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Taran Matharu




Location: London
Joined: 22 Jun 2016

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed 22 Jun, 2016 10:16 am    Post subject: Famous weapons that have since been lost?         Reply with quote

Hello,

My name is Taran Matharu and I am an author researching for my upcoming book. I've been reading the forum posts here and they have been immensely helpful. I was hoping to pose a question to you all, if that's ok.

I am searching for famous weapons/armour that were known to exist but have since been lost/stolen/disappeared. So far my list includes:

 661 – Zulfiqar

 778 - Durandal Paladin Sword

 1185 - The Kusanagi Sword

 1596 - Sir Francis Drake’s coffin, with his full suit of armour inside.

 1827 - Original Bowie knife

 1876 - Buntline special with Ned carved in the bottom

 1934 - John Dillinger, two thompson machine guns

 1945 - The Honjo Masamune

 1945 - Otegine, one of three legendary spears of Japan

Any suggestions or help would be hugely appreciated.

Thank you for your time.

Taran
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Jeffrey Faulk




Location: Georgia
Joined: 01 Jan 2011

Posts: 578

PostPosted: Wed 22 Jun, 2016 1:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The problem is that a number of these are, at the very least, heavily laden with mythology. Zulfiqar and Durandal especially. It's possible there was never an actual weapon called that-- certainly the Prophet had a sword when he fought, but who knows if it was called Zulfiqar or if people gave it that name years after the fact? Durandal is far less certain, for we are not even sure that there was a warrior of the Dark Ages named Roland who fought for Charlemagne at Roncesvalles.
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Mark Lewis





Joined: 19 Apr 2014

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 359

PostPosted: Wed 22 Jun, 2016 3:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Interestingly, there were actually a few "mythical" swords circulating in medieval times, though whether their owners actually believed them to be genuine relics or merely found them to be useful propaganda items is an open question...

During his rebellion in 1183, Henry the Young King resorted to seizing church treasures to pay his troops... from a shrine in Rocamadour he stole a sword that was claimed to be Durendal.

RIchard the Lionheart owned "the excellent sword of Arthur, which the Britons call Caliburn", ie. Excalibur. Richard gave this sword to King Tancred of Sicily in 1191, on his way to crusade.

Not to be outdone by his older brothers, John claimed to possess the sword of the hero Tristan. This sword was documented as being in his possession in 1207, but may have been lost in 1216 with the rest of the crown jewels.

John's sword of Tristan might be the source of some royal traditions that continue to the present day. Curtana, the blunt Sword of Mercy, is displayed during the coronation ceremony. A sword by this name is first documented in 1236, though the present day Curtana is certainly not this old. The 13th century Prose Tristan states that Tristan's sword passed to one of Charlemagne's paladins, Ogier the Dane, who shortened it and renamed it Cortaine.
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Eric S




Location: new orleans
Joined: 22 Nov 2009
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Wed 22 Jun, 2016 4:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeffrey Faulk wrote:
certainly the Prophet had a sword when he fought, but who knows if it was called Zulfiqar or if people gave it that name years after the fact?


These are said to be the surviving swords of Muhammad.
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Thu 23 Jun, 2016 3:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Drake was buried at sea so best of luck with that one...

There is no proof he was buried in his armour, just a report that one of his dying wishes asked for that to happen. No proof that the wish was recorded accurately either...

Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Thu 23 Jun, 2016 3:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

should add that if he was buried in his armour we do have several wrecks that show what the condition things might now be in.

http://www.alderneywreck.com/index.php/artefacts/armour for example

Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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E.B. Erickson
Industry Professional



Location: Thailand
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 434

PostPosted: Tue 28 Jun, 2016 3:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

One of Drake's swords is in Plymouth, England, although there's some who doubt the attribution to Drake.
Google "Sir Francis Drake's sword" and you'll find photos of it.

--ElJay
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Taran Matharu




Location: London
Joined: 22 Jun 2016

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed 29 Jun, 2016 1:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks guys, this has been really helpful!
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Wed 29 Jun, 2016 3:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thanks for that E.B. v interesting. Its a bit of a mish-mash isn't it? I'd immediately say wrong, but there again there is little to compare it with of the same provenance. Any other royal presentation swords out there from 16th cent England?
Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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