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Howard Waddell
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 6:28 am    Post subject: Introducing... The Poitiers         Reply with quote

This is a sweet sword!



more here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...rs-xva.htm

Specifications
Overall length: 37.31" (94.77 cm)
Blade length: 30.625" (77.79 cm)
Blade width: 2.19" (5.56 cm)
CoG: 3.375" (8.57 cm)
CoP: 17.25" (43.82 cm)
Weight: 2 lbs 10 oz (1.19 kilos)

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com


Last edited by Howard Waddell on Mon 17 Oct, 2005 7:00 am; edited 2 times in total
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Jonathon Janusz





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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 7:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like this a lot. I was unsure about the cross from the concept drawing, but in three dimensions it really shines.

I am looking forward to the specs - this must be a very, very fast sword in hand. It looks to be a fairly dedicated thrusting sword - Peter?

Thanks again. It is great to see all of these models coming together so close together. I think some folk's Christmas lists are going to be very difficult to write this year. Happy
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Daniel Staberg




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 8:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I realy like the Poitiers no-nonsens "warrior for the working day" look which to me gives the sword an austere beauty. Despite it's apparent size (it looks as long as the Ritter to judge by the photos) the shape of the blade gives it a sleek and nimble look. I do look forward to handling this one together with a buckler.

Christmas sure is coming early for some of us this year Big Grin

Cheers
Daniel
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 8:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Poitiers is a thusting sword, yes. *But* as is the case with these XV swords, they can be very good cutters as well. They are more sensitive for the placing of the cut, but when you get a clean hit, they will cut the target with frightening ease.
Think of these swords in their setting: conflict between combattants normally wearing substantial armour of various types. The thrust is going to be the most effortless and efficient attack, but you still need a good cutting performance.
They are not rapiers, but C&T swords with an emphasis on the thrust.

It is very quick in handling.
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 8:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice! Based on the drawing, I expected it to be more like A.462 in the Wallace Collection. Looking at the original sword versus the concept, I think I had it wrong in my head. The concept sketch isn't as much like A.462 as I thought.



versus:



I like it. Happy

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 8:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:
The Poitiers is a thusting sword, yes. *But* as is the case with these XV swords, they can be very good cutters as well. They are more sensitive for the placing of the cut, but when you get a clean hit, they will cut the target with frightening ease.


I found this to be precisely the case with the Mercenary. It will be interesting to see what a single-handed blade of this type is all about... looking forward to it.



Oh, and this makes what, 4 new Albion Next Gens in about a week? Well done - know these have been in the works for a good while.

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
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Thomas Hoogendam




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 8:42 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Would you take a look at that tip?? Scary....... Eek!

This really has the look of a fighting sword, the one you would expect on the battlefield. Great work Albion!!!
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 8:43 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
Nice! Based on the drawing, I expected it to be more like A.462 in the Wallace Collection. Looking at the original sword versus the concept, I think I had it wrong in my head. The concept sketch isn't as much like A.462 as I thought.

I like it. Happy


You were not wrong: the A.462 in the Wallace Collection is the main inspiration for the Poitiers. It is not intended to be a copy, though. The sword from the wallace colection together with another wellknown sword in the collection of the Museum of London (on page 132 in "Records": the XV.6 found at the foundations of Westminster bridge in 1742) are the two swords that have had the most influence on the design.


Last edited by Peter Johnsson on Sat 15 Oct, 2005 2:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Michael F.




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 9:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow! Great work! I wasn't too fond of the concept drawing but seeing it in steel now...I'm blown away. I love that guard... The XV's are coming in very nicely, and man, would I hate to be on the recieving end of one of those. Eek!
"Tis but a scratch.....A scratch? your arm's off!"-- Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
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Gary Grzybek




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 9:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's a real nice blade Big Grin

I'm crossing my fingers that you guys do a version with a scent stopper pommel Cool

Gary Grzybek
ARMA Northern N.J.
www.armastudy.org
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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 11:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice and matter of fact in appearance.
"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
-Marcus Aurelius

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 12:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that a lot and I didn't think I would. I love the shape and proportion of the pommel in relation to the rest of the sword.
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 2:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Daniel Staberg wrote:
I realy like the Poitiers no-nonsens "warrior for the working day" look which to me gives the sword an austere beauty. Despite it's apparent size (it looks as long as the Ritter to judge by the photos) the shape of the blade gives it a sleek and nimble look. I do look forward to handling this one together with a buckler.

Christmas sure is coming early for some of us this year Big Grin

Cheers
Daniel


Hej Daniel,

If I were doing a reenactment of a 14th C archer, this would be the sword IŽd carry as sidearm together with a nice buckler. The blade is not quite as long as the Ritter, but it still has good reach.
I do not have the final data here with me, so I cannot quote the stats. Sorry about that.

It is a sword with some mass, but you do not feel it when you wield the sword. Most of the mass is concentrated close to the hilt. This puts the blade node a fair bit toward he hilt as well, but it is according to the type. You will want to cut more towards the middle part of the blade anyway as the point section is fairly narrow.

This sword would come to its own in frantic melee or a duel with bucklers.
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Jason Dingledine
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Oct, 2005 2:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey Guys,

I'll be getting the stats for this one to Howy first thing Monday morning. The grip was still slightly wet at the end of the day on Friday, so I wasn't able to handle this sword much, so there were no stats taken. I'm sure Howy will post them as soon as I'm finished.

This is a mean little sword though, I was up in the air about it (not really into single hand swords too much), but this one is nasty. Happy

Jason Dingledine
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Steve Grisetti




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Oct, 2005 5:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

An important stat from the Albion site: "This sword is offered in a limited edition of only 100 collectible swords worldwide."
A Very limited edition! I wonder why so few?
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Edward Hitchens




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Oct, 2005 7:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Poitiers came out very nice! Almost makes me wish I hadn't changed my order to a Fiore. I echo Steve's question on why only 100 are being made. Question

Ted

"The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest." Thomas Jefferson
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Roger Hooper




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Oct, 2005 10:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Steve Grisetti wrote:
An important stat from the Albion site: "This sword is offered in a limited edition of only 100 collectible swords worldwide."
A Very limited edition! I wonder why so few?


There are a number of models with a limited edition of 100 - among them the Reeve, the Bayeaux, and the Kern..

That is another great looking sword from Albion. I'm very interested to see the specs. XV's are often bigger and heavier than you think they would be.

Peter's thought of the Poitiers as an Archer's sidearm - didn't English archers wear their swords pushed around to the back, resulting in the French story that Englishmen had tails?
Or did I dream that? Confused

If it's true, maybe the Poitier could be nicknamed (with apologies to Bernard Cornwell) the Archer's Tail.
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Daniel Staberg




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Oct, 2005 11:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roger Hooper wrote:


Peter's thought of the Poitiers as an Archer's sidearm - didn't English archers wear their swords pushed around to the back, resulting in the French story that Englishmen had tails?
Or did I dream that? Confused

If it's true, maybe the Poitier could be nicknamed (with apologies to Bernard Cornwell) the Archer's Tail.


Roger,
The probable origin of the story that the English had tails were the Welsh archers and spearmen who were armed with "great knives" (grand coutilles) which were worn pushed through the belt at the back when not in use. The Welsh being mostly poor at the time seems not to have been able to afoard neither proper sheats for their 'knives' nor proper swords in the early parts of the 100-Years war.
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Daniel Staberg




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Oct, 2005 11:42 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:

Hej Daniel,

If I were doing a reenactment of a 14th C archer, this would be the sword IŽd carry as sidearm together with a nice buckler. The blade is not quite as long as the Ritter, but it still has good reach.
I do not have the final data here with me, so I cannot quote the stats. Sorry about that.

It is a sword with some mass, but you do not feel it when you wield the sword. Most of the mass is concentrated close to the hilt. This puts the blade node a fair bit toward he hilt as well, but it is according to the type. You will want to cut more towards the middle part of the blade anyway as the point section is fairly narrow.

This sword would come to its own in frantic melee or a duel with bucklers.


Hej Peter,

My Poitiers will eventually end up as part of 14th C portrayal together with my buckler though I'm aiming at portraying a lesser men-at-arms of the infamous Free Companies rather than a archer. (Pre-gunpowder missile weapons and me have simply agreed to disagree since I can just barely hit the broad side of barn Laughing Out Loud ) It'll go well together with a bascinet and a padded jupon de wambeson as well a shortened lance to start with. Then I can add items such as gauntlets and leg harness when and if I can afford them.

Thank you for the description of how the sword will handle, since the only 'real' swords I've handled are 17th C and 18th C military swords I'm quite curious about how a a re-created medieval blade will handle and feel when I've got the sword in hand. For me the Poitiers and Agincourt are both part of a great learning experience, reading about how medieval swords handled is one thing, discovering it through personal use and practice quite another.

Cheers
Daniel
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Alexander Hinman




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PostPosted: Sun 16 Oct, 2005 2:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I love the look of this sword, and am glad that Albion has not forgotten the cut, even if it is an XV. I look forward to purchasing it, provided they all aren't snapped up before I can get my hands on it.
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