Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > British Regimental Broadswords Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Ralph Grinly





Joined: 19 Jan 2011

Posts: 305

PostPosted: Sat 21 Oct, 2017 1:06 pm    Post subject: British Regimental Broadswords         Reply with quote

I have a question for our knowledgeable members. With regard to 19 c British Regimental broadswords ( aka Scottish Claymores) I notice the majority of them were fitted with linings in the baskets and often "fluffy bits" around the pommels. Did these adornments serve any USEFUL / PRACTICAL purposes or were they purely bits of Victorian decorative tat ? I'd have thought that such linings..if left on swords in typical British weather would have quickly gotten wet and sodden, contributing greatly to increased corrosion on the inside of the basket hilts ?
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 2,223

PostPosted: Sun 22 Oct, 2017 12:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As far as I know, the basket liner was 'supposed to' prevent the basket's interior from chafing the hand. The pommel tassel...pure decoration in my eye. I have a Scottish basket-hilted broadsword that came with both. I removed them, and can tell no difference, aside from looking less 'gaudy'. Maybe it's just me, but I prefer an open basket. Wink ....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 2,223

PostPosted: Sun 22 Oct, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is the way I roll....Scotty-style. Wink .....McM


 Attachment: 33.05 KB
WIN_20171022_17_23_39_Pro.jpg


''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
View user's profile Send private message
Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,200

PostPosted: Mon 23 Oct, 2017 6:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As Mark said, the liner was supposed to help protect the hand. They were usually made of leather and covered in red cloth. Tartan was never used to line basket hilts although at Highland Games you are likely to see many people carrying swords with tartan liners. I suspect the cloth and leather liners were treated to help preserve them in a damp climate. The insides of the basket hilt were, at least initially, coated with tar or a similar substance to help guard against corrosion.

Full basket hilt liners were rare in pre-Culloden basket hilts and most of the antique swords you see with them were equipped with one at some later time. The tassels, remnants of which have been found on the older swords, apparently were decorative. Hard to see any real use for it.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
View user's profile Send private message
Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 107

PostPosted: Mon 23 Oct, 2017 8:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lin Robinson wrote:
Full basket hilt liners were rare in pre-Culloden basket hilts and most of the antique swords you see with them were equipped with one at some later time.

By "full basket hilt liners" do you mean liners for full baskets or full liners for baskets?

One of my books has a photo of an old ribbon hilt with what could be the rotted remnant of a liner. If that's what it is, it's located toward the blade end of the basket.
View user's profile Send private message
Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,200

PostPosted: Mon 23 Oct, 2017 11:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan...

I am referring to basket hilts with liners covering the entire inside of the basket. Sorry, I now see that my comment was unclear.

The liner was usually a partial one, of course, and sometimes nothing more than a leather pad at the front of the where the tang entered the basket.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > British Regimental Broadswords
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum