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Maciej K.
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PostPosted: Mon 15 May, 2017 11:30 am    Post subject: Musee des Invalides sword, scabbard and belting         Reply with quote

I have for sale one of my recently finished works: 14th century sword based on original sword from Musée de l'Armée in Paris, France. Museum description: 'Sword no. J PO 2233, Western Europe, first half of the XIVth century'.
Second known pommel of this rare type is on the sword in Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Downing College, Cambridge, England - mentioned in 'Record of the Medieval Swords' by Ewart Oakeshott (p. 228).
All measurements are same or very close to the original sword except the weight which originally is close to 1kg, probably beacuse of the partially hollow pommel and lack of the grip. There are also losses caused by local corrosion and that may have influence on current weight.
Some points about handling: it is nice with that pommel and wide blade, provides smooth and well controlled cutting, good speed and accuracy. It would be also a very good weapon for thrusting as well, because of good stiffness and spiky tip.
That would be a nice battle sword in my opinion, especially for a short distance.

Measurements:
total length 870mm
blade width 65mm
grip 99mm
balance ca. 90mm
weight ca. 1250g













[imghttp://artofswordmaking.com/public/photos/original/paris_sword_07-1494867438.jpg[/img]




More informations: http://artofswordmaking.com/gallery/western-e...arly-14thc

Medieval Swords - www.artofswordmaking.com


Last edited by Maciej K. on Wed 17 May, 2017 6:03 am; edited 1 time in total
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Kai Lawson




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PostPosted: Mon 15 May, 2017 8:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I really like both the original sword and the reproduction, especially the pommel. Including a good photo of the original is an appreciated touch.
"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
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Mark Moore




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PostPosted: Mon 15 May, 2017 9:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, you nailed that one. Big Grin I doubt the original's owner would be able to tell the difference. Bravo!....McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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T. Diamante




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PostPosted: Tue 16 May, 2017 8:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The different animals in place of flowers in the tooling is a pleasant departure from the usual, and very well done.
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Brian M.




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PostPosted: Tue 16 May, 2017 11:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Something about this sword really speaks to me. The fuller, the pommel, the proportions.

I already admire your work based on the Xa you did for JD, and the couple Dave Rawlings has reviewed (Naumburg sword and reverse-edge falchion). But this is the first where if I had the means in my sword budget I would have already given you a call.

If someone here picks this up I hope they will do an informal review.

Would we call this a XIV? Blade length, width at base, profile taper, fuller and lenticular section all seem to check out. But if it is I think it's the only one I've seen without a downswept guard.
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Phil D.




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PostPosted: Tue 16 May, 2017 11:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey Maciej ,
This is an amazing piece.

You mentioned that the original had a hollow/semi hollow pommel.Is it difficult to cast hollow/semi hollow pommels...I am just curious as to why we don't see allot of swords actually replicated with hollow pommels.

Ans I think that I just used up my quota for the word "hollow" in one sitting!!

"A bottle of wine contains more philosophy than all the books in the world." -- Louis Pasteur

"A gentleman should never leave the house without a sharp knife, a good watch, and great hat."
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Tue 16 May, 2017 12:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Brian M. wrote:
Something about this sword really speaks to me. The fuller, the pommel, the proportions.


Right there with you, Brian. I really like the original and I like this reproduction just as much. Whatever it is about the antique that grabs me has been re-captured in this new piece.

Nicely done.

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Maciej K.
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PostPosted: Tue 16 May, 2017 3:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you guys. I appreciate this kind of comments - I mean capturing the character of the original sword. It was in fact my goal. Also that why I have decided to shape whole pommel by hand grinding only looking at the original with all it`s imperfections of the geometry and surface nuances. possibly this can be a reason why it has the same character as the original pommel.
I was mention above that there is a second one like that - I have found a third one - but not as a real sword part, but depicted on the altar sculpture in Germany (Meinzer Dom, circa 1250). It is almost perfectly detailed and it is the same type / shape as those real two.
back to the sword - is this Type XIV? I would risk a claim that it can be a perfect example of Type XIV looking at Oakeshott original sketches and it`s proportions - however - it can be also included in Type XIII or even XVI group...

I really like the comparision with the second one recreated by me, falchion from the same museum in Paris - and they both are placed very close in museum wall - you can see it here: http://artofswordmaking.com/public/photos/ori...166809.jpg

Medieval Swords - www.artofswordmaking.com
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Maciej K.
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PostPosted: Wed 17 May, 2017 6:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The sword has been sold yesterday. Thank you all for big interest and appreciation.

One more thing about the hollow pommel - at this case I`m not really sure about that... First tip I can see on original sword is a bit wider whole at the bottom side of the pommel. Second tip is a very small weight of the sword. But still - there are no radiograph research available to confirm this theory Happy
Many earlier pommels - found separetad - is partially hollow. How they were casted? I think similar to other small casts with copper-alloy. I mean simple stone or ceramic forms with two pieces. We know there could be some gas bubbles inside and that why they can be hollow - more or less intentionally.
Well - the only thing I did to be even closer to original - I have made some similar size whole at the pommel`s bottom.
I have also used some harder material - not pure brass, which is softer than steel - but some copper alloy almost same hardness as steel - which can be closer to that one used then for pommels.

Medieval Swords - www.artofswordmaking.com
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Guillaume Vauthier




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PostPosted: Wed 17 May, 2017 9:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm glad that you finally sold this piece, it is extremely impressive!
In fact, I was the one that originally ordered this piece to Maciej - as a set with the falchion. But you know, as time goes by, other projects seem finally more relevant. That said, if I was rich, I can assure you all that this pretty small monster would be mine right now. Big Grin

I decided anyway to keep on with the falchion, and with another project currently in progress... and if I believe Maciej, it will be an extremely, extremely nice weapon... can't wait for this!

And if the buyer is actually from here, if he wants to give us his feelings about it, I would be very pleased!

(In fact I have the secret hope to finally succeed in manipulating the original sword at the Invalides... it would be so great!)
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Maciej K.
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PostPosted: Wed 17 May, 2017 11:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thanks for your comment Guillaume. Actually it is also your merit that this sword was created - thanks to your data from museum. I hope I will make a video about this sword before shipping. I have a week or two for it and I really want to do this Happy
also I count that new owner will share his impressions about finish, handling, etc...
anyway - it was an interesting experience making this particular sword.

p.s. - there is a few more in Musee de l`Armee that I want to recreate... but best would be to recreate ALL of them Laughing Out Loud

Medieval Swords - www.artofswordmaking.com
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