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Joel Lombard





Joined: 11 Jul 2018

Posts: 42

PostPosted: Sat 18 Aug, 2018 11:40 am    Post subject: How rusty can you get?         Reply with quote

Hi i wonder if how picky they are with rusty equipment?


I did the citrus and salt it was high carbon and whent fast rusty?
It just surface!

I like rusty look more than shiny silver!

Do they pass rusty equipment?



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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Aug, 2018 12:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, it depends - who are "they"? Happy
The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Michael P. Smith




Location: Muncie, Indiana
Joined: 11 Jul 2018
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Aug, 2018 1:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If I understand what you're asking... then, pretty rusty.

In some periods a "russet" finish was used on armor and, I think, some sword hilt furniture.

It's basically a technique where the the metal is allowed to develop a thin, even patina of rust, and then the rusting process is arrested. The rest is an even oxidized layer that offers some protection against further rusting. I'm not an expert in the technique, but I've seen it done.
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Tom King




Location: florida
Joined: 11 Sep 2009
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PostPosted: Sun 19 Aug, 2018 1:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A russet/oil finish was a late 16th century to 17th century manner of finishing munitions armor, where linseed oil was spread over the piece of armor and then it was subjected to enough heat to give it a mottled brownish finish but not ruin the the temper of the piece.

even stabilized brown rust is still slowly eating away at the metal and if you were an aglocentric definition of a knight or professional man at arms you'd have someone to keep your armor in good standing.

http://medieval.ucdavis.edu/120D/Money.html
is a good reference for what the prices of medieval armor was over a ~400 year period in england and france compared to other goods and wages. It'd be like letting a midline luxury car rust out via not maintaining it.
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 1,008

PostPosted: Sun 19 Aug, 2018 1:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It seems to have been especially popular on Japanese armour. For example:


The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Joel Lombard





Joined: 11 Jul 2018

Posts: 42

PostPosted: Sun 19 Aug, 2018 3:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh thanks all for reply didn't dare to have rusty equintment. I sanded it of it get to fast rusty!
Dont want to risk it realy Eek!

It going to fast down.
think it would get very rusty when the vikings sailed overseas.
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
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PostPosted: Sun 19 Aug, 2018 4:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Regular polishing and oiling stops rust from forming, and smooth polished surfaces are slower to rust, to begin with. Or you can plate the steel with silver or gold, or paint it. Or just stow your armor safely, wrapped in oiled or waxed cloth, instead of wearing it while sailing. Happy
The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
Joined: 17 Sep 2003

Posts: 1,353

PostPosted: Sun 19 Aug, 2018 6:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joel Lombard wrote:

think it would get very rusty when the vikings sailed overseas.


Certainly not. Armor and weapons were not only expensive but highly prized status symbols. They'd be very well cared for and protected from the elements when not in use.

Matthew
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Joel Lombard





Joined: 11 Jul 2018

Posts: 42

PostPosted: Wed 22 Aug, 2018 9:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matthew Amt wrote:
Joel Lombard wrote:

think it would get very rusty when the vikings sailed overseas.


Certainly not. Armor and weapons were not only expensive but highly prized status symbols. They'd be very well cared for and protected from the elements when not in use.

Matthew


Oh thanks is bad in reenactment there always shiny and new clothes. Don't think everyone would have shiny and polished equipment. And now every one have swords and a helmet:/
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 1,008

PostPosted: Wed 22 Aug, 2018 9:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joel Lombard wrote:
Matthew Amt wrote:
Joel Lombard wrote:

think it would get very rusty when the vikings sailed overseas.


Certainly not. Armor and weapons were not only expensive but highly prized status symbols. They'd be very well cared for and protected from the elements when not in use.

Matthew


Oh thanks is bad in reenactment there always shiny and new clothes. Don't think everyone would have shiny and polished equipment. And now every one have swords and a helmet:/

Actually, having a helmet should be one of the top priorities, right after having a shield. It's the very first and most important piece of armour any period warrior could have.

Spears should be almost as ubiquitous as shields, of course, but depending on the exact period and region, swords were not exactly rare, either, especially for successful raiders. Plus they're cool! Happy

And because weapons and armour were so expensive and so important, they were taken good care of, so they should be some degree of shiny - not necessarily mirror polished, but if you keep regularly cleaning and oiling a piece of steel, in order to keep it from rusting, it will be quite shiny indeed. Unless you paint it, cover it in fabric, blue/brown it or do something else to protect it from the elements, but those are all more expensive and more high-maintenance solutions than simple elbow grease now and then.

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings


Last edited by Mikko Kuusirati on Wed 22 Aug, 2018 1:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
Joined: 17 Sep 2003

Posts: 1,353

PostPosted: Wed 22 Aug, 2018 10:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joel Lombard wrote:
Matthew Amt wrote:
Joel Lombard wrote:

think it would get very rusty when the vikings sailed overseas.


Certainly not. Armor and weapons were not only expensive but highly prized status symbols. They'd be very well cared for and protected from the elements when not in use.

Matthew


Oh thanks is bad in reenactment there always shiny and new clothes. Don't think everyone would have shiny and polished equipment. And now every one have swords and a helmet:/


It's very true that reenactors are a LOT better equipped on average than the typical medieval army they portray! Far more helmets, armor, and swords than you'd see back then. That's partly just the nature of the hobby--we LIKE our toys!--though some of it is because of safety rules.

But if you DID have a sword and/or helmet back then, you would take care of it. And if you only had one suit of clothing, you would take care of that, too, and keep it as clean and patched as possible. But even then it is not likely to last more than a year, being worn every day, if that long. So you would have new clothes each year or more often. Most reenactors I know have been wearing the same clothes for years or decades! It is far from "shiny new", even if it isn't grubby or stinky or ragged.

Matthew
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