invasion force. If there were very old swords present, I suspect they would have been more common on the anglo saxon side.
Just speculation, I have no proof whatsoever for this...
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John Cooksey




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 10:41 am    Post subject: Re: Introducing... The Senlac         Reply with quote

Howard Waddell wrote:
While Peter was here, the guys came up with the idea of doing a version of the Norman, but with a straight guard and a riser on the grip. It adds a nice variation for the period, with a very classic look (and feels great!)



You can see more here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...ac-xas.htm

Best,

Howy


Very nice, my new favorite (along with the Bayeaux).

What I would still like to see, though, is yet one more Viking type, a Peterson "C" or "H" with double-edged blade and one-piece pommel. :-)
Or, as others have mentioned, anything with a short, stubby guard. :-)

I didn't surrender, but they took my horse and made him surrender.
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Brian M




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 10:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Viking Type-M on the Geibig-2 (Clontarf) blade!

Brian M
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Geoff Wood




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 11:21 am    Post subject: Re: Introducing... The Senlac         Reply with quote

[quote="John Cooksey"]
Howard Waddell wrote:


What I would still like to see, though, is yet one more Viking type, a Peterson "C" or "H" with double-edged blade and one-piece pommel. :-)
Or, as others have mentioned, anything with a short, stubby guard. :-)


John
The squire viking might do it for you. Petersen H, one piece pommel, double edged, can be sharpened. We appear to have similar tastes, as it the only Albion I've got (so far).
Geoff
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John Cooksey




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 11:26 am    Post subject: Re: Introducing... The Senlac         Reply with quote

[quote="Geoff Wood"]
John Cooksey wrote:
Howard Waddell wrote:


What I would still like to see, though, is yet one more Viking type, a Peterson "C" or "H" with double-edged blade and one-piece pommel. :-)
Or, as others have mentioned, anything with a short, stubby guard. :-)


John
The squire viking might do it for you. Petersen H, one piece pommel, double edged, can be sharpened. We appear to have similar tastes, as it the only Albion I've got (so far).
Geoff


I have been thinking about that one, actually.
And about the waisted grip on the Berserkr. . . . .

I'd like to have proper edges, tho.

How do you like your SL Viking, overall?

I didn't surrender, but they took my horse and made him surrender.
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Geoff Wood




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 11:51 am    Post subject: Re: Introducing... The Senlac         Reply with quote

John Cooksey wrote:


I have been thinking about that one, actually.
And about the waisted grip on the Berserkr. . . . .

I'd like to have proper edges, tho.

How do you like your SL Viking, overall?


Well, the edges aren't, as you say, proper, in that there is an obvious bevel, but they are definitely sharp and they cut light stuff (plant material mainly) with no trouble. Overall, it is probably my favourite sword (although there are two others, an Atrim and a Lutel, that compete for the title some days). The remarks about the squire great sword in the review section apply as regards fit and finish, and you can get an idea of how the edge is sharpened from the pictures there.
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Chuck Russell




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PostPosted: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 4:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

so many swords... so little money
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