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Maciej K.
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Location: Poland
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PostPosted: Sun 15 May, 2016 12:57 pm    Post subject: Sword & scabbard based on Naumburg statue         Reply with quote

Reconstruction of the sword based on Count Ekkehard II sculpture from Naumburg cathedral in Germany (1249-1255). This is still one of the most important sources in medieval art about 13th century scabbards and belting.

More info and pics you will find on my website here: http://artofswordmaking.com/gallery/59/naumbu...bard-13thc

Measurements:
overall length 1030mm
blade length 885mm
grip length 90mm
blade width 47mm
thickness: at the base 5mm/ near the top 3mm
crossguard 205mm
pommel 50x46x31mm
balance 150mm
weight 1230g
sharp

PRICE: sold



[/img]http://kurokami.pl/naumburg/naumburg_sword_01.jpg[img]









In my opinion it is the sword for a mounted knight: long blade, tight handle and balance moved slightly forward, all of this features confirm that claim. This is the sword with nice handling, light and prepared for a strong cutting from a horse back.

Recreating the sword, I had to use some existing, oroginal swords, mostly German, as a base for the blade type and parameters. About the scabbard - after some research and consultations, I can be almost sure about the original look and belting style... I`ve made also before 3 scabbards in this style, and this was very helpfull to understand the form and technique.

I have added some wrapping over the grip, although an original grip is not visible on this sword but all other Naumburg swords have some decorative straps on the grips. This add-on can be easy removed from the grip.

The pommel on my recreation is smaller than on the statue of Count Ekkehard. It was my decision to make it smaller, after research of original german swords with copper-alloy pommels, which are simply smaller in reality. Seems like the artist-sculptor added some size to this element, maybe to emphasize the presence of the sword.

Some interesting fact is, that Count Ekkehard is actually an earlier person (early 11th century) but depicted by an artist in the middle of 13th century with 13th century clothing and sword...
Second interesting fact is that red and gold polychrome on the scabbard are actually remains of later painting, probably from 15th century. According to archeological research and German medieval art style, originally the colors was black scabbard and white belt.


Medieval Swords - www.artofswordmaking.com


Last edited by Maciej K. on Tue 24 May, 2016 2:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
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J.D. Crawford




Location: Toronto
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PostPosted: Mon 16 May, 2016 5:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's beautiful! I've been waiting to see a nice version of that sword for a long time.

I didn't know the owner predated the sculpture by 2 centuries. You've dated the sword to 13th century but this classic design could go back to at least 11th century. So maybe it was based on his actual sword from the original weapon or other piece of art?

The slight scaloping in the pommel might indicate a later date; is that visible in the sculpture or was that interpretation?
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Harry Marinakis




PostPosted: Mon 16 May, 2016 6:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Stunning work

The Naumburg statues inspired me to reproduce the same scabbard, though you did a much better job than me!
I used an Oakeshott Type XI sword.

What I found most interesting with the Naumburg statues was the sword belt that was really wide, and the ladder-like lacing on the upper scabbard.

And what I like most about Maciej is that he makes a wide range of historically-accurate swords and scabbards, not just the most common ones. He is a real inspiration.
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Maciej K.
Industry Professional



Location: Poland
Joined: 06 Jul 2006

Posts: 206

Feedback score: 100%
(1 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Tue 24 May, 2016 2:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J.D. Crawford wrote:
That's beautiful! I've been waiting to see a nice version of that sword for a long time.

I didn't know the owner predated the sculpture by 2 centuries. You've dated the sword to 13th century but this classic design could go back to at least 11th century. So maybe it was based on his actual sword from the original weapon or other piece of art?

The slight scaloping in the pommel might indicate a later date; is that visible in the sculpture or was that interpretation?


Thank you J.D. ! Happy about the pommel - yes, you may be right about that. the pommel here is rather based on some museum examples than exactly on the statue, which one is much bigger than mine Happy it is an interpretaion, because I wanted to use as a base some existing swords. I have choosed some from Musee de l`Armee and Malbork Castle Museum - all with 13th century dating.

Harry Marinakis wrote:
Stunning work

The Naumburg statues inspired me to reproduce the same scabbard, though you did a much better job than me!
I used an Oakeshott Type XI sword.

What I found most interesting with the Naumburg statues was the sword belt that was really wide, and the ladder-like lacing on the upper scabbard.

And what I like most about Maciej is that he makes a wide range of historically-accurate swords and scabbards, not just the most common ones. He is a real inspiration.


Thank you Harry !!!
actually your previous work inspired me, to be honest Happy You should know that your Naumburg scabbard is an important work and many people knows it and share as a source. I appreciate so much what you said. This is valuable opinion for me.
Now, after making three versions of this scabbard and belting, I can say, and hope, it may be close to original 13th century archetype - or at least to some of its historical variant.

... at the end I can tell you this sword is already sold (yesterday)... and I'm counting on some review from David Rawlings soon Happy

Medieval Swords - www.artofswordmaking.com
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