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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2016 2:27 am    Post subject: help with smallsword blades         Reply with quote

hi, i need a hand with smallswords

my question is that i plan on buying a smallsword hilt/ blade for my clubs weapons display, i'd especially like for the smallsword to be used to contrast with the rapier we have (a blunted hanwei swept hilt)

i wouldnmt mind learning what cross sections smallswords had i kow some had simiar cross sections to rapiers and having more or less diamond shaped cross sections, in particular i want to perhaps have a cross that showcases the blade as not being cut friendly and quite stiff
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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 08 May 2009
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Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 1,494

PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2016 8:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The main choices are hollow triangular, and other (diamond, hex, lenticular, fullered diamond/lenticular). THe former are less cut-friendly and stiffer for a given weight.

The 17th century ones in the Wallace Collection are about 650g (just estimating from a first look at the weights), and the 18th century ones are about 330g. There's a lot more variation in weight in the smallswords in the Met Museum (which also has a lot more of them). Their 17th century ones look lighter on average, maybe 600g, and their 18th century ones vary from 300g to 1kg, perhaps with a median of about 450g. The lighter ones tend to have very weight-saving hollow triangular cross-sections, and the heavier ones tend to have more "sword-like" blades. Triangular blades become much more common around 1700 - thus the 18th century swords are, on average, lighter. Regular "sword" blades continued in use, so we still see heavier 18th century smallswords.

There were significant improvements in steel-making and steel-working in the late 17th century. It may well be that these enabled the development of the lightweight smallsword.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,836

PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2016 8:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

http://www.metmuseum.org/art/metpublications/...ing_swords

Downloadable or readable online

http://swordlinks.com/courtswords/courtswords.html

Cheers

GC
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Mon 14 Nov, 2016 8:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

https://www.medieval-fightclub.com.au/weapons-en/swords/decorative-swords/scottish-officer-small-sword.html

well i found the sword i'll likely be buying, ad quite heartily reconstructing. since i can see its several hunded grams overweight somehow and its got a few other defects, but i'm guessing some time and dedications with a dremel and grinder could help immensely

('the blade thckness is 4.5mm, a bit thin for my tastes but could be worse especially considering the price poi nt and that this sword is as much a prop as anything, something i can break out to show what happened to the rapier etc at medieval faires etc.
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Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 132

PostPosted: Mon 14 Nov, 2016 2:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It looks more like an epee du soldat than a typical smallsword. Didn't the French supply a lot of weapons to the '45? Might've included infantry swords like this.

Ed.: Unfortunately, it seems like true smallswords start at several times the price (Godwin, CS, etc.).
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Dan D'Silva





Joined: 28 Apr 2007

Posts: 132

PostPosted: Sun 20 Nov, 2016 5:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Deepeeka is now selling colichemarde-bladed smallswords for a pretty low price. KoA lists them at only 1 lb. 1.2 oz., with "a hollow V-shape" cross section only 2.4mm thick. Too flimsy? They do at least look more like a typical smallsword, to my eyes, and the weight sounds good.
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov, 2016 1:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan D'Silva wrote:
Deepeeka is now selling colichemarde-bladed smallswords for a pretty low price. KoA lists them at only 1 lb. 1.2 oz., with "a hollow V-shape" cross section only 2.4mm thick. Too flimsy? They do at least look more like a typical smallsword, to my eyes, and the weight sounds good.


the colichmarde does sound good, though since it is 90 USD, plus shipping, that will result in a nasty price hike from the MFC one though it is a much better sword overall, unless i can buy from depeeka directly
overall
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