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Lance K.




PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:19 pm    Post subject: Sword wax         Reply with quote

I have heard of Renaissance wax as an effective way of preventing rust, but are other waxes effective as well? Like carnuba wax?

I've just never seen Renaissance wax anywhere so I'm wondering if anyone has expericne with any other kind.

If renaissance wax is the way to go, maybe a better question is... Are there any local stores that carry it, or must it be ordered?

Thanks,
Lance
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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I just use machine oil or sword oil. I use it often, since I use my swords often.

I haven't ever used wax, but know Renaissance wax is used a lot in the antique world. It's possible you might be able to locate it that way. Also, it is regularly available on ebay, though prices can vary wildly. I'm sure it can be ordered online, and again, I would suggest doing some price shopping. Keep in mind shipping costs when you make the comparison.

Hopefully, others will have more info for you. Sorry I couldn't be more help... Worried

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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just about any kind of wax should work fine. However, I gave up using it years ago since I found it to be more trouble than it was worth. It's fine for swords that are going to be hung on the wall and admired, but it doesn't last long on swords that are handled often as most of mine are. It's more of a hassle to reapply wax than it is to simply wipe the sword down with an oily rag before you put it away. This is one of those instances where the modern "quick fix" isn't worth the effort, IMHO.
"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

One reason I like the Renaissance Wax so much is exactly for the reasons that Patrick mention: because other waxes are so difficult as to be barely worth the effort. Ren Wax nearly disappears when you put it on your item. It goes on so thin and hardens completely clear that it leaves nearly no trace behind. More than that, the application is painless. One simply uses a clean cloth and rubs it in. There's no worry if it's been applied completely evenly, too thick, too thin: it always works out just fine in the end. It's a very good product and I'd encourage its use. Even if you could find it locally, it's bound to be cheaper on the 'net and that's probably your best bet of getting a tub of it.
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G. Scott H.




Location: Arizona, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick makes a good point, but if you DO decide to go the Ren Wax route, shop around! It is available from both MRL and By The Sword, but can be found much cheaper on several online woodcraft stores. MRL is $29 for 200ml / 7 oz. BTS is $28 for the same size. The online woodcrafts shops ususally sell the same amount for around $20. Eek! WTF?! I just use an old gun cleaning rag I have that is soaked with a combo of Hoppe's #9, 3-in-1 oil, and several others. Laughing Out Loud It works great. Happy
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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I use 3 in1, gun oil, and even some old McGuires auto wax.

All seem to work fine depending on what I'm trying to accomplish.

based on Nathan's feedbakc, perhaps I'll try some Ren wax when its resupply time.

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Lance K.




PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah I don't plan to cut with it, or handle it too often, its more symbolical and will be on the wall mostly. I'll probably start with wax and see how it goes. Seems to me I should be able to handle it a bit without much trouble, plus it would be nice to not have to wash my hands after admiring it. Big Grin

Lance
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 8:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lance Karsten wrote:
Yeah I don't plan to cut with it, or handle it too often, its more symbolical and will be on the wall mostly. I'll probably start with wax and see how it goes. Seems to me I should be able to handle it a bit without much trouble, plus it would be nice to not have to wash my hands after admiring it. Big Grin

Lance


That's a good example of when the Ren Wax is an appropriate choice. Once it's been applied and is completely hardened/dried, there really is no way to tell it's been waxed. Handling it leaves no residue or trace on your hands.

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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 9:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

G.Scott H. wrote:
I just use an old gun cleaning rag I have that is soaked with a combo of Hoppe's #9, 3-in-1 oil, and several others. It works great.


I use an old red shop rag that has who knows who many different types of oil soaked into it. The only time I came close to divorcing my wife was when she decided to wash it. Eek!

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G. Scott H.




Location: Arizona, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 10:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
G.Scott H. wrote:
I just use an old gun cleaning rag I have that is soaked with a combo of Hoppe's #9, 3-in-1 oil, and several others. It works great.


I use an old red shop rag that has who knows who many different types of oil soaked into it. The only time I came close to divorcing my wife was when she decided to wash it. Eek!


Oh, my GAWD! Eek! It can take years to get a gun/knife/sword cleaning rag properly "seasoned"! You've got to get just the right blend of Hoppe's, CLP, 3-in-1, etc. The one I am currently using has been soaking up various solvents and oils for about 4 years now; it's almost like an old friend. Definitely grounds for divorce! Eek! Laughing Out Loud Happy
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 10:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

On another topic thread a while back car wax was mentioned as possible rust protection.

At the moment I'm thinking of using car wax to protect the inside of my armour from sweat and humidity when wearing it. Will this work if applied lightly before putting on the armour and maybe using breakfree to wipe down after use ?

Any down side to car wax ? Any other waxes ? ( Not counting the previously mentioned Renaissance wax. Just looking for something easy to find.)

For swords an old gun cloth soaked in breakfree and a variety of gun oils seems to have worked well.

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 10:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Why not just paint the inside of your armour or let it patinate in a controlled manner?
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 10:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes painting could be a solution, but could you define the " patinate in a controled manner ": I assume that this is not just accumulating active red rust ? ( Excuse my ignorance here, it does seem better than worrying about the rust if the patination creates a protective coating. )

Also I will be learning something new to me Big Grin

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G. Scott H.




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PostPosted: Wed 13 Apr, 2005 11:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Yes painting could be a solution, but could you define the " patinate in a controled manner ": I assume that this is not just accumulating active red rust ? ( Excuse my ignorance here, it does seem better than worrying about the rust if the patination creates a protective coating. )

Also I will be learning something new to me Big Grin
Well, I'm no expert in this area either, but I will say that I've had some experience with this on the locks and barrels of my muzzleloading guns (which are left "in the white" or unfinished. The idea is that you simply wipe down the metal surface after use and it will eventually begin to darken as a thin layer of oxidation develops. You certainly don't want to allow outright rust to run rampant! Eek! If you find any spots of actual red rust, steel wool them off as soon as possible and wipe the surface with an oily rag. This is how I would define "controlled patination." In other words, if you don't wax or paint the steel, but just wipe it down with a somewhat oily cloth after each handling/use, it will eventually patina, which does provide a somewhat protective film. In essence, gun bluing or browning is just an expedited version of this process. Happy
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Aaron Schnatterly




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PostPosted: Thu 14 Apr, 2005 5:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
At the moment I'm thinking of using car wax to protect the inside of my armour from sweat and humidity when wearing it. Will this work if applied lightly before putting on the armour and maybe using breakfree to wipe down after use ?

Any down side to car wax ? Any other waxes ? ( Not counting the previously mentioned Renaissance wax. Just looking for something easy to find.)


I'd also be concerned about the outside. It's made of the same stuff, after all. Razz As long as you are using clear car wax, there isn't much need to wipe it off with breakfree... leave it on. Also, the stuff gets brittle when dry, so it will eventually crack and flake, requiring somewhat frequent reapplication. I've heard that clear shoe polish works better, since it remains a bit flexible, though have not tried it myself.

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Thu 14 Apr, 2005 10:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

G. Scott H. explained it well: using a wire brush or steel wool to remove any active reddish rust (when there is any) and wiping it down without polishing will result in an even-forming layer of protective patina.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 14 Apr, 2005 3:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Nathan, seems like a good option. ( Good info in any case. )

Might look into the clear shoe wax also for this or other applications.

Once a good level of patination is achieved I guess waxing then might be an option. ( Maybe an un-needed option. Wink )

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Lance K.




PostPosted: Thu 14 Apr, 2005 4:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I found Renaissance wax for $20 at this site, though shipping is $6. But it was $38 at another site.

http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/index.as...rodID=1304

Lance
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Nathan Cole




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PostPosted: Fri 15 Apr, 2005 5:10 am    Post subject: butcher's wax?         Reply with quote

Is butcher's wax the same thing or a vastly inferior wax for sword/armour protection?

Nathan
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Fri 15 Apr, 2005 1:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lance;

Thanks for the site info for the renaissance wax: Have put it my favorites list and will look into it later.

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