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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2005 11:32 am    Post subject: Sutton Hoo shield boss replica         Reply with quote

In the recent migration helm thread comments were made concerning Paul Mortimer's fine kit and his lack of a shield.

Well..................................................

These photos just in from Paul. This is a replica of the Sutton Hoo shield boss, as made by Dave Roper. (company name: The Hoard) The boss is shown here in a state of dry assembly. The various components will now be going off to be silver or gold plated. This is absolutely incredible work and deserves it's own thread. I can't wait to see the completed shield.




Wow


Last edited by Patrick Kelly on Mon 31 Oct, 2005 12:06 pm; edited 4 times in total
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Thomas Hoogendam




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2005 11:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

In all honousty, I'm simply speechless..... Simply stunning!!
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Jesse Frank
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Location: Tallahassee, Fl
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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2005 1:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Holy cow..... THAT is nice work Big Grin
http://jfmetalsmith.com/
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Greg Griggs




Location: Houston, TX
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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2005 1:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Didn't say anything about the kit pictured earlier because I had seen that before, but this - what can be said but....Oh My!!!!!
Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.
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C.L. Miller




PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2005 3:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

WOW. That's... that's... wow. Fantastic work.
When I told Paul he needed a shield I did so with the assumption that he had something in the works, and I assumed that whoever he had making it it would live up to the rest of his kit, but THIS... wonderful. Congratulations Paul!
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2005 12:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Fwoah! That's just so totally awesome!
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Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2005 4:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

**GASP** This literally took my breath away!
"...dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skilful, and deadly."
- Sir Toby Belch
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Joe Yurgil





Joined: 01 Jun 2004

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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2005 5:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh. My Gosh. Eek!

that is simply amaizing.


Big Grin

Sj, ar s ek fur minn.
Sj, ar s ek mur mina ok systur mina ok brur minn.
Sj, ar s ek allan minn frndgar.
Sj, kalla eim tl min.
Bija mr at taka minn sta hj eim slum Valhallar, ar drengiligr menn munu lifa allan aldr.
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Gregory J. Liebau




Location: Dinuba, CA
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2005 5:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's incredible work... I wouldn't want to imagine the price...Eek!

-Gregory-

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Chuck Russell




Location: WV
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2005 8:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

man, i so want to do a sutton hoo impression. but i like living in a house and not under a shield. that piece is a work of art.
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David Etienne




Location: Ittre, Belgium
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2005 11:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Like the others said, it's a stunning work of art !
I'm sure that the people who wore the original one were thinking the same about it, so I have one question : could someone really want to bring such a jewel to battle, or was it a symbol of (royal) power, worn only during ceremonies?

Thanks for the pictures,

David
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Chuck Russell




Location: WV
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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2005 1:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i believe he was a great king. it was prob made just for his funeral so he could have it in the after life
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2005 4:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

David Etienne wrote:
Like the others said, it's a stunning work of art !
I'm sure that the people who wore the original one were thinking the same about it, so I have one question : could someone really want to bring such a jewel to battle, or was it a symbol of (royal) power, worn only during ceremonies?

Thanks for the pictures,

David
I'm not an expert on early medieval kings, but I'd say he had those things simply because he could. He was a warrior king, so he'd dress as a king of warriors, with the best and most unique and impressive gear that he could get his hands on. At least I know I would Happy And because he'd have the equipment that only a king could have, he'd probably use it to make sure everyone instantly recognizes him as king and therefore recognize his authority. They didn't have TV or newspapers yet, so they wouldn't recognize him by just his face. If he'd be normally dressed and say "I'm your king", the average peasant would probably go "Pull the other one!". If dressed in all his gear, everyone would go "Oh f.... , it's the king!" before he'd even speak a word. I don't expect he'd be fighting like the average footsoldier though, but instead by busy commanding his troops on the battlefield.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2005 6:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I tend to think a king would use it in battle for all the reasons Jeroen said and if it got damaged beyond a few minor scratches a " RICH " king would just replace it and maybe pass it on to some loyal retainer as a prise or reward for loyalty or courage in battle.

In any case when in the middle of all that hacking and slashing you wouldn't worry about damage to your equipment until after.

The only case I would see not using a very highly decorated piece of kit would be if it wasn't a very good or sound piece of fighting equipment and purely ceremonial.

I could be wrong but depending on time and culture leading from the rear might not be an option if one expected to keep the respect of one's fellow warriors. A cowardly king or one perceived to be so might end up being a very quickly dead king.

Leading from the rear might become an option for a king already with a strong reputation for bravery, a crippled or very old but still highly respected, feared or loved king. A reputation for winning battles would help also.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Paul Mortimer




Location: England, Essex
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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2005 11:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Once again, thanks for posting the pictures, Patrick. Many thanks, too, for all the kind comments. I shall pass these on to Dave. His work is really very fine and deserves to reach a wider audience.

It's very much a work in progress. The board is made, from lime, it is lenticular and covered with leather and the boss will be mounted soon.

I think that Dave will make the metal grip and the rim next.

I think Jeroen is right about the king using the shield in battle and for the same reasons. If it got damaged - he'd have it repaired or get another; if he wasn't seriuosly rich he had no business being King.


Paul
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Brian Patrick Smith




Location: Orlando, Florida
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PostPosted: Mon 14 Nov, 2005 8:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeroen Zuiderwijk wrote:
I'm not an expert on early medieval kings, but I'd say he had those things simply because he could. He was a warrior king, so he'd dress as a king of warriors, with the best and most unique and impressive gear that he could get his hands on. At least I know I would Happy And because he'd have the equipment that only a king could have, he'd probably use it to make sure everyone instantly recognizes him as king and therefore recognize his authority. They didn't have TV or newspapers yet, so they wouldn't recognize him by just his face. If he'd be normally dressed and say "I'm your king", the average peasant would probably go "Pull the other one!". If dressed in all his gear, everyone would go "Oh f.... , it's the king!" before he'd even speak a word. I don't expect he'd be fighting like the average footsoldier though, but instead by busy commanding his troops on the battlefield.


Wassail

To my mind the Sutton Hoo hoard was a Socio-Economic statement more than anything else. Throughout most of English history East Anglia was the most financially prosperous kingdom. This makes sense when you consider the extensive ports along its shores, not to mention its prime cattle grazing. Hagen showed the economic resources in her book on Anglo Saxon foods, and how trade with Continental Europe consisted for the most part on preserved foodstuff items like cheeses, cow hides, and other by products from the cattle industry. The wealth of Sutton Hoo, the treasures of a Bretwalda, were a simple way to say to the rest of England (and Europe for that matter) "anything you can do... we can do better!" Where Vendel is in Bronze, Sutton Hoo is in Gold... a great deal of Gold!
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