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Karl Akkerman




Location: Michigan
Joined: 12 Aug 2010

Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jan, 2019 12:17 pm    Post subject: Carnuestie sword by Neil Burridge. My first sharp sword.         Reply with quote

Just thought I would share with everyone the first sword I have bought with a sharp edge. It is a bronze Carnuestie sword by Neil Burridge which is a variation upon the Ewart Park type, this one with a tin pommel. It is based upon an archaeological find at Carnuestie made on September 9th, 2016.

Here is the link to the gallery for this Carnuostie sword on Neil Burridge's facebook page.

The nine photos below are ones that I took the day that I received the sword.

















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Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 4
Posts: 4,169

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jan, 2019 2:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful, as are all Neil Burridge's swords. I'm curious - With most bronze age swords, the wooden pommel ensures that the balance is a ways down the blade. What does that bronze (tin?) pommel cap do to the balance?
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Karl Akkerman




Location: Michigan
Joined: 12 Aug 2010

Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jan, 2019 3:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roger Hooper wrote:
Beautiful, as are all Neil Burridge's swords. I'm curious - With most bronze age swords, the wooden pommel ensures that the balance is a ways down the blade. What does that bronze (tin?) pommel cap do to the balance?


The pommel on this specific sword is tin which matches the archaeological find.

As I have never used one with a wooden pommel I am not sure how its balance would compare. In my hand it feels quite fast but when extended point forward I can still feel a sense the mass towards the point and when I swing it there is still a definite feeling of momentum being generated.

The point of balance is about one finger width in front of the blade's narrowest point in the wasp waist section of the blade.
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Aaron Hoard




Location: Seattle, WA
Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 157

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jan, 2019 4:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful - can't go wrong with Neil's work.
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 3,334

PostPosted: Tue 08 Jan, 2019 11:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is a beauty to pick as your first sharp sword. Welcome to the Bronze Age.
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen and Sword Books
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Likes: 32 pages

Posts: 748

PostPosted: Wed 09 Jan, 2019 6:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The first european sword I ordered was an Ewart Park by Neil and it is one of my favorites. Congratulations, you sure started out at a high level. That is a beauty.
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T Franks




Location: Chicagoland Suburbs, Illinois
Joined: 20 Jul 2010
Likes: 12 pages
Reading list: 2 books

Posts: 92

PostPosted: Sun 13 Jan, 2019 10:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice. I like his Mindlehiem too. Well, all his work really. Congrats on the acquisition.
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Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Thu 17 Jan, 2019 6:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Roger Hooper wrote:
... the wooden pommel...


In my research, I found that most bronze-age pommels were ivory or minerals, not wood.

Nowadays, it's difficult (and costly) to find a piece of ivory large enough for a pommel. There is a faux ivory available, but I think it is too light to make an effective pommel.

You can use agate or marble instead.

Firesteel Designs
Hand-crafted good lovingly infused with hemoglobin
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 3,334

PostPosted: Fri 18 Jan, 2019 12:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wood is fine. There are plenty of examples with wooden pommels.
Author: Bronze Age Military Equipment, Pen and Sword Books
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