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Leo Todeschini
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Location: Oxford, UK
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Dec, 2020 7:33 am    Post subject: We made THE WITCHER swords         Reply with quote

Hi All,

some of you may know that as well as high end reproduction pieces, I also make film props and I was lucky enough to make a whole load of the pieces for Witcher Season 1 and am now on 2 and Nick the Head of Armoury on Witcher thought it would be fun to make a film about the props.....so here we are and I hope you enjoy it.

https://youtu.be/kVeUQnlXYFw

"Witcher by Netflix, starring Henry Cavill was a stand out series for 2019/20. Nick Jeffries as HOD of the Armoury Department / Weapons Designer and myself, as maker of many of the hero props, are two guys heavily involved in the show, and in this film, we have a ‘show and tell’ about Geralt’s weapons.

As we both have an intimate knowledge of the thinking, design and manufacture of the weapons, we know more about these pieces than anyone, and here we share our thoughts over a table full of original props.

With many thanks to Netflix for allowing us to make and share this video. https://www.netflix.com

Henry Cavill explains about the Witcher swords in this official Netflix video here https://youtu.be/HnvSLMbctL4

Henry Cavill breaks down the Blaviken fight scene and discusses visual effects in this official Netflix video here https://youtu.be/fqlUWWg6aYo"
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www.todsworkshop.com
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Chad Arnow
myArmoury Team


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PostPosted: Tue 01 Dec, 2020 8:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tod,
I watched this video earlier. It was a really nice insight into what armorers do for film work. Nicely done!

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Dec, 2020 12:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tod, thanks for this.

As a lover of swords and cinema both, I find these insights fascinating.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Greyson Brown




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PostPosted: Tue 01 Dec, 2020 7:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I also watched this earlier and appreciated the comments and insights. In particular, I liked that the way your chain was made allowed for it to be "broken" without having to also have a second broken version. I also really liked that your TCP64 Brass Folding Knife (not discussed in your video) starred in a scene as well. I guess the fact that you didn't have to modify a medieval piece made the rest of the items that much more believable to me some how.

Now if only you had been in charge of continuity as well... Having Geralt's sword change just because he turned to face the other direction in a hallway was a bit jarring. Eek!

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Michael Beeching




PostPosted: Mon 07 Dec, 2020 7:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dear Tod,

As far as fantasy swords go, I really enjoyed taking a look at these, even though I don't stand much of a chance to see the actual show. Although many of the aspects of the various weapons might look fanciful to some, I have seen all of of the individual components in either historical or reproduction weapons. I particularly enjoyed the Silver Sword - it happens to look much bigger than it really is in the YouTube thumbnail, by the way!

Concerning the Sliver Sword in particular, the "extendo-tang" ricasso is very interesting. However, it isn't necessarily ahistorical, either. For instance, this is a reproduction by Dr. Fabrice Cognot demonstrates something very similar in concept:

https://www.historicalbladesmith.com/post/178269848513/a-burgundian-arming-sword-late-xvth-century

...On another forum, I began a discussion of why one might design and produce such a weapon. Reasons range from "just because it looks cool" to a secondary control point (not unlike later very large two-handed swords). It allows for easy fingering of the blade without cutting the index finger, and allows binding in that area without damaging the blade. It probably also makes fitting the crossguard a lot easier, too! It is unconventional, but not unworkable, though in the case of the Silver Sword, it strikes me as more of an aesthetic choice.

I really like the scent-stopper pommel on the Silver Sword as well, though I have to say, it should have been rotated 90 degrees for comfort! Hex pommels are wonderfully ergonomic, though orientation is key in that regard!

Last, the tip of the sword is very interesting as well. Ric Furrer showed me a picture of what I believe to have been a Hungarian cavalry sword in one of his books. I want to say it was postulated that the tip was modified to look as it did, but if you have a cutting weapon, it's not inherently bad design-wise. In any sense, that sword had a tip much like the Silver and Meteorite swords, with a "chevron point," if you will. In fact, if you care to do a test, I would be interested to see how well a chevron point does at penetration vs. a spatulate point against textile armor! As per other historical reproductions, the chevron point is also very prominent on Neil Burridge's Hallstatt C Mindelheim sword.

...That said, if you tweaked the proportions of the Silver Sword just a little, I think you'd have a very compelling weapon indeed!
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Tue 08 Dec, 2020 5:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes Leo/Tod, I watched the video and I have your site BOOKMARKED on my MAC and I regularly check on it for more of your interesting content of experimental archeology testing of all sorts of things.

Insight into how real and prop sword are made for movies including the " Hero Swords " which I assume are real swords but probably unsharpened plus the other stand in swords from aluminum to rigid rubber to more floppy hit friendly to the actors rubber swords graded in what damage they can do depending on the scene and the experience of the actors or stunt people using the prop swords if they "Mess Up" a fight choreography.

Depending on the exclusive rights to the designs which may now be owned by the production company of the movie, making fully functional and sharp limited editions of these swords might be commercially interesting ?

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Greyson Brown




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PostPosted: Wed 09 Dec, 2020 8:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I forgot to mention that I enjoyed seeing the partial swords used for scenarios where a CGI blade is needed. I'm also really glad that technology has advanced. The first time I am aware of that being used was in First Knight (back in 1995 when I was just barely a teenager), and it was way more obvious than it is these days (you can see the clip here).
"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
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Edward Lee




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PostPosted: Wed 09 Dec, 2020 6:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There was a scene where this wizard was killed by Tod's Holbein dagger, quite memorable.
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