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Alexandru Bogdan




Location: Bucharest, Romania
Joined: 14 Sep 2015

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat 19 Sep, 2015 7:56 am    Post subject: For those who do HMB         Reply with quote

Hello, any HMB fighters here ?

I think it is a valid question for HEMA also.

I have noticed this issue when I was practicing muay thai 5 years ago, some types of heavy gloves were making my arms very very hard to keep up. It was a feeling as my muscles were very tensioned and I would not be able to keep them up anymore for a few seconds. (extreme muscle fatigue).

The same thing I noticed with some types of longswords (that are also heavy) . I don't have a big hand and when I hold it, after a few mins there is a particular type of sword that makes my arm muscle feel veeery heavy and unable to move it anymore... like weird. Any ideas what might cause this extreme muscle fatigue ?

1. I don't work out at gym but I am overall fit (I jog a lot). Should I try and lift more for the muscle to be more resitant ?
2. I use to crack/pop my whole body articulations. Could this be it ?
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Houston P.




Location: United States
Joined: 20 Apr 2015

Posts: 67

PostPosted: Sat 19 Sep, 2015 9:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am going to try to answer your question. I haven't ever done HMB, but I do practice HEMA regularly. I think what you were saying is that there were longswords you handled that felt very heavy, to the extent that after swinging them for a short time your muscles were exhausted. I would suggest that the most likely explanation for this is that the longswords you were handling were not made properly, and were either overly heavy and/or had poor weight distribution. All of the well made longswords I have handled, even a relatively large XIIIa, were not heavy. As to the possibility that you are simply using undeveloped muscles, I suppose it is possible, but it would be like causing muscle fatigue by throwing punches. It would take quite a few strikes, and to actually cause enough fatigue as to make holding the sword difficult is something that I have never experienced, even after hours of training. I do not think it likely at all, unless you almost literally never use your upper body muscles, and even then it would take a significant amount of time. Finally, if your problem is that you are experiencing muscle fatigue I wouldn't think the problem would be in your joints, but that if the problem really is your body, then it would likely be in your muscles. I hope this helps.
...and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one. (‭Luke‬ ‭22‬:‭36‬) To be without silver is better than to be without honor. -Norse proverb
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Herbert Schmidt




Location: Austria / Europe
Joined: 21 Mar 2004

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Posts: 161

PostPosted: Sun 20 Sep, 2015 12:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I admit, I had to google the abbreviation HMB first…now I know a bit more.

What you describe could be the result of how you hold the sword. If you grip it too tight constantly, this might be the cause.
Usually a sword is held quite loosely and only gripped tightly when the impact is imminent.
I see this with some beginners, they constantly squeeze the grip. Obviously this is very exhausting.

If this is not the problem, then I have no idea. Swords are not that heavy and normal fatigue feels differently.

greetings

Herbert

www.arsgladii.at
Historical European Martial Arts
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 965

PostPosted: Sun 20 Sep, 2015 9:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Weightlifting probably isn't the answer. The absolute best way to develop the muscles you need for fencing is fencing more. I know, it sounds too fun and convenient to be true, but it really works! Happy

I do know many beginners - myself included - get tired very quickly in part because we're not used to using our bodies in this way for extended periods of time. When you don't yet know how to properly transfer power from your feet through your body to your hands, there's a tendency to try and do everything with upper body strength alone which is a bad habit that gets really exhausting in short order. Often another part of it is lacking strength in shoulder and core muscles, but IME bad technique is usually a significantly bigger problem.

That said, I sometimes do solo drills with a weightlifting bar instead of a sword if I want more of a workout...

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


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PostPosted: Sun 20 Sep, 2015 1:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What is HMB? Is it Historical Medieval Battles?
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Alexandru Bogdan




Location: Bucharest, Romania
Joined: 14 Sep 2015

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon 21 Sep, 2015 4:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

yes....................................................
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James Arlen Gillaspie
Industry Professional



Location: upstate NY
Joined: 10 Nov 2005

Posts: 527

PostPosted: Mon 21 Sep, 2015 6:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

In my experience, many modern longsword grips are too big in diameter. The real longsword grips I have handled have been quite small in comparison, especially where the left hand holds the weapon, and I do not think it is because they had tiny hands back then! I have a 240 year old infantry saber that needed a new grip, years ago, and I made the new wood core the maximum size it would be to fit my hand. Then I put a spiral cord and leather on top of that! It is now too big, and very tiring to use compared to how it was when I acquired it. I would take a good grip over good balance, it matters so much IME.
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Tom King




Location: florida
Joined: 11 Sep 2009
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Posts: 428

PostPosted: Tue 22 Sep, 2015 3:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

General fitness level is important.

Hockey gloves are nothing compared to a set of gauntlets, let alone full arm armor with gauntlets.

To train specifically for HMB wearing and practicing with your full kit is the best training; it develops the specific muscles and gets you in tune with the limitations of movement with your harness (as well as showing you ways to improve/modify it). For more practical purposes working out improves your strength and stamina as well as getting you in shape.
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