Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Sword Displays Reply to topic
This is a standard topic Go to page 1, 2  Next 
Author Message
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Thu 24 Feb, 2005 4:22 pm    Post subject: Sword Displays         Reply with quote

We have a separate thread going on the "Low priced Hanwei Edward III", and Aaron Schnatterly mentioned displays. So I am taking the opportunity to start a new thread. This may not be the right way to do it, but here goes:

Aaron Schnatterly wrote:

I just priced wood, glass, and hardware for a display cabinet. I want to keep the collection up, safe from grubby paws (and to keep those same paws safe from the sharp edges). I'll have to forgo one sword purchase just to afford the wood! THAT hurts my feelings...


So, what do you have in mind, Aaron? Right now, I just have my small collection sitting in an old gun cabinet, and want to provide a better display, but one that also remains secure.

How are others currently storing/displaying swords? I think we have had some prior threads that addressed this subject, but we have a lot of members that haven't shared yet.
View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Thu 24 Feb, 2005 5:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Steve-

Thanks for bringing this up separately. It could produce some interesting discussion. I had three different plans in mind, though none have definite working plans drawn up. Here's a rundown:

1) Something akin to a larger gun cabinet or curio cabinet. Display box 3 - 8 feet wide (I like 6), 18 inches deep, lighted from above. Glass on 3 sides, locking door(s) on the front. Base would be a box slightly wider and deeper with a drawer underneath to store appropriate maintenance supplies. Like a gun cabinet, this would have a key lock. How to arrange the swords inside is a bit of a question, but I would probably need to see the pieces to be displayed in order to figure that out. I wouldn't be opposed to a mirrored back if I could suspend them somehow... I have no estimate on the cost of this beast.

2) Large wall-mounted display case. Not dissimilar to the message boards mounted on lots of walls at workplaces or schools where there is a corkboard behind glass. Again, made of a wood frame, and 4 to 8 feet wide by 5 to 6 feet long by 6 to 8 inches deep (allowing for ring hilts and rapiers and such which are obviously bulkier). The question I have with this one is how to open the thing... as I said, still out there in pre-plan stage. This also could have a key lock. Using a plywood back that is covered with canvas, velvet, or something nice looking, the collection could be put up with posts screwed into the back, and, by recovering the plywood if the collection needs to be rearranged, the piece would be fairly flexible. I think I could do a 4 x 8 for about $100 (in oak) plus glass.

3) Same as option 2, but built to house a single sword, therefore built to it's dimensions plus an aesthetic bit of extra space. The door would be much simpler - frame it and attach it with a piano hinge.This might be locked, though I don't like the aesthetics of this. If I can find a way to lock it from the side, however... The box would be semi-flexible in that another sword of similar proportion could be placed within. This could be set on top of something or mounted like a picture on the wall (in either orientation). In this case, I would consider making hangers for the sword out of wood, either on both sides of the guard or close to either end of the blade, dependant, of course, on whether the case is to be horizontal or vertical. For the Next Gen Regent, the case would need to be about 52" x 12" x 4". I'm estimating I could make this for $55 (in oak) plus glass.


I'm a decent woodworker, though I'm far from Bob Vila or Norm... Still, option 3 is straight forward - a table saw and router, a sander, and an hour and I'll have it put together and ready to be finished. Option 2 could be nearly as simple, though I have to get access without obstructing the view worked out. I may go with the sliding tempered glass pane option like they do in these cabinets I mentioned, though I fear they may come out a bit cheesy. Splitting it into two framed doors, though, may still work if the swords are well-placed inside. Option 1 will require some time discussing framing out the cabinet's carcass with my brother (who IS a wood genius) as well as borrowing time in someone's shop or increasing my woodshop dramatically. Which would I prefer? Ultimately as my collection grows, I would love to need all of them. For now, I am looking to make option 2 work... Howy and Peter are coming out with so many nice longswords that simply have to have... need a nice home for them. Besides, I could house a dozen swords in the larger wall case for twice or three times the cost of building a display for 1. Of course, there is always pine...

If anyone would like to see sketches (or decent plans if/when I can get them), please let me know. Also, I am DEFINITELY open to comments, suggestions, or alternatives...

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Glen S. Ramsay




Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
Joined: 10 Dec 2003

Posts: 91

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 2:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would like to do something like Aaron's #3 suggestion, which I believe is something like the display cases United Cutlery has with their new LOTR Museum Collection swords. (pics of MC Sting below)
I would like to get a custom one like that made for my Jody Samson sword, and to have a separate such case for any new high-end swords I get in the future. Need lots of wall space, though...



 Attachment: 120.23 KB
MuseumCollectionSting(case).jpg

View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 5:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Glen-

Thanks for posting the picture. Yes, that is exactly what I had in mind for the #3 option - right down to the side-mounted lock, and another touch I hadn't considered in the motion-limiting slides in the corners. This would work nicely for a single or perhaps a double case, but I am still concerned about making a case that is much wider than, say, 2 feet with a door that opens that way. My concern is that it would create too much of a lever when opened and tip, twist, or rip it off of the wall. At this point, I am thinking about making one like this in pine just to see how it will work. I have a few options for the joinery. I'm leaning toward the rabbet or the splined miter (as seen here: http://www.diyonline.com/servlet/GIB_BaseT/di...docid=1242) or a variation (?) of the splined miter where a couple of biscuits are placed in a slot cut across the sides of the mitre, glued, and shaped to match.

Now... to find those fittings... especially that lock! The Vinland needs a new home!

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Joel Whitmore




Location: Simmesport, LA
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 342

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 6:09 am    Post subject: Cases         Reply with quote

When making a large case with a door one has to remember that glass (even 1/8" thick glass) is very heavy. It will work if you mount the case to the wall securely ; either use a museum mount or mount the case directly to the studs in your wall. I have bult several like this and believe me, hanging it on the wall just won't do. Aaron, when you say joinery, I assume that you mean in the corners of the frame. Again, with a large case, no amount of joinery will keep the frame square. I have found that using 1/4" Louan for a backing will solve this problem. If you want to hide it, then cut some shallow dados in the back of the frame and inset the backing. If you haev a good table saw, then this should square up everything and make the frame sturdy. It's certainly doable. One thing you may try for finishing oak is just sanding is very smooth, then applying some boiled linseed oil to the wood. It brings out the grain beautifully and is a cheaper and less of a hassle than multple coats of poly. After the Linseed oil dries you can put a coating of wax over it to keep the wood from drying out. The only thing I think you'll find is that it will cost a little more than you anticipate. Wood is expensive nowdays. Especially plywoods with a particular wood finish. That is, unless you are getting it wholesale from somewhere. But it's really fun if you like woodworking and very satisfying when it turns out the way you envisioned it. Good luck Aaron and let us know how things turn out.

Joel
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 7:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joel-

Thanks for the tips. I had definitely intended on some behind the scenes shoring - some 45^ braces in the corners behind the back board or "L" brackets on the inside if I chose to line the box with velvet which would disappear behind the liner. The use of a table or radial arm saw for this project is (for me) a given. I had also considered using plexi instead of real glass for anything that would be a framed door. If I go with the sliding glass doors or solid glass doors like are often seen on stereo cabinets, then I will need to go with tempered glass. The weight is definitely an issue, as is the moment arm and torque developed by opening a swinging door. The last thing I want to do is create a serious hazard for people and promote damage to the case and collection inside.

I definitely like the idea of the linseed / wax finish. I have seen this done before, and the effect is really quite nice. I probably will go with that. I had forgotten about this and how nice it does turn out.

On a side note, I did find the locks I was looking for - now to find them at a reasonable price. The intent of the lock isn't to keep it from theft, just to limit access. Ones designed for roll-top desks or jewelery boxes would work perfectly (for my option #3).

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Nate C.




Location: Palo Alto, CA
Joined: 13 Jun 2004

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 301

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 7:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A quick word on finishing the wood. I have been looking into something similar for my first sword (NG Mercenary) and I've been told that some woods (oak especially) have a high acid content. This is something to consider when choosing a finish. Especially if the wood will contact metal.

Good Luck,

Nate C.

Sapere Aude
"If you are going to kill the man, at least give him a decent salute." - A. Blansitt

If they ever come up with a Swashbuckling School, I think one of the courses should be Laughing, then Jumping Off Something. --Jack Handy
View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 8:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nate makes an excellent point. I would like to think that sealing the wood would elimintate this issue, but I would like to know for certain before I put a few thousand dollars worth of swords in an expensive cabinet just to have them corrode. I had intended on not having direct contact with the wood, using some type of peg or hook on either side of the guard, probably covered in a section of oxygen tubing (like they use in the hospital) for support, or, in the case of the wooden brackets, line the bracket with velvet.
-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Glen S. Ramsay




Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
Joined: 10 Dec 2003

Posts: 91

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 3:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You guys have made me aware of issues I never thought of at all. Thanks...
I never would have thought of the weight of the open door being a problem. Of course, I had planned all along to mount it directly to studs in the wall, so it may not have been an issue anyway, but I'm glad it is something I will think about now. Maybe plexiglass, if it looks okay. Has to be nice and clear though... no cloudy sheen to mar the view of my babies! Worried
View user's profile Send private message
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 5:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am just getting back to this thread after my computer fainted last night. I have been thinking along the lines of all three of the options that Aaron cited.

Option 1 – I like the glass on three sides. The storage for sword maintenance stuff is a plus. I would want to be wary of providing each sword enough space so that it is not overshadowed by the rest of the pieces. Not sure I would like a mirror on the back. Seems like it might be a little fussy for my taste. But the big advantage is that you can get a better view of whichever side of your swords is facing the back!

Option 2 – Concept is interesting. Two key issues in my mind are the structural support, as Joel mentioned, and, as Aaron said, convenient, lockable access into the case.

Option 3 – I have seen cased like this termed "shadowbox". I think that this is a really nice way to highlight one or two pieces in the collection that you want to emphasize. However, if you have, say, a dozen swords, to construct, and then find wall space for all 12 might be a problem. A nice advantage of the single- or double-sword shadow box is that you can “theme” the interior to match the sword(s). For example, if you are displaying a baskethilt, you could cover the back with a tartan, and maybe put a targe in the case, too.

The United Cutlery case that Glen posted has a nice idea – including some type of text description of the sword. I like the hinges and appearance of the lock in that case, but I am unclear on how it works – can’t see a keyhole.
View user's profile Send private message
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 5:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Cases         Reply with quote

Joel Whitmore wrote:
When making a large case with a door one has to remember that glass (even 1/8" thick glass) is very heavy. It will work if you mount the case to the wall securely ; either use a museum mount or mount the case directly to the studs in your wall.


Joel - Pardon my ignorance, but what is a "museum mount"?
View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 6:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for your thoughts, Steve! I'm on my way out for the weekend, so, rather than a long post, I'll toss some quick comments into yours.

Steve Grisetti wrote:
I am just getting back to this thread after my computer fainted last night. I have been thinking along the lines of all three of the options that Aaron cited.

Option 1 – I like the glass on three sides. The storage for sword maintenance stuff is a plus. I would want to be wary of providing each sword enough space so that it is not overshadowed by the rest of the pieces. Not sure I would like a mirror on the back. Seems like it might be a little fussy for my taste. But the big advantage is that you can get a better view of whichever side of your swords is facing the back!


I'm really leaning toward this style. I'm hesitant to put the mirrored back into mine - just wouldn't fit into my space very well. If there was a piece that was really begging to be seen from all sides, I suppose a smaller mirror could be in order. It would be twice the work and at least twice the cost of option 2, but well worth it in a lot of ways. Supporting the thing securely is an issue I really don't want to mess up on. Some of the swords in my planned collection are in the 48 inch neighborhood, give or take a couple. For 6-8 longswords, a case 4.5 to 5 feet high (plus the base) by 6 feet wide (2 doors or sliding glass) would probably suffice, possibly would be a bit large (so I'll just have to buy more swords Razz ). I figured by setting them in a pyramid or staggered way, the guards would fit like bricks, and eliminate some of the dead space between.[/quote]

Steve Grisetti wrote:
Option 2 – Concept is interesting. Two key issues in my mind are the structural support, as Joel mentioned, and, as Aaron said, convenient, lockable access into the case.


Doable, but, in my case, my case is likely to be 5 feet high by 4 to 6 feet wide. This is a nightmare to mount, handle, keep square, get in and out of, etc. I am likely going to forego this option.

Steve Grisetti wrote:
Option 3 – I have seen cased like this termed "shadowbox". I think that this is a really nice way to highlight one or two pieces in the collection that you want to emphasize. However, if you have, say, a dozen swords, to construct, and then find wall space for all 12 might be a problem. A nice advantage of the single- or double-sword shadow box is that you can “theme” the interior to match the sword(s). For example, if you are displaying a baskethilt, you could cover the back with a tartan, and maybe put a targe in the case, too.


"Shadowbox" is the right term - thanks, been trying to think of that for 2 days. I like the idea of a thematic box - may do that with a couple or three viking pieces, possibly with a fur background. I agree - this isn't the method I want to use to display a large collection, but would make a nice piece or two display.

Steve Grisetti wrote:
The United Cutlery case that Glen posted has a nice idea – including some type of text description of the sword. I like the hinges and appearance of the lock in that case, but I am unclear on how it works – can’t see a keyhole.


I think it's just a hole in the side of the case. The lock grabs the lid / door and pulls it in. Same type of lock used in jewelry boxes and roll-top desks. The middle hinge is easy to find, but I am having no luck finding the ones in the corners with the slide.

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Joel Whitmore




Location: Simmesport, LA
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 342

PostPosted: Fri 25 Feb, 2005 7:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Cases         Reply with quote

Steve Grisetti wrote:
Joel Whitmore wrote:
When making a large case with a door one has to remember that glass (even 1/8" thick glass) is very heavy. It will work if you mount the case to the wall securely ; either use a museum mount or mount the case directly to the studs in your wall.


Joel - Pardon my ignorance, but what is a "museum mount"?



Hi Steve,
There may be another name for this , but what you do is take a 1x4 and rip it down the middle but wiht the table saw blade set at a 45 degree angle. Attach one of the pieces to the wall and the other to the case. In essence, you put the pieces back together to hang the case. It is a very strong way to hang something, but you must make sure that the board secured to the wall is level. The only way you have to level it after the fact is to remove the piece and resecure it.

Joel
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Sat 26 Feb, 2005 6:48 am    Post subject: "Museum Mounts"         Reply with quote

Joel Whitmore wrote:
Steve Grisetti wrote:

Joel - Pardon my ignorance, but what is a "museum mount"?


Hi Steve,
There may be another name for this , but what you do is take a 1x4 and rip it down the middle but wiht the table saw blade set at a 45 degree angle. Attach one of the pieces to the wall and the other to the case. In essence, you put the pieces back together to hang the case. It is a very strong way to hang something, but you must make sure that the board secured to the wall is level. The only way you have to level it after the fact is to remove the piece and resecure it.

Joel


Yes - I have seen that before! Very simple, sturdy concept, but I see what you mean about the leveling.
View user's profile Send private message
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Sat 26 Feb, 2005 7:00 am    Post subject: Free-Standing Horizontal Display Case         Reply with quote

Guys,

I also remembered seeing another concept for a display case, but had to find where the thread was. This thread shows an antique case that Mac found:

http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t...ht=display

This horizontal display is pretty neat - but will probably require some more floor space, since you view the displayed items from the front, and gain access from the back.
View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Sat 26 Feb, 2005 3:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I had thought also of the showcase display as Steve brought up. I'd love this if I had a sizeable dagger collection or other artifacts that weren't so large, or were deep. I'm concerned that only the pieces up front would be seen, with the ones behind pretty much obscured or ignored. I like the idea, though, and will keep it in mind (with casters, so I can easily pull it away from the wall to access) if/when I do have a need this would serve well.

On another note, I have been thinking a lot on how to showcase the Vinland - I will end up with a larger longsword collection, but have a serious affinity for the Viking / Anglo-Saxon pieces (I'm 1/2 German, 1/2 Swede Big Grin ) and will have a smaller collection of 2 or 3 of these high-end pieces. I'm looking at building a horizontal shadowbox to fit these 2-3 in that horizontal orientation. The frame, I plan to carve with knotwork, either of my own creation or based on some historical piece. I'm looking for suggestions on inspirational carvings and for a background.

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Alex Oster




Location: Washington and Yokohama
Joined: 01 Mar 2004

Posts: 410

PostPosted: Sat 26 Feb, 2005 4:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I havent been to any real good museums, but how are they done there? I have seen pictures that make them seem to almost float in the case.... maybe in person I could figure it out, but from the pictures it seems like a cool idea. Full glass case and all...

problem with it for me is that I play with my collection too much to isolate it so much.

I built a custom rack for 7 swords and 6 spears at once that can be seen here: http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/users/3f74830c_c58a/...CBD5JLiX8P

I have been thinking of puting a single pane of glass or plexi in fron of the blades below, but not that energetic right now[/url]

The pen is mightier than the sword, especially since it can get past security and be stabbed it into a jugular.
This site would be better if everytime I clicked submit... I got to hear a whip crack!
My collection: Various Blades & Conan related
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Sun 27 Feb, 2005 9:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Alex Oster wrote:
I havent been to any real good museums, but how are they done there? I have seen pictures that make them seem to almost float in the case.... maybe in person I could figure it out, but from the pictures it seems like a cool idea. Full glass case and all...


"Floating" appearance - perhaps they use some kind of with a transparent material like lucite for mounts?

Quote:
problem with it for me is that I play with my collection too much to isolate it so much.


I agree that I want to have easy access to my collection

Quote:
I built a custom rack for 7 swords and 6 spears at once that can be seen here: http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/users/3f74830c_c58a/...CBD5JLiX8P

I have been thinking of puting a single pane of glass or plexi in fron of the blades below, but not that energetic right now[/url]


Alex - I can't connect up with your link - not sure if it is me or the link.
View user's profile Send private message
Steve Grisetti




Location: Orlando metro area, Florida, USA
Joined: 01 Mar 2004
Likes: 7 pages
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 1,809

PostPosted: Sun 27 Feb, 2005 9:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

More on the "floating appearance - here is a photo that I took of the Sword or Charlemage in the Louvre some months ago. You can clearly see the opaque supports in this case.

View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Schnatterly




Location: New Glarus, WI
Joined: 16 Feb 2005
Reading list: 67 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,244

PostPosted: Sun 27 Feb, 2005 9:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Steve Grisetti wrote:
Alex Oster wrote:
I havent been to any real good museums, but how are they done there? I have seen pictures that make them seem to almost float in the case.... maybe in person I could figure it out, but from the pictures it seems like a cool idea. Full glass case and all...


"Floating" appearance - perhaps they use some kind of with a transparent material like lucite for mounts?


Lucite is used, as is seen in the Sword of Charlemagne pic below, and does provide a solid and accessible display that's off the wall and off the shelf. I've also seen wire or fishing line used, suspending pieces from the ceiling. Problem with these is it's a much less user-friendly route - pain in the butt to take out and put back on a whim.

Quote:
Quote:
problem with it for me is that I play with my collection too much to isolate it so much.


I agree that I want to have easy access to my collection


Me three. I'm really liking my options #1 & #3, and want to pursue them once I actually have the pieces in hand to do so. I may play with a prototype shadowbox in pine, as it's significantly cheaper. If it turns out to be presentable, then I will keep it. If not, then I will have worked out the bugs and can make a good one in hardwoods, stripping the fittings off of the pine one.

Quote:
I built a custom rack for 7 swords and 6 spears at once


Looks great. I love it for the polearms (another facet of the collection I have yet to take the plunge on). How does it work, though, for the swords? My serious concern is that it would harm the points by having them repeatedly stuck down into the base. Perhaps not so much for the shorter, wider blades, but for some of the longswords with a narrower, more needle-like point, the thought gives me gas.

-Aaron Schnatterly
_______________

Fortior Qui Se Vincit
(He is stronger who conquers himself.)
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Sword Displays
Page 1 of 2 Reply to topic
Go to page 1, 2  Next All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum